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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased DVE: HD Basics on Blu ray to "calibrate" my Samsung LN32A450. I must say that this TV is pretty damn nice for the money. Anyway, the source is coming from my PS3. I have four questions:


1) What is the use of the red and green filters? I am assuming to check color accuracy when used with the color test pattern. If so, next question is related.


2) When viewing the color test pattern (the one most typically used with the blue filter) with the green filter, my green looks off. How can I fix this? Do I adjust the white color? However, when color is adjusted using the blue filter, my reds look accurate when viewing the pattern through the red filter.


3) I can't seem to get the contrast setting correct. After adjust the black level correctly, even with the contrast level at maximum, I cannot get the whitest white to start to bleed/blend into the next level darker.

4) How do I adjust the other settings like adjusting white color (RBG gains and offsets), Gamma, DNIe, Dynamic contrast (hi/med/low/off), all the individual color settings, etc. DVE:HD Basics does a good job covering the basics (namely contrast, brightness, sharpness, and color), but fails to go into detail about other settings.


I really want to get as much as I can out of the provided test patterns. If there are more intermediate or advance ways to use any of the test patterns provided on DVE:HD Basics, please let me know.


I hope to receive some useful replies. Thank you in advance.
 

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Greetings


Red and Green Filters ... you can't adjust anything to fix these errors. They are what they are. The filters just help you to ID them ... can't do anything about them without access to color decoders which you do not have.


Three Rules for contrast ...


1. No Clipping

2. No discoloration

3. No eye fatigue


To do white balance, you need to buy instruments to measure the stuff.


Not called DVE HD Basics for nothing.



regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV /forum/post/15463622


Greetings


Red and Green Filters ... you can't adjust anything to fix these errors. They are what they are. The filters just help you to ID them ... can't do anything about them without access to color decoders which you do not have.


Three Rules for contrast ...


1. No Clipping

2. No discoloration

3. No eye fatigue


To do white balance, you need to buy instruments to measure the stuff.


Not called DVE HD Basics for nothing.



regards

Thanks for your short and disheartening reply. However, I am somehow left feeling that you are a "pro calibration only" advocate and not too much a fan of the DYI calibration.
 

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Greetings


No ... I am telling you what you need to know. If you want to do more ... then you need to buy test equipment and learn to do more. The test disc has its limitations.


And what part of my 4000+ posts tells you I am a pro only advocate?


Remember, I used to be where you are today with far fewer resources and I figured it all out myself through research.


And just because you get the CMS right doesn't mean the color decoder will be set up correctly.


regards
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by esdub20 /forum/post/15463737


Thanks for your short and disheartening reply. However, I am somehow left feeling that you are a "pro calibration only" advocate and not too much a fan of the DYI calibration.

I'm a DIY calibrator, and Michael's right. Although he's a pro calibrator, he's been posting here and on other forums and websites for years, helping people like us. There's only so much you can do with a test disc and your Mk.1 eyeball. If you're going for accuracy and the best picture possible, sooner or later, instrumentation (whether a sensor/software combo or an optical comparator for grayscale), as well as more information, will be needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. Mike, my apologies. I meant no harm.


Now...can anyone help me with questions 3 and 4?
 

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Info for setting contrast has been provided. 3


Dynamic this and that should be turned off if you care about image quality.


Gamma should be at -3 ... lowest to get best gamma curve.


DNIE best turned off if you care about image quality.


On my calibrated set ... I have one mode that does use DNIE but it is for casual daytime viewing with lots of ambient light. When it just doesn't matter at all.


Regards
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by esdub20 /forum/post/15464524


Thanks for the replies. Mike, my apologies. I meant no harm.


Now...can anyone help me with questions 3 and 4?

I've just got into calibrating using a sensor, not an expensive model (I1-LT) but considered a good starting point within it's limitations. Having finally been able to do a calibration on my LCD TV and my projector, I've so far only picked a few things up, but hopefully I can pass this little information on.



To access the RGB gains and cuts you will likely have to go into the service menu. In order to adjust them, you will need some kind of sensor as your eyes will not be good enough. If you want a quick and dirty method, read up on the owners thread for your set and see if there is a recommend colour mode (like with my Sony it is 'warm 2' as that is closest to D65). Then adjust your contrast and brightness when in this mode.


I found that when calibrating my TV by eye it seemed like I could turn the contrast all the way up to 100, but using my sensor I found out that settings above 90 actually caused a 100 IRE window to go slightly pink. I can see it now, but the sensor highlighted it for me. You won't get the bleeding effect with an LCD like with a CRT which is how the DVE instructions seem to explain how to set it IIRC. So all I can suggest for setting the contrast is to not go to maximum and with a 100 IRE window look to see if it goes pink, green or blue compared to a 90 IRE window.


Hope this helps.....we're all learning (especially me
).
 

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One other aspect that goes undiscovered until...


A test dvd, be it AVIA, Getgray, Digtal Video Essentials, AVCHD... you put it in your DVD player, and you proceed along, not realizing that what is coming out of your dvd player is not what is coming off the dvd. You do greyscale with one DVD player & compare it to different results using a second dvd player....which dvd player is right? Or are they both off in differing directions? Makes you say ouch...
 

