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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
WTF am I doing wrong... I seem to have a RTV that does not like long cable runs. I'm thinking, no biggie, I'll get a switch or a router to buffer the far end and be all set. To my surprise, it aint working!!! If I place the 50ft cable between my DSL Router/switch and either another 10/100 switch or hub, no device connected on the far end can see my router and, more importantly, get out over the net.


It is not the cable, as I can place it at the end of the chain (remote hub or switch) and everything works


This works:

Router/Switch ---> 3ft cable --> 10/100 switch or hub --> 50ft cable --> PC


This does not:

Router/Switch ---> 50ft cable --> 10/100 switch or hub --> 3ft cable --> PC


I'm using the exact same cables and ports.... 50ft is certainly nowhere near close to the limit of ethernet, so WTF is going on? In this second configuration, I cannot ping any device that is on the other end of the 50ft cable - another PC, router, etc...


I really do not want to run a wireless bridge, as the bandwidth is too slow for transfering files to my PC. Any thoughs?


Thanks much!


T:( :( :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
my bad.... I screwed up making the long cable... I copied the color code from a patch cable, not the defined standard... made the cable with the proper pinout, and all is well....
 

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How I remember it... alternating banded and solids orange, green, blue, brown with the solid blue and green swapped...


white-orange

orange

white-green

blue

white-blue

green

white-brown

brown
 

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How I remember it:

www.cablesnmor.com


Sorry to turn this into another debate about buy vs. crimp your own. But let's ask Ted how much time he spent trying to fix this vs. how much it would have cost to order / buy a cable.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by plyons10
How I remember it:

www.cablesnmor.com


Sorry to turn this into another debate about buy vs. crimp your own. But let's ask Ted how much time he spent trying to fix this vs. how much it would have cost to order / buy a cable.
Some people get pleasure out of DIY. It is certainly more efficient to buy rather than make tho.


However, I will say this, I did all the networking in my house--pulled seven runs, terminated them on both ends with female plugs *bought* short cables to go from the terminated ends in my wiring closet to go to my routers/switches. All told, what would have cost me $800+ once all the equipment and materials were bought (if I had contracted somebody to do it for me) cost me less than $200 because I did it myself. It took me an afternoon for 6 of the runs.


That said, I spent a summer a few years back working for Computer Network Services at Virginia Tech and was taught how to do it by guys who do nothing but pull cable.


Still, most of this stuff isn't rocket science. Its just takes a careful, methodical, effort.
 

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Careful, methodical efforts are where I flail.


Gimme rocket science anyday!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by plyons10
How I remember it:

www.cablesnmor.com


Sorry to turn this into another debate about buy vs. crimp your own. But let's ask Ted how much time he spent trying to fix this vs. how much it would have cost to order / buy a cable.


This is a cable that has been pulled through walls and run under the house, so "buying" this cable would not have been an option... I plan on pulling cat5 and coax throughout the whole house so that every room will have a 10/100 port, telephone and satellite connection... (the existing telephone cabling has much to be desired.... looks like a someone piecemealed it with modular cords everywhere... my DSL is half the speed it should be because of all of the stubs hanging everywhere... we won't mention the clusterf*ck job that comcast did with the cable)


My mistake was to copy a "purchased" 1m patch cable. THAT cable is wired wrong, but as the length is so short, things kinda work. Never though that this purchsed item would have been wrong and since I never really played with cat5 before, never questioned it... I now know better - do it myself to know that it was done correctly. Same reason why the I'm going to recable all the telephone and sattelite stuff.



T
 

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One thing to stay away from, if at all possible, is crimping your own RJ-45 plugs. If you're pulling your own cat5 through walls and such, do yourself a favor, and install jacks at the end of the runs. Then use a store bought cable to connect to the device. Jacks are easier to wire correctly and are not as prone to failure as user installed plugs on cable. Plus in-wall jacks look better and give you better flexibility if you decide to move hte equipment.
 

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I crimp all of the RJ-45 runs in my house by myself (when I'm running wires to a room, I go the panel route. It looks nicer and keeps the wife happy!)


But, for cables from the wall plate, I always crimp my own. When you can get Cat5e cable from Home Depot for under 7 cents a foot (probably cheaper now, it's been awhile since I bought my last roll), and a 50-pack of connectors for $3, I just can't justify paying $6 for a lousy 3 foot cable at a retailer.....


Once you've done it a few times, it's really simple. And with a decent crimper/tester, you get perfect cables everytime!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Phule
When you can get Cat5e cable from Home Depot for under 7 cents a foot (probably cheaper now, it's been awhile since I bought my last roll), and a 50-pack of connectors for $3, I just can't justify paying $6 for a lousy 3 foot cable at a retailer.....
Bought a 1000' reel for $39 :)
 

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Gee, Cyberguys.com has quality cat5 cables at $1.17 for a single 3 footer. At those prices it just doesn't pay to roll your own and take chances. And this coming from someone who's been doing electronics on the cheap for over 40 years and certainly knows how to make a solid crimp.


And what you may think is a "perfect" cable may just not be (we're talking high frequencies here), and you'd never know why your network experiences odd, non-reproducible errors.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by BaysideBas
And what you may think is a "perfect" cable may just not be (we're talking high frequencies here), and you'd never know why your network experiences odd, non-reproducible errors.
SOMEBODY does the crimp, whether it is you or some guy in a sweatshop in the third world. It isn't a flawless enterprise either way.


Just my miserable $0.02 worth,

Matthew.
 

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just a word of note ...

although the standard is orange , blue , green , brown ( green and blue cross ) , this doesnt mean that ALL wall and closet jacks conform to this ...

so when installing wall panels double check that you are getting the SAME brand name jack on each side , also keep in mind that a proper cat-5 cable can be used in both token ring and eather net ( token ring uses 4&5 cross insted of the 3&6 that eathernet uses ) , but as stated above , a wall panel labeled for token ring may NOT work in an eathernet setup.




but baicly .. anything under 30ft can be the excat same on both ends ..

Quote:
Originally posted by BaysideBas


And what you may think is a "perfect" cable may just not be (we're talking high frequencies here), and you'd never know why your network experiences odd, non-reproducible errors.
anything over 30 needs to have the blue in the 3&6 pin positions .. blue because of the number of twists per inch of wire ( if you notice , each color is twisted differntly ) ...


acctully .. you can even run a phone line on the brown .. although i wouldnt recomend it ( i.e the quote ).... ( heck .. you could run 2 eathernets on the same cable , but agin , not recomended )


also building codes do have very strict guide lines in the type of cable .. their is more than one typ of cat-5 , mostly having to do with the outside plastic .. some of the stuff will flash burn and cauze a major fire in your walls if you use the wrong stuff and ever have a fire .. other types ( allways the more expensive stuff ) is made for wall runs and will not burn ... not a big deal for most of us .. but if you want to do it right .. may as well have somthing that conforms to code if you ever go to sell the house ;)
 
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