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I'm looking towards the NEC and it said it's 4:3. on the NEC website it said it can support 1.85:1, 2.35:1, 16:9. Does that mean i'll have those bars like on a regualr 4:3 tv or will it stretch it likes it's supposed to?
 

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What the projector is (4x3 or 16x9) makes no difference what you are going to see on screen in respect to black bars.


If you have a 16x9 screen, you will have no black bars on top or bottom if you play 16x9 material. If you have 1.85 or 2.35 material, you will see black bars on top and bottom. This is true for all projector projectors be it 4x3 or 16x9.


The differnence between the NEC and 16x9 projectors is that when you use 16x9 material, the 16x9 projector will use the full resolution of the chip it uses. On the other hand, the NEC will only use a portion of its resolution if uses 16x9 material. On the other hand, if you feed it 4x3 material, then you use the full resolution.


With the NEC, if you use a 4x3 screen then when watching 4x3, the screen would be completely used, if you watch 16x9 or 1.85 or 2.35 you will have black bars on top and bottom


The bars are no an issue of the projector but the aspect ratio of the screen.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by darkman6420
I heard that a new lens is coming out soon. i think the panamorphic. Wut does this lens do?
The HT1000 is a 1.33 aspect ratio, or 4:3 projector. All of the wider formats are presented with various size bars top/bottom depending on the format. ie... a 2.35 aspect film with have bigger bars top/bottom than a 1.85 aspect film.


The HT1000 has the ability thru onboard scalling, to stretch a 1.85 or 2.35 film to fill the entire screen. The image then looks tall and narrow as compared to proper aspect.


Then you can slap an anamorphic lens on the front of the Projector. A lens that either stretches the image horizontally, or compresses the image vertically to achieve proper projected aspect ratio.


The Panamorph is a vertical compression lens designed to compress a 1.85 or 16:9 image, that has been scaled vertically to fit the 1/33/4:3 DLP chip. The aaplication of an anamorphic lens has been around awhile, and the Panamorph PSO series lens works very well with the HT1000.


The Panamorph is not a new lens, as it has been available since last spring. There is a new lens from an X-Panamorph guy coming to market soon, called the Optimorph. This lens has received mixed reviews, and hopefully the eventual production model will atleast equal the excellent quality of the Panamorph PSO.


So, in a "business" world where 4:3 DLP chips are king, and the HT1000 takes the 4:3 DLP to wonderful presentation levels, the addition of an anamorphic lens offers an extra notch of performance for wide screen format programs.


Just to note... HD is a 1.85/16:9 format that matches up perfectly with the HT1000 fitted with the Panamorph PSO lens.
 

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does the panaorph change the offset of the screen? Other words can the screen be closer to the ceiling than with the stock nec lens?
 

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The Isco II lens does shorten the throw distance. The Panamorph lens does not effect the throw although it may lower the image if you have the proejctor ceiling mounted
 

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Thats right, when watching 4x3, the NEC uses 1024x768. When watching 16x9, then you only use a portion of the chip and thus use 1024x576.


Ironically enough, the new Mattehorn chips used in 16x9 projectors have the same resolution
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by drdk
does the panaorph change the offset of the screen? Other words can the screen be closer to the ceiling than with the stock nec lens?
I was sure the Panamorph did not increase the offset over the raw projector. But now a couple of reliable sources say there is some minor additional offset.


Still I am wondering if the more important issue isn't keystone. I'm almost positive there is less bottom keystone in my Panamorph/HT1000 projected image, than with the raw HT1000, with the screen position maintained. I seem to recall Shawn Kelly telling me the Panamorph was designed to reduce keystone on the HT1000. I will ask Shawn and confirm.


Here are my measurements...


HT1000 lens center is 5" from ceiling

Top of projected screen is 20" from ceiling

Screen width at center is 84"

Screen width at top is 84 1/4"

Screen width at bottom is 82 3/4"


So there is 1 1/4" of keystone in my projected screen from top to bottom, with most of the keystone happening in the bottom half of the image, with a slight barrel distrotion curve.


If I tilt the projector and lower the screen down to 29", I can then get perfect keystone at top and bottom, with the image just slightly wider at the center from the very minor barrel distortion.


My set up with the screen 20" down is perfect because I have my left center and right channel speaker mounted above the screen, which are Paradigm Atom v3 speakers on wall mount brackets.


So IMHO, the HT1000 Panamorph combination does not offer any offset challenges for me.


Even if I wanted to run the screen much high and increase the image keystone, I would be more than happy with the 3D Reform keysone correction offered on the HT1000.


I guess the issue comes down to a judgement on the whole idea of an anamorphic lens, scaling a wide screen image to fit the 4:3 DLP chip, and any positive observations.


I see a positive benefit.
 
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