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As far as contrast goes, I believe there is a test pattern on DVE HD Basics designed for use with digital displays which consists of 2 greyscale bars (correct me if I'm wrong), one greyscale bar going from black to white, and the other going from black to white as well, but in the opposite direction, one on top of the other. Find this pattern and do as michael has stated but don't forget that contrast and brightness may impact one another, so you may need to go back and forth between the Pluge and greyscale patterns until you get it right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV /forum/post/15464643


Greetings


Info for setting contrast has been provided. 3


Dynamic this and that should be turned off if you care about image quality.


Gamma should be at -3 ... lowest to get best gamma curve.


DNIE best turned off if you care about image quality.


On my calibrated set ... I have one mode that does use DNIE but it is for casual daytime viewing with lots of ambient light. When it just doesn't matter at all.


Regards


Thanks, Michael. I appreciate the valuable information you've provided.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelvin1965S /forum/post/15464710


I've just got into calibrating using a sensor, not an expensive model (I1-LT) but considered a good starting point within it's limitations. Having finally been able to do a calibration on my LCD TV and my projector, I've so far only picked a few things up, but hopefully I can pass this little information on.



To access the RGB gains and cuts you will likely have to go into the service menu. In order to adjust them, you will need some kind of sensor as your eyes will not be good enough. If you want a quick and dirty method, read up on the owners thread for your set and see if there is a recommend colour mode (like with my Sony it is 'warm 2' as that is closest to D65). Then adjust your contrast and brightness when in this mode.


I found that when calibrating my TV by eye it seemed like I could turn the contrast all the way up to 100, but using my sensor I found out that settings above 90 actually caused a 100 IRE window to go slightly pink. I can see it now, but the sensor highlighted it for me. You won't get the bleeding effect with an LCD like with a CRT which is how the DVE instructions seem to explain how to set it IIRC. So all I can suggest for setting the contrast is to not go to maximum and with a 100 IRE window look to see if it goes pink, green or blue compared to a 90 IRE window.


Hope this helps.....we're all learning (especially me
).

On my Samsung, I am able to access the RBG gains and offsets in addition to adjusting the different colors, such as magenta and cyan, from the users menu. I'm not too familiar with the "IRE window" you speak of, but will do some research later. Thanks for your reply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by me75006 /forum/post/15465373


One other aspect that goes undiscovered until...


A test dvd, be it AVIA, Getgray, Digtal Video Essentials, AVCHD... you put it in your DVD player, and you proceed along, not realizing that what is coming out of your dvd player is not what is coming off the dvd. You do greyscale with one DVD player & compare it to different results using a second dvd player....which dvd player is right? Or are they both off in differing directions? Makes you say ouch...

True. I understand that each source may put out a different signal/picture/etc which is why I stated that I'm using a PS3. My PS3 is the main (only for now) source I am using.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by goku14139268520 /forum/post/15465602


As far as contrast goes, I believe there is a test pattern on DVE HD Basics designed for use with digital displays which consists of 2 greyscale bars (correct me if I'm wrong), one greyscale bar going from black to white, and the other going from black to white as well, but in the opposite direction, one on top of the other. Find this pattern and do as michael has stated but don't forget that contrast and brightness may impact one another, so you may need to go back and forth between the Pluge and greyscale patterns until you get it right.

The test pattern provided on DVE is exactly as you stated. Can you explain in detail the directions given by Michael? Sorry, I'm learning.


Thanks for all support so far.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by me75006 /forum/post/15465373


One other aspect that goes undiscovered until...


A test dvd, be it AVIA, Getgray, Digtal Video Essentials, AVCHD... you put it in your DVD player, and you proceed along, not realizing that what is coming out of your dvd player is not what is coming off the dvd. You do greyscale with one DVD player & compare it to different results using a second dvd player....which dvd player is right? Or are they both off in differing directions? Makes you say ouch...

Which is why if you use different players, you calibrate for each separately... doesn't matter what any 1 player does to your patterns, it'll do the same to your content, so what you're doing is not just calibrating the tv, but the whole signal chain... different player, different calibration...
 

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Nothing that observation and 30 sec can't add to. Turn the contrast up ... watch the boxes disappear ... (condition 1)


If you see all the boxes ... are any white ones pink or yellow or other color ... other than shades of gray? Shades of gray are not green ... #2


Does it hurt your eyes to look at the image ...#3 if it does ... then ...


regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV /forum/post/15472574


Greetings


Nothing that observation and 30 sec can't add to. Turn the contrast up ... watch the boxes disappear ... (condition 1)


If you see all the boxes ... are any white ones pink or yellow or other color ... other than shades of gray? Shades of gray are not green ... #2


Does it hurt your eyes to look at the image ...#3 if it does ... then ...


regards

Awesome. Thanks.


Thanks to everyone on AVS. I NEVER knew what difference a little tweaking of the TV settings can do. I think I'm going to to play with all the TVs at my parents'.
 
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