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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, after a couple of test days with my closet door shut with my components all blazing in their glory for a full day, I've decided it's a smidge too warm in there for everything to run happily. When my receiver exterior is so hot I can't touch it, that's too hot. :)


So, with this in mind, I'd like to put a thermostat in there that is connected to a NuTone fan at the top of the closet. I've read many of the threads on here about thermostats and boxes from Smarthome that kick things on when the temp. reaches a certain level. However, I'd like for this solution within the closet to look as neat as possible.


I've been trying to read about how one might connect the leads on a cheap, wall thermostat to a 120v powered device (i.e. the fan). It looks as though most thermostats use a 24v wiring system therefore I'd need to somehow step down the 120v to 24v so that when the air got too hot in the closet the fan would kick on.


This means a transformer of some kind. I found one at Home Depot that looks like it should be mounted in a junction box or something. Big heavy booger with 4 colored wires coming out of one side and two terminals (+/-) on the other.


If I were to run this setup with the fan, the transformer, and the thermostat in the closet, would this work? I'm sort of guessing here and I don't want to fry anything (i.e. me) with experimentation on this.


Can anyone with HVAC experience tell me if this sounds correct?


TIA!

Jamie
 

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I'd like to suggest a simpler solution: an attic fan T-stat. It has the right temperature range, it's made for line voltage, and it's easy to mount. You might even find a way to use a gable-mount attic fan for the closet, which will come with its own T-stat.


It should be relatively easy to use an HVAC air register and flex hose to remote-mount the fan to keep the noise under control. As an alternative to the attic fan, you can find duct-mounted fans, called 'booster fans', that can be inserted anywhere in the duct run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Larry, thanks for the response.


I actually looked at the unit's you're talking about at Home Depot. The thermostats that came with those fans were clunky looking metal boxed types of thermostats with the metal flexible tubing coming from them. I need something with a little more, say, "aesthetic" appeal, however, something along those lines would be perfect with the line voltage.


If there is such a thing as a line voltage level thermostat, I'd be set, but I haven't found anything like that yet that is not so industrial looking as the attic fan controls.


I'm all eyes/ears if someone has a source to a line voltage thermostat.


Jamie

Quote:
Originally posted by Larry Fine
I'd like to suggest a simpler solution: an attic fan T-stat. It has the right temperature range, it's made for line voltage, and it's easy to mount. You might even find a way to use a gable-mount attic fan for the closet, which will come with its own T-stat.


It should be relatively easy to use an HVAC air register and flex hose to remote-mount the fan to keep the noise under control. As an alternative to the attic fan, you can find duct-mounted fans, called 'booster fans', that can be inserted anywhere in the duct run.
 

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Jambo


Glad you asked the question, I'll be needing a thermostat for a fan in my equipment closet soon.


Did a quick google search for attic fan thermostat (Per Mr. Fine's advice) and found the following, It doesn't look too bad.

http://www.2kstore.com/gragr/cooler/cool11.htm
 

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This is the exact same problem I had, I fixed it cheaply, easily, and the results are awesome! Great cooling and almost completely silent!


I used a "LUX" LV3 'cooling only line voltage thermostat'. It is designed for swamp coolers, but looks and works great. The photo of the LV3 in the link above is not entirely correct, the temperature scale runs the opposite direction.


Combined the LV3 with the NuTone LS80 bathroom fan. It is the quietest fan that I know of, and puts out 80CFM. I have the same fan in my master bathroom and have accidentally left it on a few times because it is so quiet. Very reasonably priced to boot.


I got all of my materials at Home Depot. The thermostat was less than $10, and I think the fan was about $85. They have cheaper fans, but none this quiet. The store display allows you to test the fans for comparison. The only way that I could tell the LS80 was running was to put my ear up against it. The others you could hear quite clearly. I also put a standard on/off wall switch in the circuit just in case I needed to override the fan for any reason.

http://home.earthlink.net/~tim_schaefer/pic/therm.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You may be my hero, here. GREAT information!

Quote:
Originally posted by Jetlag
This is the exact same problem I had, I fixed it cheaply, easily, and the results are awesome! Great cooling and almost completely silent!


I used a "LUX" LV3 'cooling only line voltage thermostat'. It is designed for swamp coolers, but looks and works great. The photo of the LV3 in the link above is not entirely correct, the temperature scale runs the opposite direction.


Combined the LV3 with the NuTone LS80 bathroom fan. It is the quietest fan that I know of, and puts out 80CFM. I have the same fan in my master bathroom and have accidentally left it on a few times because it is so quiet. Very reasonably priced to boot.


I got all of my materials at Home Depot. The thermostat was les than $10, and I think the fan was about$85. They have cheaper fans, but none this quiet. The store display allows you to test the fans for comparison. The only way that I could tell the LS80 was running was to put my ear up against it. The others you could hear quite clearly. I also put a standard on/off wall switch in the circuit just in case I needed to override the fan for any reason.


I will post a photo once my digital camera batteries are charged.
 

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Jambo,


The LS80 is a very quite fan as far as bathroom fans go (I have 8 of them in my house) but they still generate more noise than you might want in your theater.


The use of a duct booster fan allows you to move the fan away from the theater with a section of flex duct. This is a much quieter option. I use a 600 CFM duct fan to move air in my theater room at the end of 12 feet of 12" flexduct. It is quieter than the 80 CFM LS80 in one of my bathrooms. Something like this should be good for an equipment closet.

http://www.nutone.com/product-detail...roductID=10330


Good luck!
 

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Here is another page with the solution worked out for you. You could use a 120 V fan or even a small A/C unit. It allows you to set the temperature and then remotely turn on an off a fan or A/C unit. No difficult wiring and a clean approach.
http://www.smarthome.com/solution26.html


..Doyle
 

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I thought he was just attempting to cool his equipment closet, not the entire room. I think that 600CFM might be a bit excessive for this purpose IMOHO. My equipment closet is roughly 3' x 3' x 8', or 72 cu ft. This means my fan changes the air out once per minute, the duct fan would do this over 8 times per minute. I also mounted the thermostat out of sight near the top of the closet where it gets hottest and leave it set at 85F. Nothing to mess with, reliable and fully automatic.


If sound is super critical, then maybe something other than the NuTone, but I have not found anything better in it's price range. In my setup, with the closet front door closed (it has both a front and rear door), the fan absolutely cannot be heard unless you stand right at the door and the room is completely silent. From 3 feet away, it cannot be heard. The front door is sealed around the edges and fresh air is drawn in from the adjoining room through a furnace filter to keep the dust out.

http://home.earthlink.net/~tim_schaefer/pic/rack.jpg
 

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Oh, one more thing, on most fans the type of motor used does not allow you to run it through a dimmer (been there, tried that). The fan motor will just stop and produce a very loud hum. I would check with the manufacturer first. I initially was going to use a more powerful fan and 'dim' it to my own needs. I found that the LS-80 is more than adequate for me.
 
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