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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,


I'm looking for a xga dlp projector that supports 16:9 ration. I would prefer to find one on ebay for under $2000.00. All the ones I see on ebay have aspect ration of 4:3. Thanks in advance for your help.


Thanks,


Don
 

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Good luck finding one for that price. 16x9 DLP's are HUGELY expensive. Probably over $20,000 and more than likely for professional use.


The only "inexpensive" (as in $5,000-$8,000) 16x9 fixed panel digital projectors currently are LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) from Sony and Sanyo. Not sure of any others off the top of my head.


The only bet for your budget right now is a decent 4:3 panel DLP or LCD projector and get a Panamorph anamorphic lens (when they finally see the light of day) to stretch anamorphically enhanced DVDs to their proper 1.78:1 ratio using all the available pixels of the panels, thus gaining the 33% more vertical (if I remember correctly) resolution than if the DVD player downconverted them to fit a 4:3 display.


Dan


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STOP DFAST and The MPAA!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I found the Toshiba TLPMT2U LCD on ubid for $3100.00 is that a good price for a LCD or should I wait and go the DLP route? If I were to go with a DLP with a 4:3 what would a Panamorph anamorphic lens go for(on average)?


Thanks,


Don
 

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I just saw a plus UP-1100 on ebay for the next day starting at $1800 with only 120 hours. The panel is native 1024 X 768. It will handle 16x9 at 1024x576 (if my math is right).


You may wish to do a search on this forum for thumper and up-1100 to see the modifications he is making to the projector. I had him modify mine and am very pleased.

 

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Quote:
Originally posted by majorwoody:
I found the Toshiba TLPMT2U LCD on ubid for $3100.00 is that a good price for a LCD or should I wait and go the DLP route? If I were to go with a DLP with a 4:3 what would a Panamorph anamorphic lens go for(on average)?
Don - I've never seen or heard of that Toshiba model. Since I've never heard it recommended or even discussed on avsforum, I'd recommend you stay away from it. It may be pretty good, but then again it may not. If you can't preview a unit (and, I would say, even if you can) you're probably well advised to stick with a unit that has had at least a few good reviews here on avsforum.


Many of the projectors discussed here at avsforum are essentially business presentation projectors (optimized for displaying static computer images) that someone has discovered also work well as home theater projectors. Although projectors are getting better, business presentation projectors can have big problems with displaying video images. Any type of business projector (or even "HT projector", for that matter)can have problems with "tearing" of the image and various scaling artifacts, LCD's can have "screen door" effects and very poor black levels, DLP's can have bad rainbow artifacts, hot whites, and there are other problems. Like I said, all projectors are generally getting better but if you're going to get a business projector for HT sight unseen (not really recommended anyway), you should at least restrict your choices to something that's been well reviewed on the forum. I would.


Also, since you're new here, I just wanted to make sure that you're aware that people can mean different things when they say a projector "has 16:9 support".


First,they could mean that the projector actually throws an image with an aspect ratio of 16:9. (Though this wouldn't ordinary be called "support for 16:9".) The only projector currently available with native 16:9 that's targeted at home theater (i.e., available for a reasonable price) is the Sony 10HT, which is an LCD projector. The advantage of native 16:9 is that there will be no "wasted" pixels when displaying source material with a 16:9 aspect ratio, which is the ratio of most movies on DVD. There will still be wasted pixels on a native 16:9 projector (i.e., letterboxing), when you display 2.35:1 aspect ratio material. Also, you will have wasted pixels if you try to display 4:3 material on a native 16:9 projector, since it will have to be "vertically letterboxed", with unused pixels on the right and left hand sides of the image.


(People want to avoid wasting pixels in letterboxing for two reasons: first, is that it wastes pixels that could potentially be used to add to the resolution and brightness of the projected image; second, and to my mind more important (at least when we're talking DVD resolution material) the wasted pixels on a digital projector are not completely black. They will vary from a dark to light gray, depending on your projector, and they distract from the actual 16:9 image that you want to be watching.)


The other thing that might be meant by saying that a projector "supports" 16:9 is that it can "unsqueeze" a 16:9 anamorphic source. This 16:9 capability is one that many 4:3 aspect ratio projectors have. The 16:9 material will be displayed "letterboxed" within the 4:3 image area, but the projector nonetheless has an ability to display true anamorphic material. This can be a nice feature, but be careful not to confuse this with the capability of a "native" 16:9 projector.


All 4:3 projectors (even those without "16:9 support") can display 16:9 anamorphic DVD's if you use a separate processor (outside the projector) to do unsqueeze the anamorphic DVD. This can be done using an HTPC (a PC that has DVD player software and appropriate hardware) or an external scaler. Many people who use 4:3 projectors that "support" anamorphic 16:9 processing use an HTPC or external scaler because they provide a picture with fewer artifacts (and have other advantages). So built-in support for anamorphic DVD's isn't as important as you might think. (It is important if you are dead set on feeding a projector directly from a DVD-player. If that's your situation, then you're well advised to limit your choice of projectors to those which support the 16:9 anamorphic unsqueezing AND which have good internal processing. The need for good internal processing will probably limit your choices more than the "16:9" support.)


Also, any 4:3 projector can be converted into a "native 16:9" projector with the addition of an anamorphic lens (or "prism" if you're talking about the Panamorph). THese lenses perform an anamorphic squeeze (or unsqueeze) after a 4:3 image leaves the projector. It's not as slick as having the native 16:9 of a Sony 10HT, but the results are similar: the image you see will be 16:9 without letterboxing. Many people on the forum use an ISCO lens that sells for slightly less than $2k. When available, it sounds like the Panamorph will sell for around $1,500 or so.


I don't know if you were confused or not regarding what "16:9 support" can mean when we're talking about HT projectors. I know I was when I started out, and I would guess that there are other new people who haven't figured it out yet, so I thought this was an appropriate thread to try to explain things. Good luck in your search. -- Herb




[This message has been edited by hsitz (edited 05-14-2001).]
 
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