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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a layout of my room:

http://www.eden.rutgers.edu/~mikekao/Roomsetup.JPG


As you can see, it is rather odd shaped room, and not near ideal for an HT environment.


Well I already purchased a Buttkicker II and plan on upgrading to an SVS sub (possibly dual-SVS) and I already I forsee problems with placement. As you can see, all my corners are already taken. I have heard however, from several audiophiles that corner-loaded subs produce boomy distorted bass. How true is this statement? What would you guys suggest I do (with 1 and/or Two SVS's)? If necessary I can clear out the right rear corner of my room for an SVS or two, or perhaps may push out my equipment rack to fit a single sub in the front right corner... if I get two, would I experience destructive interference if I place one on each side of my bed or 1 on each side of my computer desk?


Also going back to the Buttkicker II, I was wondering if I can get some suggestions on installing it in the room. I was originally planning to mount it vertically on the underside of my bed (which has a wooden platform supported by two hollowed rectangular wooden pieces on both ends), but I'm afraid all of the tactile force will be limited to the bed and won't transfer to the room. Should I instead lay a wooden slab on the floor nailing it the the bed supports and install the BKII rightside up on this platform? Should I invest in rubber isolation products for either types of installations even though the room is carpeted?


Also, what acoustic/sonic problems might I encounter b/c of the side entrance opening of my room? Should I be concerned with this, and how should this effect the placement of my subwoofer? Would be better if I place the subwoofer somewhere in the back towards the left so less waves get 'stuck' in that front left corner? Perhaps someone with room-optimization software can help me out with placement? I realize that sub placement isn't my only problem; my front speakers are probably a bit close and my rears aren't exactly perfectly level (right rear is about half a foot lower - left-rear being about 6'6" off the ground w/ the right right rear at 6')... argh, it's acoustic HELL!


If you guys could help me out I'd greatly appreciate it. Any other furniture or speaker placement, or any other room setup suggestions are welcomed!
 

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First choice, move the equipment rack to the left of the left speaker (next to the door), then put the sub in the front right corner.


Second choice, get some wall-mounted shelving and put the sub in left rear corner. Or put the printer on a wall-mounted shelf and put the sub in the right rear corner. You need to re-claim some of that floor space, my friend! :)
Quote:
I have heard however, from several audiophiles that corner-loaded subs produce boomy distorted bass. How true is this statement?
Boomy, perhaps. Distorted? Ya gotta wonder about some of those guys.


Bottom line, corner placement is preferable. With corner placement expect measurements to reveal one or two response peaks (that’s the “boomy†thing they’re talking about). However, these can be tamed with a parametric equalizer. Forget what you’ve heard about moving a sub around the room looking for that “magic†spot. That’s for people who don’t have an equalizer for their sub. What happens is they settle for response characteristics they can live with at the expense of SPL level and extension. EQ the sub and then you can have it all: The highest SPL levels, the lowest extension, and the smoothest response.


One SVS sub is enough sub for a room 3-4 times the size of yours. Two SVS’s? Are you trying to blow out the walls? :D


Regards,

Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by madcowz
...Also going back to the Buttkicker II, I was wondering if I can get some suggestions on installing it in the room. I was originally planning to mount it vertically on the underside of my bed (which has a wooden platform supported by two hollowed rectangular wooden pieces on both ends), but I'm afraid all of the tactile force will be limited to the bed and won't transfer to the room.
Why would you want to transfer any of the tactile force to the room? It seems to me that ideally tactile transducers should be installed directly to the seating to get the maximum effect.


The Buttkickers that I have are too large to attach directly inside my two loveseats, so I attached them to platforms that were isolated from the concrete floor of my home theater by toilet bowl plungers. Here's a picture of the arrangement for one of the loveseats. Buttkicker Tactile Transducer


However, in your case it seems to me you have an ideal arrangement in that the transducer can be attached directly to your bed without being seen.


Larry
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So if I mount the Buttkicker on the underside of the bed will I need isolators between the bed supports and carpeted floor or is this only recommended for hardwood/concrete flooring?
 

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madcowz:


I don't think you will need vibration isolators, although the carpet and carpet pad will provide some isolation.


Larry
 
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