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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a projector for use in our conference room at work. It will be used mostly for viewing computer applications, web browsers, text, etc, so readability is the top priority.


The room is about 15ft wide x 25 ft long. Projector must be ceiling mounted. It's a 9ft ceiling, and I would like it mounted as close to the ceiling as possible, so it doesn't look distracting. I know for certain I want XGA (1024x768). There are no windows in the room, and we can control the light, so I suppose moderate lumens would be fine.


This is my area of uncertainty...I would like to be able to produce geometrically correct image without loosing text readability, so I wanted optical keystone correction (not digital). In looking at projector specifications, I found it difficult to find any with this option. I've read that some projector lenses properly compensate for table or ceiling mounting, but I'm confused on which models have this feature.


Looking for a price range of about $2000-$4000.


Any suggestions on the best projector to fit this application, along with recommended mounting configuration would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks, Jeff
 

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I doubt you would be able to see much impact on text with current digital keystone correction: it is pretty impressive. With a 9 foot ceiling you wouldn't need much: I have a NEC LT240 mounted on an 8 foot ceiling, and the image doesn't need any keystone correction.


I don't believe you will see "optical" correction in a machine under $10k
 

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I doubt you would be able to see much impact on text with current digital keystone correction: it is pretty impressive.
Thanks, I'll take a look at LT240. I've borrowed a fairly new 800x600 native panasonic (not sure on model #) from another dept. a few times., placed on a table top and projecting upward. The digital keystone correction, in my eyes, makes a noticable impact on clarity of text.


Are some digital keystone corrections better than others? Seems like having some extra pixels on the left and right of the screen would help so that the smaller edge is upsampled, rather than the larger edge downsampled.
 
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