AVS Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sold my first (bachelor) house and am under contract on the first real family house for me, my wife and my kid. Although, I had dreams of a much more spacious man cave, such things as neighborhood, schools and kitchens won out over 1200 square foot finished basement



However, all is not lost as I do have a 750 sq ft/400 sq foot finished space to play with and I have many of the components I need/want from my bachelor days. This includes:


AV123/Onix Rocket R450 fronts, RSC200 Big Foot Center, Reference .5 surrounds, old Kenwood sub, Panasonic AE900U projector, Carada 80" screen and a Panasonic XR55 amp.


Yes, I had all of this stuff in my 12 x 16 foot living room in my 900 sq foot house...... when I was single. It quickly found its way to the garage when my wife (then girlfriend) moved in. Again -



The projector, amp and sub all need to be upgraded but for now they are serviceable and I'll be focusing on the space before I return to the electronics.


Here's what I have to work with: Tri-Level basement so we're talking drop ceilings and about 7'4-7'6 in head clearance. The basement is L shaped. Upon descending the stairs you've got a 23x11 space directly in front of you that "L's" to the right (13' into the 23' dimension) for an additional 13x10. There is an unfinished utility room (laundry, furnace, cleanout, hot water heater) immediately to the right that is not part of the dimensions I just listed.


Anyway, those dimensions are probably a bit inaccurate. I'll be back in the house tomorrow and will get truer measurements.


I'm planning on replacing the mineral fiber drops with some from Ceilume. Right now, I'm thinking something like this . I did read that this style ( here in black) has better acoustical properties. This would require changing the 48x24 grid to a 24x24 grid, but that's not the end of the world. Anybody have any experience with Ceilume or with any of these styles? Will the dart style really make that much of a difference in muffling sounds going upstairs? The lights are also awful office style fluorescents that I'll be replacing with cans or tracks or both.


Currently the space is carpeted. It's new carpet that the seller's put down but it's nothing special - basic cheapo Lowe's stainmaster pile carpet. I'm guessing, and will verify tomorrow, that they just put the pad straight on the slab. This brings me to my first big question in this project:


Carpet vs Laminate? The carpet is new and down so there is the path of least resistance. That said, it's probably right on the slab and it's nothing to write home about. My preference is to pull it up, put down Dricore and then put down laminate (probably a light colored maple or beach to counter the likely dark ceiling tiles). Of course, this is a more expensive and work intensive course of action in addition to potentially opening up the can of worms of floor levelling, etc (although the Dricore can help with this).


Before I decide on this course, is there a big reason why I should not do this? Basement seems pretty dry so I'm not worried about flooding. I'm more concerned with cold floors and inviting acoustical problems. Is there a general consensus here on those matters?


In addition to the look that I prefer, I also want the laminate because I'll probably buy a folding/rolling bar like this and it will roll better on laminate than it will on carpet once it's fully loaded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,011 Posts
Congrats on getting a real house and now a family!


As for your first question:

I agree with Big >> keep some form of carpet.


As for Dri Core:

You may or may not need this for warm floors (you did say there was pad under the carpet). If you are worried about the floor staying dry - you have bigger issues that should be dealt with first. Why not save $ and go thru a full change of seasons to evaluate what you have now?


As for ceiling:

If you cannot find a way to do dry wall - then the Ceilume product has a very nice look (I used it and am Happy). Just do not go this route if you must gain sound isolation or an acoustic benefit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
If you do Dri-core, they recommend another subfloor on top if you plan to glue anything down. I think they expect that if there was a water event, you could pull out the panels (without them being damaged), let them dry, and then re-install. That's why I decided on Platon rolls with OSB on top, to which I will be gluing down cork tiles. Check my thread to see how that went.


Congrats on the house. Looking forward to seeing your progress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not worried about moisture. I'm more concerned about cold Colorado winters (and I'm right up against the foothills).


Are the suggestions for carpet more for the acoustic benefit?


I'd love to drywall the ceiling but from the few tiles I've peaked under (over?) reveal that the plumbing goes under the floor joists (they aren't notched), so drywalling the ceiling would mean having to re-route some of the plumbing and notching the floor joists. Probably more than I want to take on.


