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Hello everyone, I have been reading the messages on this board for a week now and have been unable to find a clear answer about the specifications required of a FP CRT to display 1080i. I have been able to learn from this group that there is a difference between being able to "display" and to "fully resolve" the 1080i or 720P signal. So assuming that my minimum requirement would be to "display" 1080i what would I need to look for in a projector. I have a feeling that the projector will need the correct inputs (although I'm not sure what they are), a minimum hroizontal and vertical scan rate (again don't know what the minimum would be), specific CRT isze (will 7" do or is 8"-9" required), something about a line doubler or HTPC (I have a lot to learn). I'm sure there are more minimum requirements but I don't know what they are. Can all projectors display a 16:9 image?


I would like to purchase a used CRT projector over the next month to primarily watch DVDs but would like to start watching the HDTV OTA signals from Baltimore and Washington.


I know these are basic questions but this is my first post and I hope to learn a lot from this group.
 

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The short and quick answer:


The two HDTV standards used widely are:


1080i/60Hz: requires a horiz. scan rate of 33.75Khz.

720p/60Hz: requires a horiz. scan rate of 45Khz.


Make sure the projector you buy can scan to at least 45Khz and you'll be fine. Any Data Grade projector will do this.


As you mentioned, how good the image will actually look depends on the projector, though any data grade projector will most likely look vastly improved running either HDTV rate vs. a regular NTSC signal.


On my BG800 (does 92Khz) the difference is night & day...


For DVD watching I use line tripled (720p) at 72Hz. This gives me a horiz. scan rate of 54Khz which is higher then HDTV.


Kal
 
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