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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a NEC DP-1200S Video Projector (mfg in 1990) with a VU1210-S interface box (I also have an IDC 1000) in a floor configuration. It was working fine right up until the Center Tube's (Green tube) started a coolant leak. It wasn't much, but caused it to operate intermittently. At times it would come on, and would operate until shut off. It seems like it is not operating currently. So here are my questions;


1. Is it worth repairing (I would tend to doubt it)?


2. If not worth repairing, is the fully operational VU1210-S, Wired service remote, IR user remote, or the rest of the DP1200S unit have any value (ala eBay or trade-in or swap value)?


3. I'd like to minimize my costs to replace/repair it for the short-haul, waiting for the next-generation of projectors(HDTV) for my next big purchase.


I have no problem with static and dynamic convergence (heck, I used to do it on my Novabeam 100), but electronic convergence is always a heck of a lot easier. So assuming I were to replace it with another projector unit, what would be some lower end SONY projectors with at least an equivalence to the NEC DP-1200S? (Is there any reference chart for Sony Projector models and features some place on the web?)


4. What other projectors should I be considering in the used market?


5. Is the IDC-1000 still good enough for use with more modern projectors (I only paid $20 for it, so it's no great loss if not)?


Thanks,


Ira
 

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Is your PJ floor or ceiling mounted? I have to assume it's floor, cause if it was ceiling mounted there'd be no electronics for the coolant to dribble into. The gasket covers are somewhat repairable by removing the crt, unscrewing the cover, bending it slightly so that when you retighten it, it clamps down harder on the gasket. Helluva lotta work though. The alternative is to simply go to your local electronics supply store and pick up a can of nonlubricating cleaner/degreaser for electronics, and hose out the boards right there in the vicinity of the green CRT so you get all the glycol washed off. Obviously, unplug the stupid thing before you do this, and wait a good 5 - 10 min after the blasting process to make sure all the cleaner has fully evaporated. Good luck...
 

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I've been using the IDC 100 for 2 years now until I upgraded to a Quadscan. It was like taking a veil off my eyes.


However, given the choice between video, or S-video or the IDC, I'd still go for the line doubled pix.


Curt
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mike,

Quote:
Originally posted by M NEWMAN
Is your PJ floor or ceiling mounted? I have to assume it's floor, cause if it was ceiling mounted there'd be no electronics for the coolant to dribble into. The gasket covers are somewhat repairable by removing the crt, unscrewing the cover, bending it slightly so that when you retighten it, it clamps down harder on the gasket. Helluva lotta work though. The alternative is to simply go to your local electronics supply store and pick up a can of nonlubricating cleaner/degreaser for electronics, and hose out the boards right there in the vicinity of the green CRT so you get all the glycol washed off. Obviously, unplug the stupid thing before you do this, and wait a good 5 - 10 min after the blasting process to make sure all the cleaner has fully evaporated. Good luck...
Thank you for your response. I said the system was set up in a floor configuration in my original message, but you surmised that anyway.


I understand the cleaning of the circuit boards, but am not sure about the issue/method of clamping down on the gasket. The liquid only seemed to come out when powered on (I assume due to heating and resulting pressure). How much liquid can the tube lose and still operate correctly? Is there a way to see the remaining fluid in there?


Thanks again,


Ira
 

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By golly, you did say floor. So much for my reading abilities..... Yes it's heat pressure squeezing the glycol out, but that would probably diminish over time as a little more seeps out (less potential pressure). To really understand what I mean by making the metal plate clamp down harder on the gasket, you'd really have to see the physical pieces to get what I mean. If you saw it, it would be fairly obvious what neeeds to be done to the coverplate to accomplish this. That part's easy, it's getting to the coverplate that's difficult. You can look into the lens to see level - as long as it doesn't get near the illuminated raster, you're fine. Compare to the other 2 CRT's for a reference. You've probably lost VERY little fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mike,

Quote:
Originally posted by M NEWMAN
To really understand what I mean by making the metal plate clamp down harder on the gasket, you'd really have to see the physical pieces to get what I mean. If you saw it, it would be fairly obvious what neeeds to be done to the coverplate to accomplish this. That part's easy, it's getting to the coverplate that's difficult.
I checked the bubble in the green tube and it is just a small bubble at the very top. The others look (as best as I can tell) completely filled. So I seem all set there.


Now just to be clear, when you say coverplate, do you mean the plastic cover over the lens? If so, I have done that and no leak has occurred in that section. There is an inner and outer set of 4 screws in the corners of the black lens assembly viewable from this position. Are these the screws to adjust?


Just on the other side of this black lens assembly is a rectangular gray metal about 1/4" thick surrounding the tubes. There are screws entering at least one side (I have not removed the top (for a floor configuration) circuit yet, but that should be easy enough). Are these the screws that need to be tightened?


Then the other big question is how much to tighten? I don't want to crack the tubes/lens!


Thanks again,


Ira
 

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Nope,

The gasket coverplate is on the bottom of the CRT metal casing. It doesn't have anything to do with the lens or the metal housing all the way around. It is a smallish, 3/4" x 2.5" (approximately) metal cap, held in by 2 screws that clamps down on a rubber gasket. That's why I said you'd have to remove the CRT and that's it's a helluva lot of work....
 
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