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Hey guys, I want to set up a BYT this summer so I've been doing a lot of reading and have figured out that I want to a 16 x 9 ft screen with a rear projection setup. I'm unsure of which projector to get though. I'll be showing movies during the evening and at night, so I need something with enough lumens to light up a screen of that size as the sun is setting or has just set. I have budgeted $10,000 for the projector, but am willing to go up to $18,000 if I need to. I'll be using the Open Air Cinema inflatable screen.

http://openaircinema.us/outdoor-mov...o-screens/16-open-air-pro-screen#.VTcOTZY8LCQ

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Hey guys, I want to set up a BYT this summer so I've been doing a lot of reading and have figured out that I want to a 16 x 9 ft screen with a rear projection setup. I'm unsure of which projector to get though. I'll be showing movies during the evening and at night, so I need something with enough lumens to light up a screen of that size as the sun is setting or has just set. I have budgeted $10,000 for the projector, but am willing to go up to $18,000 if I need to. I'll be using the Open Air Cinema inflatable screen.

http://openaircinema.us/outdoor-mov...o-screens/16-open-air-pro-screen#.VTcOTZY8LCQ

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Hi - I'm using a Canon Realis WUX6000 for my outdoor theater at 16x9, from about 25 feet. Can be found new for under 4k with standard lens (+ rebate good for a second/spare lamp). It's 6k lumens. I am very happy with it for outdoor and large screen.
 

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Hi - I'm using a Canon Realis WUX6000 for my outdoor theater at 16x9, from about 25 feet. Can be found new for under 4k with standard lens (+ rebate good for a second/spare lamp). It's 6k lumens. I am very happy with it for outdoor and large screen.
I think this is a phenomenal option. The use of a 6,000 lumen rated projector on a screen that's almost 150 square feet is a great way to go. Spending $10,000 on an outdoor setup isn't going to yield much more once you have that screen, you just need a decent 1080p solution to fill it, and the Canon should deliver on that promise.

It's kind of a unique product since it's using LCoS technology which traditionally has better native contrast and lower inter-pixel gap. You get a very smooth, film-like image, but delivering it with so many lumens really should make it pop.

Once it's setup, invite me over! I want to see what you have.

Don't forget the audio.
 

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We've been in the outdoor projection business since 2005 and have tested dozens of projectors during that time. 6000 lumens is way too bright and will cause eye strain/headaches for some viewers if operated at full power. Nominally, you should be looking at 2300 DLP lumens for a theater-dark environment or 3600 DLP lumens for moderate levels of ambient light.

For DILA, you can go with half that: we're not sure why as the physics don't seem to make sense -- but the eye "reads" DILA lumens differently from DLP (just as DLP reads differently from LCD). But just to prove the point: we sold one of our professional-grade 16' x 9' outdoor screen systems to one of the top producers in Hollywood, and the results he gets from a 1300 lumens JVC are nothing short of phenomenal. Note: JVC also has a 1700 lumens model (DLA-F110E) that never really sold well and has since been discontinued -- but if you look on eBay, you might be able to find one.

In any event: short of using something similar to our $75K DayView screen system, even our 11K lumens projector won't let you see all that much on screen until your screen is completely covered by shade.

Having worked with lots of different brands, we have also found that not every projector performs reliably outdoors. Some brands will shut down even in a light breeze: if the projector's exhaust fan is inhibited from turning freely, the built-in thermal safety sensor will shut down the lamp.

That's why there are only three brands we recommend as all have thoroughly tested and consistently work reliably in all types of conditions: JVC, Panasonic, and Optoma. The latter provides a wide range of surprisingly affordable 1-chip DLP 1080P projectors that deliver great quality and are surprisingly affordable. As for Panasonic: the 3-chip projectors are going to be too expensive for your price range, but there's one single-chip in particular we strongly recommend: the PT-RZ670. We were involved in early testing, and were truly stunned by the picture quality!

In any event, have fun!
 
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