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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im thinking im going to buy a CRT OR Digital projector soon after being unhappy with my non-hdtv big screen.So i have a few questions because i need some help.

1. Can a CRT/Digital Proj get better picture than and actual hdtv Big Screen TV? Can it get 480i 480p 720i 720p and 1080i?


2. Whats the difference between the CRT and Digital Projectors. Which one would i have a better exerience with and in my price range(see next question)


3.I need some suggestions on a CRT/digital proj. that will support ALL hdtv Resolutions. My price range should be about 1500 and below i might go to 2000.(1500 so i can spend the other 500 on cables and the other equipment ill need)


4.Incase it makes a difference ill be hooking up a Xbox, PS2, Gamecube, Dreamcast, Sega Genesis, N64, a Sony Dream System (the surround sound system in a box in case you didnt know), i will be running every thing off of component video that is cable of doing so.Ill also be hooking up a vcr via S-video. I will also have to be able to hook up cable tv to because i want to watch tv on it.


5.Will i have trouble watching it with lights on(wont be much of a problem if it is because this is in my basement)


Since im wanting so much for this would i just be better off with a 65in Widescreen HDTV???

Also whats the difference between a SVGA and XGA projector??Which one is better??


Also would burn in be a problem on a digital like a crt??(It will be gamed on heavily)


Ill add any questions if i think any more.


Thanks,

Jeremy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanx alot!! If you have any comments/suggestions/or opinons you would like to add feel free too !


Thanks,

Jeremy
 

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Jeremy, it sounds like for what you will be using the projector for (it appears that you are really into gaming), a digital projector might be more sensible than a CRT. The CRT's offer truly excellent picture quality, but at the cost of a lot of set up hassles. Plus, you probably will have to undertake some effort to find a used one in good shape that you know will be issue free for some time, and then get the behemoth shipped to you. If you read some of the posts on this forum, you will find that a lot of people are very happy with some of the lower priced digitals that are available today, and for the most part, for the uses you will be putting them to, they are virtually plug and play. Digitals also fare much better with ambient light; forget about using a CRT with any light on in the room. On the other hand, definitely consider a CRT if you are a tinkerer and don't mind dealing with some of the setup and convenience issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
archangel...do you think the projector you listed will look good with all other systems and tv??I forgot to mention there will be many movies watched on this...Also if i get digital would i have higher picture quality with crt over digital also would i stiill need a trans coder for my component if i get a digital...also smitty what kind of difficulties with setup are we talking of..im just looking for a projector that has SWEET picture hopefully higher quality than a hdtv rear projection tv..and its gotta be good for gaming,movies,cable tv. And i know im sorta asking a lot put can someone list out everything im gonna need..oo ya i one other thing to add in IM GONNA HAVE TO HANG IT FROM THE CEILING!!!! and what would you suggest for a screen
 

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SkylineR34, the $999.00 Infocus X1 gave me as good or better DVD picture quality than my Toshiba 55" HD Ready TV (4:3) even on an 9 foot diagonal 16:9 screen. It has a built in faroudja deinterlacer. Great results with it.


Click here if you want to see my the X1 in action projecting Spiderman in a very 3D looking clip at about 10 feet diagonal onto a textured white wall (at that time I didn't have a screen ready):

http://www.angelfire.com/ar2/buyitch...man_Clip_1.avi


It's a VERY small video clip, less than 2mbs, so keep the picture at no more than 100% for the best quality. Also, if you have any problems playing you'll either need to download the free divx player at: www.divx.com or download a DIV3 or Mpeg 4 codec.


I think this will help your decision.


Make no mistake, CRT is the king when it comes to home theater, but they are MASSIVE, and I mean MASSIVE. Even the smallest CRTs are incredibly huge. They also have a big learning curve and need a scaler such as an HTPC. Once set up properly they'll give you the best home theater possible. Digitals can display acceptable images with some ambient light (as long as it doesn't shine directly onto the screen. Digitals are very simple and very light. If you want this to be much more complex get a CRT, if not go digital.


