AVS Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

I purchased this dvd recorder about 2 to 3 years ago. Called up Sylvania, which is now Fugni or whatever. They could not tell me what the problem was and told me to send it in.. What it cost to send it in without them fixing it cost more than the unit itself. This has been really a great unit just shuts off when I put disk in or after I am done using unit. Sometimes it will play all the way through and sometime I will have to turn it on and off a couple of times to read the disk to run it. However it gets annoying doing that so many times. Was wanting to know if anybody else has had this problem and fixed it and give me some advise on it.

 

On a side, I did take it apart. It looks to be good except in one place. About the middle of the board. It looked like it got hot. for it is browner than the rest of the board. It don't appear to have toasted any of the circuits, like the capacitors, resistors, and diodes. It don't even smell burnt either, I think it just overheats and shuts down one of the components. Is there anyway to check the components on the board. I don't have the elaborate equipment repair people have, but have a cheap multimeter and some other stuff. New to all of this, any help would greatly be appreciated. I can post pics of the board if you think that would help anybody.

 

Thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,305 Posts
Your Sylvania DVR90DF is probably not 2 or 3 years old: it was a 2006 model. While you may have only owned it for 2 or 3 years, if you received it from someone else or bought it second-hand it is likely six or seven years old by now. Also, Sylvania branded electronics were (and still are) often sold by discount dealers as "new" long after being discontinued models. Meaning even if you literally bought it new in a sealed box two years ago, it could still be a good 6-8 years since it was actually made.


While that may seem trivial, it isn't: the lifespan of typical DVD recorders is measured in dog years, not VCR years. A halfway decent Sylvania VCR could work fine for 15 years, a Sylvania DVD recorder lasting more than 3-4 years would be a bloody miracle. The electronic parts degrade, the DVD drive mechanics and laser wear out. DVD recorders are disposable products, generally not repairable: ask the many AVS members who paid $500-$900 for a premium DVD recorder that died faster than the goldfish they bought their kid the same day.


With the help of a service manual you might be able to test your possibly-burned-out board to see if a simple 50-cent part replacement would get the unit up and running again. There is no "free" DVR90DF service manual available online, but you can use the service manuals for its twin-sisters Magnavox CMWR10D6, found at this link , or Toshiba DR-W2SU, found at this link (the Toshiba is a slightly closer match to the Sylvania than the Magnavox but they all use the same circuits aside from the "idiot-light" Magnavox front display). After clicking a link, wait a couple seconds for a preview image of the cover page to appear, then scroll down and right underneath it will be the sentence "This file is downloadable free of charge: Get Manual" Click "Get Manual" to download the PDF service manual. It includes schematics, correct readings and error display explanations. Note, you run a 50/50 chance the problem is not the main board or power section but the DVD drive: if the DVD drive is shot, the unit is unrepairable.


If I were you, I wouldn't bother. This Sylvania is prehistoric, it would be a better idea to replace it altogether with the newest version of it, which is now called the Toshiba DR430 . The DR430 is available from WalMart for $108 or Amazon for about $95. It should be able to play (and possibly finalize) discs that you hadn't had a chance to finalize on the Sylvania, since the operational interface and recording system is the same. One possible gotcha: unlike other brands of recorder, where compatibility among various models is assured, Funai (mfr of Sylvania, Magnavox, Toshiba, and Philips) stupidly had this as on "optional" feature that needs to have been turned on in your Sylvania's setup menu. The feature is called "make disc compatible," when it is enabled any of the dozens of Funai-made recorders can use each others half-recorded DVDs. Depending whether your Sylvania had this feature turned on when it made your DVDs, they might be easily finalized on a new DR430.


Unless you have a huge stack of half-recorded discs, or just want to tinker, it doesn't really pay to repair your Sylvania: the aging dvd drive could croak at any minute, and cannot be repaired or replaced. New budget-priced dvd recorders have almost completely vanished from the USA/Canada market (the Toshiba DR430 is the last one standing). If you liked using the Sylvania, buy a newer version of it while you still can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,530 Posts
There were several similar Funai manufactured models, I still have three or four of them in a closet... somewhere. See this post and the post following it:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1122418/toshiba-dr420/0_60#post_18808146


The feature mentioned by CitiBear is "Make Recordings Compatible" in recent models or "Replace Disc Menu" in older models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,530 Posts
need help 2,


I found the Magnavox MWR10D6 (of October 2006 manufacture) and opened the case and set aside the green Main (logic) PCB. Then I snapped a few photos. The Magnavox recorder was in good working condition the last time I used it but was stored away because it would loose scheduled programming, a problem with the Main (logic) PCB.


Compare the photos of the brown chassis motherboard with that in your Sylvania. The chassis PCB is part BE7A00F0102 as seen the third photo. By comparing the Owner Manuals for your Sylvania and my Magnavox I've found a possible complication. The Sylvania has a comprehensive front panel display while the Magnavox has two red and one yellow LED indicator lights wired to the chassis motherboard. The Magnavox front panel PCB is hard-wired to the chassis motherboard but there are other holes for wiring in a comprehensive display, as seen in the photos. I would have to remove the chassis motherboard to determine if traces are present for soldering in the lead for the Sylvania front panel display panel.








If this looks like it might work for you send me a Private Message for more information.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top