I love the look of some of the merlot and black ceilume user installs but I'm afraid that with such a low ceilng that might be a bit oppressive. Also, even though I don't love the "dart" style, the acoustic properties will probably help the situation some. That said, I'm not terribly worried about sound proofing as the basement lies under the main level which consists of kitchen, living room and dining room. Family room is half a level down from that over crawlspace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
JP - I actuall read your thread a couple nights ago and, truth be told, it was what convinced me to spend the extra money on a floating dricore floor over having to deal with securing all the OSB into the concrete



Would love to see what the cork tiles look like. When I was reading, I was hoping you'd be to the floor covering by the time I got to the end...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh yeah - as for waiting and seeing how it plays out, one of my possible purchases is a pool table (one of the reasons for going over and re-measuring tomorrow). I'd just rather not deal with a floor install once I get a pool table down there. If I don't go with the pool table, waiting is definitely an option while I focus on the ceiling and wiring.
 

·
RETIRED theater builder
Joined
·
36,150 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by driftinj /forum/post/16945431


I'd love to drywall the ceiling but from the few tiles I've peaked under (over?) reveal that the plumbing goes under the floor joists

Drywall doesn't have to be attached DIRECTLY to the floor joists. You can use furring to drop the drywall to a level just below the pipes. This is fairly standard construction practice for basements. Better yet is to use Resilient clips and channel. Read about Whisper clips and channel at soundproofingcompany.com.


If you read the queendvd build thread you will see an example of dropping the drywall to just below some low hanging pipes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by driftinj /forum/post/16945449


JP - I actuall read your thread a couple nights ago and, truth be told, it was what convinced me to spend the extra money on a floating dricore floor over having to deal with securing all the OSB into the concrete

Yeah, that wasn't a blast, but I have had a few compliments on it from contractor types that have seen the project. I'm glad I did it that way because I saved a little bit of head room, in a short ceiling basement, I only had to put down one subfloor, and I pulled off the same thing as Dri-core for cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If I understand the RSIC clips correctly -


You install the clips to the floor joists at 48 intervals along the joists, starting 8" from the walls.


You then attach a 7/8" furring channel (but not a RC-1 or RC-2 channel) to the clips, across (perpendicular to) the joists and hang the drywall from the channel by screwing directly into the channel in between the joists.


For better results you hang one layer of drywall, apply green glue to another and then hang/stick that to the first layer.


Is that it in a nutshell? Doesn't seem too bad. What are some of the challenges? Where does one find a good suitable furring channel? Home Depot?


How important is the two layers of drywall w/green glue?


If I have the offset utility room with laundry, etc - do I need to also drywall that portion of the ceiling?


How much clearance does a RSIC and channel provide? It seems as though it would be enough to clear most 1/2" pipe hanging flush to the joists, right?
 

·
RETIRED theater builder
Joined
·
36,150 Posts
PM Ted White to get him to join in the fun in your thread, all Soundproofing questions will be answered.


You need to be aware that sound doesn't travel in a straight path and just engineering a good ceiling will produce only partial sound control.


With clips and channel you may need to add additional blocking so the result hangs low enough for the drywall to clear the pipes.


If you could remove a few of your ceiling tiles, take a picture of the ceiling and post a pic here we can offer more suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update:


Got a chance to get into the new house and re-measure. I'm glad I did - I really screwed up my measurements the last time.

Here is a link to a basic layout. Each square in the grid represents 2'x2'. The + represents a support pole and the dotted line running north and south of it, is a horizontal support beam which has been framed AND had drop ceiling tiles put around it. To the right of that beam, the outlined boxes with the V at the top represents the ceiling HVAC duct work and vent.


The U greyed in area is the utility/laundry room and and I plan on utilizing the wall marked M in that room for the equipment shelving.


The S is the position of the projector screen and the P is where the Projector will be wall mounted in front of the support beam mess (about a 10' throw).


The C greyed in area is a closet with crawlspace access for every part of the house "south" of the basement.


The E is the entrance.


I'll put a better sketch later, but this is the best I can do in google docs right now.


The walls are classic 70s panelling that has been painted white. Don't love it, but I can live with it for now.


I pulled up the corner of the carpetting and there's a cheapo vapor barrier and the cheapest looking pad I've ever seen in my life. That pretty much clinches it that the carpet is coming up. That floor is going to be ice in the winter.


The drop ceiling hangs at about 7'". Outside of the illustrated ductwork and support beam, I would have to hang a drywall ceiling down about 3" off the floor joists which would give me only an additional 2" of head room or so should I go that route. Right now, I'm thinking I'm going to wait and at some point in the future revisit tearing out both the wood panelling and ceiling and drywalling the whole thing. Would I like to that now? Yes - but time and money probably don't permit it.


