AVS Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a Sony VX2100. I would like to upgrade to HD but I need one that shoots well in low light/lux. Any recommendations? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by nash1220 /forum/post/18260183


I own a Sony VX2100. I would like to upgrade to HD but I need one that shoots well in low light/lux. Any recommendations? Thanks.

Read the threads on the Sony 500 series (CX500/520 XR500/520 in 2009; CX550 and XR550 just coming out in 2010). The introduction of the Exmor R chip in 2009 bumped these cams up to or near the top of the list in that area as well as stabilization. They hold their own in outdoors daylight filming as well though some people favor other cams for that. But as someone pointed out, really crisp shaky video is inferior to slightly less crisp very stable video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by nash1220 /forum/post/18260183


I own a Sony VX2100. I would like to upgrade to HD but I need one that shoots well in low light/lux. Any recommendations? Thanks.

The CANON 5D2 / 7D / 2Ti (550) are widely considered as the low light masters.


The 2Ti is only $800 (body only) at Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Canon-T2i-3-0-...7925495&sr=8-1


Just use your existing Canon or Nikon (with adapter) lenses - or pay an extra $100 for a starter lens. http://www.amazon.com/Canon-T2i-Digi...7925495&sr=8-2


I have yet to see any evidence that the 550 series Sonys can perform in low light in the way these Canons can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepster returns /forum/post/18263080


The CANON 5D2 / 7D / 2Ti (550) are widely considered as the low light masters.


The 2Ti is only $800 (body only) at Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Canon-T2i-3-0-...7925495&sr=8-1


Just use your existing Canon or Nikon (with adapter) lenses - or pay an extra $100 for a starter lens. http://www.amazon.com/Canon-T2i-Digi...7925495&sr=8-2


I have yet to see any evidence that the 550 series Sonys can perform in low light in the way these Canons can.

Same problem here and same question about the canon 2Ti:


- will the camera stop when reaching the 4GB limit ?


or I can record few hours of video without interruption ?


Also, which is the card with the biggest capacity that the 2Ti can support ?


Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by marcolisi /forum/post/18263155


Same problem here and same question about the canon 2Ti:


- will the camera stop when reaching the 4GB limit ?


or I can record few hours of video without interruption ?


Also, which is the card with the biggest capacity that the 2Ti can support ?


Thank you

The EOS Kiss X4 / 550D / Rebel T2i records for about 12mins, before you have to hit the record button again.


This camera takes SDXC - ie, up to 2TByte ! (yes that is correct). Will also use SDHC (32GB max). Auto focus works, but manual is best.


A sample vid: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2AXjF-wFVo&feature=fvsr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepster returns /forum/post/18263171


The EOS Kiss X4 / 550D / Rebel T2i records for about 12mins, before you have to hit the record button again.


This camera takes SDXC - ie, up to 2TByte ! (yes that is correct). Will also use SDHC (32GB max). Auto focus works, but manual is best.


A sample vid: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2AXjF-wFVo&feature=fvsr

Thank you, I will wait that they breake the 12mins. limit to buy one of them. For now, I am forced to stick with camcorders...


Than kyou
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepster returns /forum/post/18263080


The CANON 5D2 / 7D / 2Ti (550) are widely considered as the low light masters.


The 2Ti is only $800 (body only) at Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Canon-T2i-3-0-...7925495&sr=8-1


Just use your existing Canon or Nikon (with adapter) lenses - or pay an extra $100 for a starter lens. http://www.amazon.com/Canon-T2i-Digi...7925495&sr=8-2


I have yet to see any evidence that the 550 series Sonys can perform in low light in the way these Canons can.

I think you just need to read more reviews and owner comments . And look at YouTube and Vimeo postings. These cams are clear winners in the low light arena.


I hadn't even heard of the Canons you mention so I checked YouTube. It's because the 5D is a DSLR and not the equipment the OP was asking about. The clips look pretty decent except for one in a bar which is noticeably inferior to what a CX500V could do. But they all seem to have something in common I assumed at first was done on purpose. But now I'm thinking this may be a characteristic of the DSLR vs camcorder instead. Maybe you can let me know which is the case.


In all the low light clips, one part of the picture (typically the main subject) is in good focus and pretty nice. Everything else is out of focus. In a camcorder, you'd have to work to get that look, so I assumed in the first few clips that this was on purpose and was meant to be artistic and photo-like. But I didn't find a single clip where the entire frame (or even much of it) was in focus. This looked much more camera-like and much less video-like to me. Were the clips shot this way on purpose, or is this a limitation of these DSLRs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepster returns /forum/post/18263080


The CANON 5D2 / 7D / 2Ti (550) are widely considered as the low light masters.

