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Discussion Starter #1
I've been using a Akai AP-A100 turntable and receiver for a while now, but decided to upgrade my receiver. I purchased a Pioneer A 10 K, which just arrived, but there is no place for the cable from the turntable to go. The cable has a plug which just fit straight in to the old receiver, but this one has a signal GND, which screws out a bit, as if to wrap wires around it to connect it, just like with the speakers. I have no idea what signal GND means, but I'm guessing i need to strip the plug bit off the cable from the record player, and wrap the bare wires around the signal GND? I thought best to ask before doing it and finding out i wasnt meant to!
 

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GND means Ground. That is for turntables that require to be grounded when attached. The Akai as far as I can remember should have RCA jacks to plug into the receiver phono or aux if it has it's own preamp, so I'm not sure what you mean by plugging it straight in. Do not strip the cable. If the Akai has no ground wire screw then it is probably internally grounded and doesn't need one. Perhaps a picture of the back of the TT and cables would help us. Hopefully someone that knows that turntable fully will chime in.
 

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Okay, I've sort of fixed the problem. I have had to plug the turntables power cable into the old akai amp, and then plug that into the mains to power the turntable. Is there a device I can buy to do this? basically something that convert the voltage of the wall socket to 12 volts and allow me to plug my turntable into it?
 

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so if you are talking about a power connection, that's a lot different from what most of us think of as connecting a turntable to a receiver. I frankly was not aware that any turntable utilized a power supply built into a receiver. But you live and learn . . . . If there's a Radio Shack still open near you, you might take the turntable in, and see if they have an appropriate transformer (wall wart) to power it. Either or both of the turntable and/or the old receiver will identify not only the voltage, but whether the center pin is positive or negative. Write that info down. Then you just, hopefully, acquire the appropriate power supply with the right kind of connector (that's why you bring the turntable), and away you go.

But if the tt has some weird connector that carries both power and the signal, you might have a lot more trouble replacing the old receiver as the hub for the turntable. Because based on my admittedly limited (in scope, although a few(!) decades in time) experience, such a connection is as common as hen's teeth . . .
 
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