Digitals will satisfy most people who aren't obsessive videophiles. I mean, the picture on my X1 is at least as good as my HD Ready Set (better in a lot of a cases because of the onboard scaler. That's saying a lot, because my Toshiba looks damn good.). That's unbelieveable when you consider the price of the TV was $2,200 for 55" and the X1 is $999 for 9ft (A bit less or more. Depends on how big you want to or can go).


Have a look at the video. I think it may help you out.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by SkylineR34
smitty what kind of difficulties with setup are we talking of..
Someone who has owned both a digital and a CRT could probably give you the best answer to this, but basically CRT's are heavy, they require a substantial amount of initial tweaking to get the high quality picture that they are known for amongst videophiles, and they seem to require convergance from time to time, although some say they don't have to re-converge too often. It is also my understanding (I could be wrong) that it is generally advisable for a CRT to warm up for 30 to 40 minutes to allow the picture to stabilize so that you get the best picture. They are definitely not plug and play or as easy to manage as a digital projector. If a digital projector has a problem, it is easy to ship back to the manufacturer to fix. If you have a problem with a 150 lb. CRT, it is a little bit harder to get it fixed. If you want to read about some the hassles, just scroll through the posts on the CRT forum and you will read about people exhibiting their frustrations with various CRT set up issues. I'm not suggesting you should rule out CRT. But you might want to get a look at the digital projectors in your price range, and at a CRT or two as well, so you can determine whether any picture quality difference is that noticeable to you, and what you are willing to put up with to achieve it. You might conclude: "Wow, the CRT picture is much better than the digital, I've got to have a CRT." Or you might conclude: "What's all the fuss about; give me that nice little 6 lb box that I just have to flip a switch on to get a great picture." Nobody can really determine what is best for you, and viewing the two types of technologies in person is the best thing you could do to help you make the right choice.
 

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Quote:
archangel...do you think the projector you listed will look good with all other systems and tv??I forgot to mention there will be many movies watched on this...Also if i get digital would i have higher picture quality with crt over digital also would i stiill need a trans coder for my component if i get a digital...
Jeremy,


Do a search for the Panasonic projector and read some of the threads and posts from actual owners of the 300U....you can private message them on their particular set-up and connections.


Depending on when you want to pull the trigger...there are a number of new projectors coming out....

Quote:
There is some buzz about a new Sanyo widescreen projector. The Sanyo PLV-Z2. Featuring 1280x720 LCD panels, the Z2 is higher in resolution than the Z1 (964x544). Rated at 700 ANSI lumens and with much improved contrast of 1200:1, it also incorporates lens shift, a short throw lens, and an extremely quiet fan with up to 3000 hours of lamp life in reduced power mode. Ship date is a little fuzzy, but we should be seeing it sometime this fall.
Quote:
at last year's CEDIA Sony unveiled the VPL-HS2 and VPL-HS10. They received a lot of attention due to their widescreen format and low prices. This year those models are being replaced by upgraded editions.....the VPL-HS3 ($1,799) and the VPL-HS20 ($3,499).


Of particular note is the VPL-HS20, a WXGA class LCD projector (1386x788) with a substantial boost in contrast over not only the earlier HS10, but the VPL-VW12HT as well. The VPL-HS20 at the moment carries the highest contrast rating yet from an LCD product—a truly remarkable 1300:1. And evidence of it was certainly there on the screen. In addition, fan noise is reduced from the earlier HS10 and connectivity is enhanced. The price on this unit is just $3,499.


The VPL-HS3 is the lower resolution (858x484) widescreen model. It is an improved edition of the HS2. Contrast is up to 800:1, brightness up to 1200 ANSI lumens, fan noise is substantially reduced, and connectivity is improved.


Both the HS20 and the HS3 are scheduled to commence shipments next month.
 
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