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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,


I am considering a neutral density lens for my AE500u. After searching through the Internet, I noticed that some of the lens claimed to absorb the light and some claimed to reflect it. I think it would be better to absorb the light, but I am not sure.


My question is what experiences have other users had and is this potentially damaging to my equipment? If so, could the risk be eliminated by using a lens that does absorb the light?


The reason I am looking at these is because I get a headache from watching the projector. I am trying to do things to minimize this problem. 1). a neutral density lens and 2). back lighting (with rope light) the back wall that my screen will be on. I am also planning on some sort of gray screen because it should help with the addition of some ambient light and my room is white.


Thanks in advance,

Robert
 

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Reflective filters could conceivably affect contrast because of light scatter. Absorbtive filters will degrade over time. A gray screen is a much better idea than a neutral density filter because it will improve contrast in the presense of ambient light, which it sounds like you intend to have.
 

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Have you ever thought of just using a smaller screen and/or having a bit of ambient light behind you in the room?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for everyones comments, My current screen size is 80 inches and will not ever be more than 90. My sitting distance in between 1.5 and 2 screen diagonals.


As crazy as it sounds it helps to wear sunglasses and that is why I was thinking about the ND filter. I feel pretty stupid wearing sunglasses in a dark room.


In regards to lighting having the screen a few inches off the wall and lighting the back wall is more desirable because the light is not directly shinning on to the screen. I just have to be careful to not allow light to bleed through. I will be sure to post some pictures in a few weeks after everything is put together.


It seems so crazy to go through all this trouble but I can assure you anyone would be willing to give up some PQ to avoid eyestrain headaches.


People with ND lens experience speak up.


Thanks again,

Robert
 

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I have been using an ND 2+ filter with my Panasonic PT-L200U for 6 months. The improvement to perceived contrast and black levels is amazing. My home theater is in a finished basement. The room was originally designed for multipurpose use, with an RPTV as the display device, and front projection was an after-thought. We wanted the room to be as well-lit and "airy" as the rest of the house, not to feel like a basement. Walls and carpet are off-white and the finished drop ceiling is white. When I first got the projector the amount of light from the screen, even running the lamp in economy mode, was enough to light up the room and reflections off the ceiling were washing out the image somewhat. Try an ND filter first. For ~$20 it's a lot cheaper than buying a gray screen, and certainly easier than painting a DIY screen.
 

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I have a ND 2x filter for my X1 and am really impressed with what it did. The image looks much more film like and the very brights aren't over exagerated anymore. Plus the darks are really nice and black, the way they should be (they were not really bad before, this is just better). So I am really happy I spent the 40 bucks on this filter. By the way I am still projecting on my wall in my room, 84" 4:3 picture, sitting 11 feet back.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by scoby
A gray screen is a much better idea than a neutral density filter because it will improve contrast in the presense of ambient light, which it sounds like you intend to have.
Which one is better between a filter and a gray screen depends on what your goals are. The advantage of the gray screen is what you mentioned, but one advantage of the filter is that it can easily be removed for football, DiscoveryHD, or other things where you may want to increase your overall brightness level. Another advantage to filters is that you can get one with the right color balance to allow you to increase your on/off CR at 6500. For instance, if your reds are weak you either need to lower your green and blue to get to 6500 or use a red filter. The later one decreases your black levels more than your white levels.


I've never found a filter that didn't reflect some light or decrease overall brightness (CCxxR filters to get rid of some blue and green still filter some red). I prefer to tilt them and let the reflections fall on a piece of velvet when that is reasonable.


--Darin
 
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