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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking of adding a glaze over the MM final coat on the SuperDelux formula/setup. I believe this glaze will not make the screen to reflective but make the image in the UV range more visible. Deep purple's ?


UV Light Sensitive Powder mixed with solvent based ink.(UVW (White/White)6.5 ounces $50.00

Thin with solven (thinner).


Spray a thin even coat over your screen material as a final stage.

http://www.darkniteglow.com/shop/catalog11_0.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
After reading on this subject more I found the human eye can not see in this spectrum of light. Only using a black light can you see it glow with a plasma like effect.
 

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I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss this idea. There are flourescent brighteners that are used in lots of stuff (paper, detergent) to make things brighter, even in normal lighting. They work by absorbing the UV light and re-emitting it in the visible spectrum. I would guess that most projector lamps produce SOME uv light, and some of that would make it to the screen. I say it's worth a shot, at least on a small test panel.


J
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I had to come back and respond. I was reading on the properties of light and the spectum at which we see(good read). It looks like the UV rays are not seen in the visable spectrum because of it's wave length & how are eyes are made. I found how ever that the red part of the spectrum produces the largest wavelenth, closer to the infared area. I believe the reason Mississipii Mud mix is giving such good results is the addition of Red Oxide. I would make changes in the addition of Red Oxide in oder to see the diff. between them. The addtion of UV Phosphorus Powder would cover the low end of thespectrum while the red Oxide will over the high end.


http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/rdg/color/color.shtml
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by SensiStar
I had to come back and respond. I was reading on the properties of light and the spectum at which we see(good read). It looks like the UV rays are not seen in the visable spectrum because of it's wave length & how are eyes are made. I found how ever that the red part of the spectrum produces the largest wavelenth, closer to the infared area. I believe the reason Mississipii Mud mix is giving such good results is the addition of Red Oxide. I would make changes in the addition of Red Oxide in oder to see the diff. between them. The addtion of UV Phosphorus Powder would cover the low end of thespectrum while the red Oxide will over the high end.


http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/rdg/color/color.shtml
"pure red pigments absorb cyan light (which can be thought of as a combination of blue and green light)"


Any pigments added to the paint will be subtractive in nature resulting

in a color shift from the projected image.

http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssc...ht/u12l2e.html


b2b
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by b2bonez
"pure red pigments absorb cyan light (which can be thought of as a combination of blue and green light)"


Any pigments added to the paint will be subtractive in nature resulting

in a color shift from the projected image.

http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssc...ht/u12l2e.html


b2b
If a screen is painted a bright red and a white light strikes the screen then the color of that would be red. THe point im making is using red will increase the wavelength spectrum bouncing off the screen. The only problem is you have saturated red in your image so to compinsate for this you adjust your projectors red level in order to balance it out. The image should be alot brighter coming off the screen. The thing I notice with Superdelux was the great skin tones and this is because the red oxide in the paint. It's a way to increase the red levels without touching the projectors settings. The same could be said for your green levels and blue levels. When I make my Plexi glass screen I will be using a reflective mylar on the back and the MM paint on the front but I will add more red Oxide then is suggested in the formula.
 

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Great, tell us how it all works out.


b2b
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess I'm looking at this on a color level more so. Light is like a radio signal it has a wavelength. If a radio signal is weak then it's wavelength is short so I'm thinking if the red spectrum's wavelength is the strongest of the visible spectrum then the signal(wavelength) is longer. I'm a high school drop out so I really don't understand myself. LMFAO!!!! :D
 

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Quote:
Great, tell us how it all works out.
Too funny..


SensiStar, listen to the man. Adding color (in your case red) to the screen will not produce a brighter picture. You'll get less green and blue and the same amount of red as you'd get with a white screen.


However, you may be able to raise the contrast of the projected image with a slight drop in brightness. If you are interested in this approach, do a search for "color", "filter", "projector" and "contrast".


-jp
 

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If you look at a color wheel the more pure the red the more pure the green it displaces,.........aka red kills green.


I myself wouldn't use red oxide because it's to muddy of a red and would introduces a brown hue along with crushing whites faster then say a Britte / brilliant red would.


After all you don't want to kill the blue's (not that red oxide would) because blue is a common denominator color, by this I mean if you want any given color to be brighter/more vivid or just more pure then add blue.


anyways this is just my .02 cents


Ddog!!
 
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