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I'm currently looking for my first projector. Working on a limited budget I need to find something under $2000 hopefully new rather than used. I would like input as to which models and/or which websites I could look at to find a good deal, obviously I don't expect great things out of such a projector, but something I can watch movies with http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif
 

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I strongly agree, reasinis I personaly sold all my previus projector at projectorcentral and they where in meticulus consition.But if you want brand new Projectorpeople has great options. Give a call to Kirk the foneis 18006393010 ext 2002. Rick
 

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I suggests these models: Infocus LP425z (SVGA, 900 lumens, DLP, 1000 hr bulb @ $400 ea., 2 yr warranty, z for zoom, Svideo/composite/VGA/component (with VGA->component cable)) for $1500 new, Sony VPL-CX1 (XGA, LCD, 550 lumens, 2000 hr bulb @ $300 ea., 3 yr warranty, zoom, 16:9 mode (4:3 native), Svideo/composite/VGA/component (with VGA->component cable for $70)) for $1850 new from www.electrified.com, Sony VPL-CS3 (identical to the CX1 except its SVGA but brighter bulb at 700 lumens) for $1880, Canon LV5100 (SVGA, 700 lumens, zoom, LCD, Svideo/composite/VGA/separate component (no adapter needed), 16:9 capable (4:3 native)) for $1800 new, Epson Powerlite 50c (SVGA, LCD, 1000 lumens, 1500 hr bulb for $400 ea., similar inputs as the Sony, zoom, 16:9 capable--4:3 native, zoomable) for $2100 new, Mitsubishi SA51 (SVGA, LCD, 1000 lumens, 16:9 capable--4:3 native, 2000 hr bulb for $400, zoomable) for $2100 new, NEC LT150 (no zoom, DLP, 1000 hr bulb for $500 ea., 800 lumens, 16:9 capable, a favorite of this forum for its great pictures) for $2700 at www.avscience.com (at least $3500 elsewhere). Thus, you may not need a used or refurb. unit when new ones are so affordable (relatively). Don't forget your screen will cost money too ($100 to thousands) depending on size, profile, manual vs. electric, gain (brightness reflected, 1.1 is cheapest and higher gain costs more), brand (Da-lite, Bretford, Stewart, etc.), type of fabric (greyhawk, plexiglass, etc.). You must factor in your room size (projecting distance), light control (lower lumens unit needs dimmer condition) and screen size wish (you may not have a long enough room to get the size image you want--14 ft. projection distance = 84"X48" or 96" diagonal 16:9 image). The zoom feature may be important as you can adjust the size better otherwise you'll have to move the unit physically to match the screen. Most people buy the projector first and project on to a wall; then they measure the screen required. You can make your own screen out of a bright white but flat wall or white duck cloth bought from Walmart ($14 for 9 ft. X 5 ft. 16:9 screen) stretched on 10 foot wooden rods from Lowes or Home Depot and hung from ceiling with plant hooks. I actually made my own 9'X5' screen, and prefer the image quality over the manual Bretford 70"X70" 1.1 gain screen which I bought for $97 shipped from www.officeworld.com due to the larger screen size and higher gain (probably 1.3 gain) of the duck cloth. I picked the Sony VPL-CX1 for its XGA, 3 year warranty, and cheaper, longer-life bulb (these add up over the years). My image is great IMHO using very long (which may degrade image quality) 50 ft. Svideo cord (Belkin, silver series from www.cdw.com for $27 shipped) from an old Toshiba, interlaced DVD player. I'm sure there are better projectors and better screens but they'll cost more. Home Theater PC will also improve your image too but has its own inherent hassles (boot up, stability, computer noise, digital pass through may be less quality and harder to get to work with your receiver decoder. Noise wise, all these projectors will be less than 40 db which is noticeable before movie starts but not noticeable once sound track begins (I sit right below my Sony which is mounted on my rear wall on a wall shelf). These units will be small and light (<8 lbs and around 9"X11"X3"). Mounting is another issue as the Sony does not allow rear (backward) or ceiling (upside down) projection due to no image flipping. The others do I believe and they usually offer their own mounts for $300. Their exhaust location is also important: my Sony exhaust out its side so rear wall mounting on shelf is OK but others may have exhause to the rear which will heat up with rear wall mounting. All of these units mention have keystone correction (to correct trapezoid irregularities from projecting off axis) except my Sony only corrects for projecting upward but not downward. www.projectorcentral.com has most of the specs and prices. Price search sites like www.pricewatch.com, www.cnet.com, www.streetprices.com, www.pricegrabber.com, www.mysimon.com will help you find the lowest price on the net. As far as HDTV compatibility, all these will accept VGA input which is available as output from the RCA DTC-100 so it should be no problem. These are my humble newbie opinion and I hope it helps. I can't guarantee all info is correct but it's what I recalled. Thanks for listening.


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Huey ;-]
 

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Projector People has the NEC LT85 for $2095 brand new. I've tried pretty much every popular projector new and used around $2K and IMHO you will not get a better picture. Do a search for LT150 (the XGA version) and you'll get more than enough information.


The other way to go would be to look for a used Plus UP1100/Proxima DX1/NEC LT100, use it for a while and then have it modified by Thumper (search here for 'Thumper').


My last Plus UP1100 cost me $1700.


Cheers


Steve


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Steve's Stuff
 
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