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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know nothing about dB’s or splitters or cable TV related wiring, but I do know that I am done with paying Time Warner the ever increasing fees to get content that I never watch, so I am hoping to cut the cable and get an outdoor antenna and get network HD stations over the air. So this is my current situation. Inside the TW box on the side of my house are: 1 cable coming in from TW which leads to a splitter. Coming out of the splitter are 3 cables. One is -7dB and has a tag that says HSD and it goes into the house. The second cable is also marked -7dB and goes into the house. The 3rd cable is marked -3.5 dB and leads to a second splitter. The second splitter has 4 cables (all -7dB) that run into the house. The house is 9 years old and has 6 coax cable outlets (which I assume are fed by those 6 cables coming into the house from the box outside). 1 of the cable outlets is in the second floor finished attic room. The other 5 are in the rooms downstairs. A cable modem is connected to one of the outlets downstairs, which is connected to a computer. The other 4 are used to connect TVs. Only one of the TVs has a TW digital converter box. I’m fairly certain that I can identify where each of the 6 cables going into the house end up.


I want to keep TW cable modem internet service, but cancel TW cable tv service and get OTA channels using an outdoor antenna. Already tried using an indoor antenna and it doesn’t work. We are 37 miles from the tv towers and in a wooded rural area. So is there a way for me to accomplish getting OTA channels using the existing coax cables/outlets that are already inside the house?


I realize that TW will probably raise the cost of my internet only service, and I will do the math to see if this makes any $$ sense, but right now I would really appreciate it if someone could give me step by step instructions on how (if possible) to accomplish my goal. Thanks for your help!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncpierjockey  /t/1525820/need-help-connecting-outdoor-antenna-to-existing-indoor-coax-cables#post_24567548

I know nothing about dB’s or splitters or cable TV related wiring, but I do know that I am done with paying Time Warner the ever increasing fees to get content that I never watch, so I am hoping to cut the cable and get an outdoor antenna and get network HD stations over the air. So this is my current situation. Inside the TW box on the side of my house are: 1 cable coming in from TW which leads to a splitter. Coming out of the splitter are 3 cables. One is -7dB and has a tag that says HSD and it goes into the house. The second cable is also marked -7dB and goes into the house. The 3rd cable is marked -3.5 dB and leads to a second splitter. The second splitter has 4 cables (all -7dB) that run into the house. The house is 9 years old and has 6 coax cable outlets (which I assume are fed by those 6 cables coming into the house from the box outside). 1 of the cable outlets is in the second floor finished attic room. The other 5 are in the rooms downstairs. A cable modem is connected to one of the outlets downstairs, which is connected to a computer. The other 4 are used to connect TVs. Only one of the TVs has a TW digital converter box. I’m fairly certain that I can identify where each of the 6 cables going into the house end up.


I want to keep TW cable modem internet service, but cancel TW cable tv service and get OTA channels using an outdoor antenna. Already tried using an indoor antenna and it doesn’t work. We are 37 miles from the tv towers and in a wooded rural area. So is there a way for me to accomplish getting OTA channels using the existing coax cables/outlets that are already inside the house?


I realize that TW will probably raise the cost of my internet only service, and I will do the math to see if this makes any $$ sense, but right now I would really appreciate it if someone could give me step by step instructions on how (if possible) to accomplish my goal. Thanks for your help!
http://www.solidsignal.com has just about everything under the sun for cable and satellite. They have an 800 number and in 10 minutes or less what you need well be in the mail.
 

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Simple, connect the TW drop from the street to the line that goes to the modem, this will allow you keep the modem working.


Connect the other runs through a drop amp (splitter will degrade OTA signal too much) to the antenna line.


Done.


You will need to figure out and mark which line at the splitter goes where your self. It will be a good time to label them now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sounds simple enough, but not for me



What do I use to connect the TW cable to the cable that goes to the modem?


So I have to run a cable from the antenna to the box, connect it to a "drop amp", and connect the other 5 cables to the other end of the "drop amp"?


Can the "drop amp" go inside the TW box on the side of the house?


Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I found this statement. Doesn't this mean that I shouldn't use a DropAmp?


"Are the Electroline DROPAmps compatible with VHF/UHF and the newer HD antenna systems?


No. The frequencies for these systems are within the 54-1000 MHz band, so the signal will pass through and be amplified by the unit. However - the Electroline amplifiers are specifically designed for a cable TV signal - which generally arrives at the home at the same level across the spectrum.


In comparison - Antenna signals will have a high degree of variation - as the transmission points and original signal strength will be very different for each channel. Channels in close proximity to your home will have a very strong signal, channels far away will have a weak signal. As a result - our amplifier will can over-amplify an already strong signal. This will not improve the viewing experience. You are better off seeking an amplifier that is specifically built for an antenna application."
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncpierjockey  /t/1525820/need-help-connecting-outdoor-antenna-to-existing-indoor-coax-cables#post_24576193


I found this statement. Doesn't this mean that I shouldn't use a DropAmp?


"Are the Electroline DROPAmps compatible with VHF/UHF and the newer HD antenna systems?


No. The frequencies for these systems are within the 54-1000 MHz band, so the signal will pass through and be amplified by the unit. However - the Electroline amplifiers are specifically designed for a cable TV signal - which generally arrives at the home at the same level across the spectrum.


In comparison - Antenna signals will have a high degree of variation - as the transmission points and original signal strength will be very different for each channel. Channels in close proximity to your home will have a very strong signal, channels far away will have a weak signal. As a result - our amplifier will can over-amplify an already strong signal. This will not improve the viewing experience. You are better off seeking an amplifier that is specifically built for an antenna application."

Drop amp does not amplify signal per se, it just maintains the original signal strength as it is being split, i.e. it is amplified and reduced at the same time, maintaining the original signal strength. Weak signals will remain weak, and strong signals will remain strong.


Splitter will normally drop the signal strength as it is being split.


I have a drop amp on the antenna, and it works.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncpierjockey  /t/1525820/need-help-connecting-outdoor-antenna-to-existing-indoor-coax-cables#post_24572205


Sounds simple enough, but not for me



What do I use to connect the TW cable to the cable that goes to the modem?


So I have to run a cable from the antenna to the box, connect it to a "drop amp", and connect the other 5 cables to the other end of the "drop amp"?


Can the "drop amp" go inside the TW box on the side of the house?


Thanks!

I assume the line that goes to the modem is already there. Just use a "barrel" connect to the TW line.
 
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