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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife and I are going to try and finish our basement. Part of these plans include a home theater room.
Attachment 191886

I have roughly a 18'x25' area to work with. I need ideas on where to start. I was thinking about doing a floating floor system but didn't want to break the bank in doing it.

Also wanted two rows of seats, four in front, and two to three in the back with a raised platform. What is a good height for that?

Ideas on screen sizes, locations for speakers, projector, screen, and anything like that will help.
 

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If you are starting with raw unfinished space now is the time to define your sound management goals.


As for keeping sound out I see that the theater space is adjacent to the furnace and it will be important to keep that noise out. If you have hardwood floor above the space keeping the sound of footsteps out may be important.


Keeping sound in is usually an important aspect if you anticipate that other members of the family may be sleeping or engaged in quiet activities while the theater is in operation. Following the links in Dave's post to soundproofingcompany.com will be a good place to start to understand the issues and solutions. Nothing ruins a great theater more than not being able to enjoy it on your schedule.


It is not obvious from you post whether you are planning a closed in room for the theater or if it will open to the rest of the basement. I would recommend closing it in for sound management purposes. Your surround sound will also sound better in a closed space.
 

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To answer your question, yes it will screw up the acoustics. The room will likely have a lot of reverberation. The result will be a muddy sound and the dialog not as clear as an acoustically tuned room. That is unless you intend to hang acoustical treatments covering a portion of the walls. You need to do some more reading before lifting a hammer.


You were planning on putting up a base layer or two of drywall under the beadboard, right?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haacksta /forum/post/19532332


but the trick is convincing my wife...

Sigh, there goes another space with great potential!


In my experience the trick to the WAF (wife acceptance factor) is either seeing (and hearing) a professionally designed space either in person or showing them pictures of well built theaters.


In my case I told the wife I wanted to put fabric on the walls that would hide acoustical treatments and she said NO FRACKIN WAY. I then showed here a picture of Kirk's Uptown Paradiso and she said "how soon can you build me that"?

http://home.comcast.net/~kirkk/uptownparadiso.html
 

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+1 on the WAF as being being way more flexible and bridgeable, when both of you experience a well designed home theater. This will quickly move you beyond misconceptions on things like black ceilings/fabric walls/sand filled stages/ir light dimming to more spousal flexibility.


Of course, you can always try the "Can't I have one room in the house?" line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was thinking of using in-walls on everything except the fronts which I would prefer be floorstanders. Although I would change my mind if I could find an in-wall that was just as powerful. Definitely going to be at least 7.1, maybe 7.2.
 

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How tall is the room? What obstructions are in the theater space?


Any gear already in place? Will you really be using all seven seats, when five or six could be really enough? (allowing for a smaller theater and less equipment demands...)


Budget?


Riser height should be derived from the seats used, plus the screen size and screen height. Ideally your seated front row eyes should fall about 1/3rd the way up the screen height. The seated riser eyes should end up with clear sight lines to the bottom of the screen. The taller the screen, the taller the riser. Basically, everything effects everything but the starting point is the seating. Once you start locking down some decisions, other decisions start to fall into place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Really the only obstruction would be an ac duct. My solution to that was to build around it by making a recessed area in the ceiling. I was thinking of maybe just two recliners on the riser and maybe a love seat on the first row.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As far as budget goes, its hard to say. We were going to just play that by ear. I already have a full klipsch system with a 567 yamaha receiver but we are thinking we will just leave that stuff where it is and get all new equipment. I work at Best Buy so I can get some pretty deep discounts on equipment, especially cables and accessories.
 

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Fortunately, my wife was already on board with the idea of a dedicated room but it helped seal the deal by bringing her to a local home theater shop that had a nice dedicated room built in their space. You might check to see if you have any in your area.


Depending on your budget, I think you could definitely find some great in-walls to use in the front, particularly if that's a selling point for the wife. Do a search in the speaker forum. Some good ones include Triad, Atlantic Technology, RBH and Definitive Technology.


Have you given any thought to a false wall with acoustically transparent screen, which would allow you to put your speakers behind the screen? To your long list of decisions, you also need to add screen format (16:9 vs. scope).


Two quick reads on speaker placement:
http://www.dolby.com/consumer/setup/...ide/index.html

http://www.thx.com/consumer/home-ent...peaker-set-up/


There is certainly a wealth of information on this forum, so stick around, ask lots of questions and enjoy the ride.
 

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If you keep the theater large, horns are a better choice then tweeters.


The theater could be narrowed, and the reduced headroom space could be used as a hallway for the theater entry. I'd learn towards keeping the room full width, but it's another option.


So if you soffit the AC ductwork, how much headroom does that leave you? You have a very nice area to work with, but I don't see any hard/fast numbers regarding the room's height.
 

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.2 is really only still .1. But multiple subs are a pretty good tool and have a lot of benefits.


So 10" of soffit depth, but how wide?



The Mrs really wants the bead board? Then educate her. Ask her if THAT exact "look" is more important then the sound quality, and do some research on slap echoes. There's a good chance she won't be using the theater in the long term, because of the bead board and messed up sonics. Her hearing is better then ours, and women are less tolerate of poor sound, then men. Especially if she can't hear dialog clearly. Pretty sure the Mrs armed with that knowledge, might start rethinking her position, and you two can move on to finding a better solution that works better for each of you.


The AT screen and front wall is a great suggestion worth looking into, and you have the enough depth to accomodate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The duct is 18" wide and the expands to 2', if you look at the image at the top of the thread it shows exactly where it is and the dimensions of it.


Also, thanks to everyone so far for your help.
 
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