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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have calibrated the contrast and brightness levels on my CRT RPTV using Avia and the picture looks great, but I can't help but feel that it is too dark in some scenes.

Dark City comes to mind. I know this is a dark film, but I can't see certain details that I could before and I'm not sure if this is intended or not.


Is there a test I can use to see if I am losing shadow detail?

For instance, on DVD x go to scene y and you should be able to see object z.
 

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Million Dollar Baby

UnderWorld


Are a few recent ones I can think of. What I do is watch the DVD and when you think a scene is too dark, pause it, then crank up the brightness. Go up to see how much detail is lost in black, then move back down until it looks black enough and revealing enough important detail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The problem is that I don't know what detail should be there and what should be hidden.

I tried to set the brightness using the black+half gray pattern on Avia since my set will not hold black level real well. I thought that would be a good compromise.
 

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Thanks for the tips everyone.

What scene in Pirates would you recomend? And what should I look for? Sorry to be a pain, but if I don't know what detail I'm looking for, then I won't know if it's missing :)
 

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jems,

You'll never know what you are missing or supposed to see until you have the greyscale of your TV calibrated to D65K. This is usually done by a ISF tech. DVDs are mastered to D65K (the CRT monitors used during one part of the "mastering process" are calibrated to D65K). When calibrated to D65K you see what the operator saw or intended for you to see. Or, I guess you could go watch some DVDs on a display calibrated to D65K and then go back and try to match what you saw from memory.


larry
 

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Larry,

Actually my set has been recently ISF calibrated to D65k, but I still feel it is lacking in shadow detail. That is why I am so concerned.

Do the brightness and contrast levels affect the grayscale?


Scenes with a low APL seem overly dark. Scenes with a mid to high APL look great.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunspot
Do the brightness and contrast levels affect the grayscale?
It does not affect the temperature. Or at least is should not.
 

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Quote:
What scene in Pirates would you recomend? And what should I look for?
Inside the ship scenes and when they are in the caves with the cortez's gold chest scene, there should be a lot of detail everywhere.
 

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Quote:
Do the brightness and contrast levels affect the grayscale?
Of course it does. Brightness is black level and contrast is white level. The range between black and white is the "grayscale". "Color temperature" is measured at intervals along the grayscale from black up to white. If your TV was ISF calibrated using your current DVD player on the same input on which it is now connected you should be all set. The only limitations you will have are the capabilities of your player and TV. Once you switch sources or inputs the calibration is not valid because not every source or input will behave exactly the same way. Other calibrations done to the TV that don't depend on the input source (convergence is one) won't be affected by switching sources or inputs. There's a thread in the CRT PJ forum that, IIRC, refers to gamma in the title but it has some good info on grayscale and color temp. Or a search here or on google will turn up other links too.


larry
 

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Just one title: Panic Room


Dark City is darker than it really should be. The theatrical prints I saw had a lot more shadow detail than the dvd.
 
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