Another thread suggested the Canon 5D 2 is a $2500 DSLR as opposed to a camcorder costing a third to a half that price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Gull /forum/post/18263258


.......


In all the low light clips, one part of the picture (typically the main subject) is in good focus and pretty nice. Everything else is out of focus. In a camcorder, you'd have to work to get that look, so I assumed in the first few clips that this was on purpose and was meant to be artistic and photo-like. But I didn't find a single clip where the entire frame (or even much of it) was in focus. This looked much more camera-like and much less video-like to me. Were the clips shot this way on purpose, or is this a limitation of these DSLRs?

This is known as shallow depth of field and is the result of the lens aperture setting. A camera lens has different aperture settings that affect the amount of light entering and also the depth of what's in focus. When the lens is wide open, it allows the most light in and has the shallowest depth of field.


So for example if you set the lens wide open and focus on a subject 10 feet away, objects closer and farther than 10 feet will be out of focus.


You can close off the lens aperture and get a deeper depth of field with everything in focus if that is needed, but closing the lens aperture will limit the amount of light. In this situation the DSLR will look more like a camcorder with it's low light limitations.


If you watch a movie or TV show you almost never see a scene with everything in perfect focus. Every scene and camera angle has a particular subject the director wants you to focus your attention on. Controlling the camera depth of field helps the director do this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by ronrosa /forum/post/18273830


This is known as shallow depth of field and is the result of the lens aperture setting. A camera lens has different aperture settings that affect the amount of light entering and also the depth of what's in focus. When the lens is wide open, it allows the most light in and has the shallowest depth of field.


So for example if you set the lens wide open and focus on a subject 10 feet away, objects closer and farther than 10 feet will be out of focus.


You can close off the lens aperture and get a deeper depth of field with everything in focus if that is needed, but closing the lens aperture will limit the amount of light. In this situation the DSLR will look more like a camcorder with it's low light limitations.


If you watch a movie or TV show you almost never see a scene with everything in perfect focus. Every scene and camera angle has a particular subject the director wants you to focus your attention on. Controlling the camera depth of field helps the director do this.

I realize it's depth of field and camcorders don't operate the same as cameras. This started as a discussion about getting a new camcorder, so my question is more "does this DSLR always work with depth of field this way or can it work like a camcorder does with a very flat DOF?". While this is the film or TV or artistic/photographic look, it's not at all what my camcorder video looks like, and it would be very disconcerting to buy this DSLR thinking you'd get the camcorder look and then getting this different DOF handling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Gull /forum/post/18274473


I realize it's depth of field and camcorders don't operate the same as cameras. This started as a discussion about getting a new camcorder, so my question is more "does this DSLR always work with depth of field this way or can it work like a camcorder does with a very flat DOF?". While this is the film or TV or artistic/photographic look, it's not at all what my camcorder video looks like, and it would be very disconcerting to buy this DSLR thinking you'd get the camcorder look and then getting this different DOF handling.

Yes you can get a deep DOF or what you call very flat DOF, similar to what a camcorder looks like. A DSLR lets you have shallow, medium or deep DOF.


Here is a quick clip shot with a Canon 7d and fisheye lens. I would call the DOF medium to deep. I could have set the lens aperture to make it look more video like if I wanted. But that is not why I bought a DSLR.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by ronrosa /forum/post/18274801


Yes you can get a deep DOF or what you call very flat DOF, similar to what a camcorder looks like. A DSLR lets you have shallow, medium or deep DOF.


Here is a quick clip shot with a Canon 7d and fisheye lens. I would call the DOF medium to deep. I could have set the lens aperture to make it look more video like if I wanted. But that is not why I bought a DSLR.


+1. With a DSLR you have DOF control, not to mention choice of lenses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by ronrosa /forum/post/18274801


Yes you can get a deep DOF or what you call very flat DOF, similar to what a camcorder looks like. A DSLR lets you have shallow, medium or deep DOF.


Here is a quick clip shot with a Canon 7d and fisheye lens. I would call the DOF medium to deep. I could have set the lens aperture to make it look more video like if I wanted. But that is not why I bought a DSLR.


Great, thanks. I hoped as much. It just seemed odd that all the clips I viewed were so different from the native clips you'd take with a camcorder. You can play games with the camcorder to get a little more DOF and focused/unfocused areas of the frame. But it takes work and many types of point-and-shoot scenarios look very strange with that effect.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top