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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live approximately 20 miles north of most the Boston, MA TV antennas and approximately 40 miles south of a New Hampshire PBS antenna. My home is almost on the strait line connecting the MA and NH antennas. I presently use the Radio Shack double bow tie UHF antenna in my TV room and get the Boston DTV stations when I point it south and get the New Hampshire DTV station when I point it north.


I would like to put a bi-directional antenna in my attic to be able to receive DTV from both and mostly opposite directions without using a rotor. My TV room is on the first floor and I have a two-story home. This indicates to me that an antenna in the attic should be no problem. The only problem to me is that I want it to receive singles from opposite directions.


An antenna that can also receive VHF would be nice but not required.


All suggestions are welcome.


Thanks,

MikeD

 

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I use a Winegard GS-2000 amplified birectional and am pretty pleased with its performance. I'm 15 or so miles north of the Needham towers and get signal strengths in the low 80's to high 90's on my Dish 6000 IRD.


The GS-2000 is must be aimed fairly precisely to work properly, however. Although I haven't checked since the tower ramped up to high power, I remember that a couple of degrees off of dead center would affect signal strength a considerable amount. I suspect that if this unit is to work for you, that the 2 sources you want to pull in need to be very close to 180 degrees to one another.


I bought the GS-2000 through Stark Electronics with the understanding that if it didn't work for me they would let me return it. You might want to see if you can do the same.


Good Luck -- Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Steve,


Thanks for your input.


These are the stations, bearing and distance of the stations I’m interested in. I got this info from the internet and I’m trusting they are mostly accurate. I’m able to receive all the stations except wfxt-dv and wgbh-dt using a RS double bow-tie antenna. I believe wfxt-dt has not been on the air since I’ve gotten my xbr2 htdv. I never seem to be home when wgbh-dt is broadcasting.


The worst case is between wenh and wfxt. They are only 150 degrees apart. Do you think this is too far from 180 for the bi-directional antenna?


How is the GS-2000 with analog stations?


Mike D

Station, Network, Analog, DTV, Bearing, Distance, Live date


Live or testing:

WGBH PBS 02 19 19.2 S 175 deg, 20 mi

WBZ CBS 04 30 04.1 S 175 deg, 20 mi

WCVB ABC 05 20 20.1 S 175 deg, 20 mi

WHDH NBC 07 42 07.1 SSE 165 deg, 21 mi

WENH PBS 11 57 80.3 N 005 deg, 39 mi

WFXT FOX 25 31 ??.? SSE 155 deg, 21 mi


Not yet live:

WGBX PBS 44 43 SSE 175 deg, 20 mi, May 1 2002

WSBK UPN 38 39 SSE 165 deg, 21 mi, May 1 2002

WLVI WB 56 41 SSE 165 deg, 21 mi, Jan 1 2002
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by MikeD
...I believe wfxt-dt has not been on the air since I’ve gotten my xbr2 htdv. I never seem to be home when wgbh-dt is broadcasting.


The worst case is between wenh and wfxt. They are only 150 degrees apart. Do you think this is too far from 180 for the bi-directional antenna?


How is the GS-2000 with analog stations?
Fox has been down for a while. If you can pull in WBZ-DT chances are quite good that FOX won't be an issue. Regarding WNEH and WFXT, it seems like it would be a stretch. My guess is that it all depends on what power level they'll be broadcasting at. To guess even further, I'd suspect that in order to get it to work you'd have to aim more towards WNEH given that it's approx twice the distance of the Needham towers. Also, at 39 miles you're close to the max distance for the GS-2000.


As far as analog station reception quality goes, I'm pulling in 38, 44, and 56 quite well. I haven't tried any vhf stations.


Regards -- Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Steve,


Thanks for your help.


When you get some time, could you check the analog on vhf like channels 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, and 11?

Do you have the antenna outside or in the attic?


I got the bearing numbers in my earlier post by selecting one station at a time on titantv.com and checking the antenna’s orientation. I since used a protractor on the printed “map station distance†and also checked antennaweb.org. WFTX-DT & WENH-DT appear to be less then 10 degrees from being opposite direction. It looks like the GS-2000 will be a good choice.


I hoping others will comment both good and bad experiences about this and other antennas.


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just to let interested parties know, I’ve tried the WineGard GS-2000 antenna. I was disappointed. I could not get some of the DTV stations I could get with the Radio Shack double bow-tie antenna. The RS got better reception on the UHF analog stations. The GS-2000 was not that great on the analog vhf stations. I’m returning the WindGard and putting the RS bow-tie antenna in my attic. I may put a second RS bow-tie in the attic so I can get the dvt station in the opposite direction and use a A/B switch at the TV.


Your experience and mileage may be different.


MikeD
 

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Mike, here is something you can try.


Buy another one of those RS bowties and a coax splitter. Put them both up in your attic and aim each in the appropriate direction. Connect them both to the splitter. In this case you are using the splitter as a combiner.


Potential problems:

1) Multipath! If it's bad in your area this will probably make it worse. You now have two antennas to gather more reflections.

2) Signal strength. The splitter (combiner) will produce a 3 or 4 dB loss of signal strength. Some of this can be offset with a preamp. However if multipath is a problem a preamp with two antennas could make it worse.


If you try it make sure you can return it. There are other more radical approaches. See the following thread on this forum: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=27746. These guys are taking OTA reception to the outter limits!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Status of my bi-directional antenna:

I added a second RS UHF bow-tie antenna in my attic. I simply joined them by connecting the 300-ohm leads before the 75-ohm transformer. I have the antennas back to back facing opposite directions. I made sure the same sides of the antennas were connected together. Example - West side of the north pointing antenna was connected to the west side on the south pointing antenna. I don’t know if this really matters.


Results:

I am now able to get all the digital channels in both directions without adjusting the antennas or using an A/B switch.


Analog stations.

The analog UFH stations came in better then cable when I had only one antenna facing south. Now I get vary faint ghosting. However I have no problems or dropouts with the digital channels. I presently have cable for the local analog channels. I may switch to satellite some day. When/if I do, I will use an A/B switch for the antennas so I can receive all the local UFH channels as clearly as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update:


I removed the north facing antenna for the following reasons.

1. Some of the south stations would sometime break up in bad weather. (snow on roof, heavy rain).

2. Some of the south analog stations had faint ghosts.

3. The PBS station to the south started playing the same HDTV demos as the north station.


So for I had no problems with only the one south double bow-tie antenna including receiving all the DVT stations and a very clear (better then cable), ghost free analog stations.
 
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