Until then, I'm going to hang the Ceilume tiles. I thought about the acoustic panels advertised by marcstan but figured the whole black acoustic panel ceiling wouldn't be very attractive. Still haven't decided what style/color panel to go with from ceilume or whether I'll convert the 2x4 drops to 2x2 framework.


Now, back to flooring - As long as I'm ripping up the carpet, I figure I might as well put down the Dricor. I'm a little concerned about losing more headroom but my 6'10 friends will just have to suffer.


This brings us back around to the great flooring debate. I'm still thinking I want the laminate - I'm just not that big a fan of carpet and I think a light colored laminate will help open the room up a bit. I'm a little concerned about whether I'm creating a big echo chamber and am wondering if it might not look weird butting up on the painted wood panelling. These are the things holding me back from saying that's definitely what I'm doing.


Later, I'll put up a better sketch along with where I'm thinking of putting the ceiling cans and thoughts on furniture and maybe... a pool table?!


I move in next week. I'll also post some pics at that time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Let's see if this works.

Here is a sketchup of what I'm thinking right now. Pretty self explanatory I think.


Might be trying to do too much with the space but I really want that pool table...


The futon couch is the sole demand of my wife in the space. She wants something that someone can sleep on if we have more than one guest and I didn't want to deal with a sleeper sofa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Some talk of acoustic treatments...


From what I understand of acoustics (admittedly little), I think I'm going to definitely want to stuff or place fiberglass above the dropped ceiling. If I go with laminate flooring, I'll probably also want to at least put down an area rug in the seating area.


Also, it seems that I may want to put some acoustical panels along the long wall above the futon couch to try and balance out the non walled section opposite it, then when you get back behind the theater seating, have treatments on the opposite side walls on the back wall and possibly in the back corners to keep the sound from bouncing around back in that section. Is that an accurate assesment?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Update:


Moved into the house last week and have been busy unpacking, emptying the storage space and putting together countless pieces of furniture that my wife had to go buy the second we moved in. So far that has included - 3 6' book cases, 4, chrome "retro" kitchen chairs, 2 bar stools for the kitchen counter eating space, 1 end table, 1 sofa table and 1 coat rack/shelf thing for the entry way (of course, I also had to re-assemble two beds and a crib as well). In addition, I have sanded bannisters, hung curtain rods and assembled and hung a heavy duty cantilever mount for the family room LCD. Isn't moving great?


Needless to say, this hasn't left a lot of time for working on the basement but I have managed to come up with a plan and get some stuff ordered. Here's where I stand:

Floor

I've decided to go with laminate flooring. Bottom line, I just prefer the look. I was going to install Dricore, but Home Depot has apparently discontinued it just in the last few weeks. Since I didn't want to go the Platon/OSB route, I decided to go with Delta-FL which doesn't require OSB on top prior to installing the laminate. I'll put down the Delta-FL, then a layer of 3 in 1 underlayment (not necessary with the Delta-FL but I figure it could only help) and then some Armstrong Origins Northern Birch laminate flooring. I debated the Harmonics stuff at Costco but found the Armstrong Origins online at the same price as the Harmonics and I like the character of the birch better and it gets much better durability scores on reviews.


The Delta-FL shipped today so I should have it be the weekend. The laminate has not yet shipped.

Lighting

I ordered some 4" IC new construction/suspended ceiling cans from Ebay with black baffel trims for about $10/light shipped. Those should be here in the next day or two so that will be the first big project.

Ceiling I've decided to to with the Latte Ceilume Stratford tiles. I debated that or the Merlot, but didn't want to put a dark low ceiling down there, even with the lighter colored floor. I think I will probably paint at least the screen wall a burgundy color.


I haven't run my A/V wiring yet, but will do that when I do the lights. I was debating between these two layouts.

Layout 1

Layout 2


I think I've decided on Layout 2 for greater flexibility.


I am also going to look at what could be a very good deal on a pool table tomorrow night. A floor model Baxter Colonial with some "slight" scratches on the legs, including install, a good 21 oz worsted felt, and a basic accessory kit for $1800. I had looked at some cheap tables, but this is a good deal on a very nice table that should last and hold value a long time.


Still need to get those pictures up if I can figure out where my camera is.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top