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Discussion Starter #1
I've been posting pictures of my bar that I built in my basement adjacent to my open theater area in a couple of different threads and thought that I may as well begin my own thread. I am not going to give a lot of detailed measurements simply because my area will certainly differ from what others may have in their environment. I'll attempt to explain what I have done and why. I looked at many bar threads and plans and tried to keep mine simple and inexpensive.


I made my bar portable. Why? Simply because I may need to move it to get items in and out of my basement door. Believe me, it's stable and it slides across my carpet with ease. I just unscrew two bolt attached to the base cabinet and I can move it by myself.


As you will see from my pics, there is no blueprinted plan. I actually placed blue painters tape on the floor to see how the bar would impact on mobility in the room. I moved the tape several times.


I'm still adding items and changing décor frequently. I like my environment to be flexible; i.e. Superbowl parties, movie parties, etc.


The beginning;


Here you can see what the area looked like when we bought the house. The base cabinet I could use again, but those head knocker top cabinets had to go. They were narrow and not very utilitarian. They look great in the garage though! 




My research indicated that the bar should be 42 high from floor to top. Figuring that I would have a sheet of ¾ inch plywood for the top base plus and estimated ¾ inch of whatever I decided for the finished top of the bar. I had them cut both plywood sheets to 40.5 inches. This gave me four 40.5 by 48 inch sheets out of the two eight foot long sheets to make up my base.


This shows the long dimension. My base is 7 feet long by 4 feet wide with a 2 foot return.




This shot shows the 4 foot section of the base and the ¾ plywood top.




This shows the return and you can see the back of the bar that I used 2x4s to bridge the plywood sections.




How the unit will relate to the half of the basement room.





The beginning of the application of the bar railing. I love this stuff. It drove me crazy, but it looks good and is very comfortable. The chair is there to check the height, but it was several inches shorter than our final chairs. So why did I bother? Because I was thirsty!




Long side with railing application




Return side

 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Vikram R.




The staining begins




I wanted black granite tiles for the top but couldn't find a vendor that didn't require a large minimum number of tiles. So as you will see the top is oak flooring.



I used 1X3 oak on the corner ends and seams. I used a router to add a groove.




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I decided to put brass railing on for the footrest. Wood and brass, I like it. Search the net, there are bargains for brass railing and fittings, some are twice what others are.







 
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Discussion Starter #5
Hey Biggie.


I found the molding at a local Hardwoods vendor, believe it or not, just 10 minutes from me. They have all types of molding and exotic wood material. Bless the yellow pages!
 

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Very nice work , finished product looks like it weighs 1000#s



I'd like to do something on that order(still in the framing stages in the basement) with a lower counter on the inside so I can hide a fridge/freezer and a microwave.


John
 

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thanks for your kind words in the email. Its tough coaching now, so many parents now days baby their kids and make almost impossible to get the most out of them. I said almost impossible. ahhaha nice bar ill have to post some of my pics when im down the whole hting, you gotta get a projector man, its sweet
 

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Hey Mantown2! I would like to see some pics of your room. Sounds like a really cool setup from what you told me when you started the deal. I would imagine today is the biggest day of the year for you (Superbowl Sunday).


Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Since the bar is stained pretty dark, I decided to add rope lights under the top. The non-dedicate theater seating area is adjacent to the bar; I had to figure a way to avoid the light hitting you at eye level while sitting in the Berks.





So I laid the rope in clear channel and then pinned molding in front of the string of rope light.




Problem solved.

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/0


Thanks for the construction shots, it gives me some more ideas. I'm curious where you found the bar mouldings (the chin rest)? Sounds like you did some online sourcing. That moulding makes a huge difference in the final product.

Big,

Rockler carries bar moldings if you can't find it local. They also carry the brass bar tubing.


Bud
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks Bud and Mntneer.


I ran the rope from left to right on the outside all the way around to the inside terminating at the wall. I then plugged the rope into a lutron lamp dimmer then into wire mold that I installed on the inside of the bar. I have the kegerator and one small fridge plugged into the wire mold as well. This way I can disconnect one wire and move the bar around.


It is a little cluttered in this early picture, but you can see the wire mold under the bar top.

 

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Discussion Starter #15
Here is a shot as the bar is today. I'm constantly moving things around, but you will see the new fridge the wife got me for Christmas.




The back bar consists of 1x6 oak boxes (2) connected to a 1X6 shelf. The top is a 1X6 oak plank with crown and trim piece. The top lifts off and each box can be removed from the wall separately leaving the bottom shelf. The mirror is beveled standard mirror fare I got from Lowes.




A couple of close-ups of the back bar detail. I still have to paint the ceiling darker.














And one final shot of the completed (yeah right, my work is never done) BAR!




Hope this will give interested folks some ideas.
 

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HeyNow -


Once again, I gotta tell ya....BEAUTIFUL!


Any tips on actually building it? Like, do you think it would be easier to stain before final assembly? How about shelves underneath? Do you think they would just get in the way or make it too heavy?


Can't wait to get to mine, but I got a LOOONG way to go!


Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You could stain it prior to assembly. I glued and screwed it, so disassembly wasn't an option. Not one drop of stain got on the carpet
. I had several layers of canvas drop cloth down. Worked well for me.


All things considered my guess is the unit only weighs 250-300lbs. The 3/4 oak top is the heaviest part but the unit overall is well balanced. The nylon glides that I have on the bottom makes the bar very manageable.


I have additional counter top to put above the fridge that sits next to the kegarator. You could certainly do shelves in this application. Shelves would not work for me on the long side because I couldn't open the left drawer or cabinet door. That area makes a great place for the trash can. I didn't need any additional shelves since I have the storage under the sink.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
CaptRandy,


I'll take some this evening and post just for you!
 

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Great looking bar, I may use it as a model for my own! The question I have for you is what type of wood did you use as the facing for the lower portion of the bar that you stained? Also, how did you attach the molding to the lower portion, glue, finish nailer, or both?


Thanks!
 
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