AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
At least I think it did-- I was around 1300 hours (JVC G10) when the emergency light came on. Anyways, I'm going to replace it tonight with a new one.


Does anybody have any advice on replacing bulbs? Any advice on replacing exploded bulbs?


I am planning on replacing it like a normal light bulb. No gloves, possibility of dust. Is this bad?


Thanks in advance!

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
Boy, I would sure try to avoid getting any finger oils on such a hot-running and expensive lamp!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,525 Posts
Hi Ron,


I can't quite tell if you are kidding or not, so I will take this as though you were not, and answer normally :D.


Please don't touch the bulb with your hands! Getting a small amount of human oil on the bulb and then heating it up to D-ILA temperature is not a good idea!


Also, are you sure that it exploded? I have gotten the RS232 equivalent of the "Emergency" light a few times (always for doing boneheaded things), but none of them caused my bulb to explode.


Have you let it sit for a little while and then tried again?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Ron,


At least read the Users Manual. If I recall, it is very clear that you must not touch the bulb with your bare hands or else the new one is likely to explode at 0 hours.


- Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Don't touch that lamp!


I used to work in theatrical lighting... the lamps used aren't THAT different from most projection lamps.


The oils from your skin will get on the glass. When that lamps heats up it will either warp or explode. I've seen it happen more than a few times.


That's an expensive lamp to waste just because you don't want to put on some gloves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the info. I was being a little facetious, but it definitely drummed up some responses.


So what I'm taking from all this is don't get oil on the bulb.


Dust sounds fine (should I get a can of air?).


Thanks!

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
It's very easy to avoid touching the bulb. Just use your head... er... well use your hands but... ah geez, you know what I mean.


Like Humey said, it's encased and the glass is recessed back from the opening.


I've replaced my lamp once and have pulled the lamp a couple times for visual inspection - without gloves. I felt comfortable doing this once I saw how the bulb was arranged in the housing.


BTW, turn your projector on and see if it wasn't the over-temp circuit that popped. This thing sounds like a cap gun when it goes (at least mine did). I could have sworn I blew my bulb, but 15 min. later everything was fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Uh, as the confirmed owner of one exploded bulb, I think it's safe to say that you'll definitely know it if your bulb explodes. You hear a BIG *POP* followed by little bits of glass sound. No kidding! I have a Sharp DW100U and the bulb definitely exploded, and that's what it sounded like. The glass fragments were fully contained, so it wasn't a major issue. In my projector, it was pretty hard to get your fingers on the bulb unless you simply weren't trying...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Okay, I swapped bulbs last night-- the bulb hadn't exploded. I guess I'll keep it as a spare or something.


It turns out the lamp housing is really easy to get out and fairly easy to disassemble.


The only question is, can I get away without applying that gunk to the bulb? What is it, thermal grease?


The picture is much brighter now, but there are some weird artifacts that weren't there before. Is it possible that my clumsy installation is throwing a lot of EM noise?


Thanks!

Ron
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top