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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Panasonic DVD recorder (DMR-HS2), I think the format of the output discs is "DV-R." I have a choice between (1) making a VHS tape and converting it to PAL VHS format, or (2) Making the DV-R disc and sending it directly to Australia. PAL is the video standard over there.


Do I need any special equipment to convert the output DV-R disc to a format that they can read? My understanding is there is a special code required corresponding to the part of the world where it's going to be used.


This is supposed to be an audition for a music school I want to attend in Sydney.
 

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I have a coupla of friends in Oz, and most (if not all) of the DVD players made there in the past few years are multi-standard and will play back NTSC discs properly.. furthermore, unlike the 'tunnel vision' manuf. here.. the TV's in OZ are multi standard as well (accept PAL or NTSC).


Even tho PAL is the 'official' standard, you will find many commercial DVD's issued in OZ are released in NTSC(!). So I would just do the NTSC disc and see what happens...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There seems to be some confusion here. The NTSC and PAL standards apply to the ANALOG signal output to the TV monitor. DVD refers to "digital video" However a DVD unit in Oz would have to know which type monitor output signal to send.


NTSC and PAL does NOT refer to the standard of encoding put onto the video disc. That's what I am concerned about here, whether the school in Oz can actualy read the disc. I am sure that if they could read it, the output signal would be appropriate for their TV monitors.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by billsincl
NTSC and PAL does NOT refer to the standard of encoding put onto the video disc. That's what I am concerned about here, whether the school in Oz can actualy read the disc. I am sure that if they could read it, the output signal would be appropriate for their TV monitors.
billsincl, I'm afraid you are GROSSLY misinformed if you believe that.


there is no confusion here... I understood EXACTLY what you said and said EXACTLY what I ment.


the data on the DVD is MPEG2. MPEG2 can be encoded in either PAL or NTSC. A 'normal' R2/R4 disc is PAL MPEG2. Multistandard Players can play back EITHER properly and output EITHER PAL or NTSC (as the disc is encoded). Some multistandard players can convert PAL to NTSC or NTSC to PAL.


The ANALOG portion is what you feed into the monitor and can be EITHER PAL or NTSC. When using a multistandard player and/or a multistandard TV, this has little to do with what is encoded on the DVD.


A Multistandard Player (as are common everywhere but NA, and for sure are common in OZ) can play either PAL or NTSC.


A Multistandard Player MAY be able to convert NTSC to PAL and vice-versa.


A Multistandard TV can accept EITHER PAL or NTSC, and most sets in OZ are multistandard.


AS I SAID. I have sent MANY 'homemade' NTSC DVD's to friends in OZ and they players without problem have played on their TV's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There may be multistandard plyers in Australia that can play either, but this music school insists upon getting the VHS in the PAL format. I was hoping that by making a DVD at home, I can avoid the expense of having to take it to a video lab and converting it first and send the disc instead.


Perhaps when you say that the DVDs are either PAL or NTSC, you mean that they can supply either analog output. Both standards were invented long before video discs were invented, so there would be no association with the way the digital data is encoded. I wonder what standard the old movie laser discs used? Did the producers have to use a different format when they shipped the discs to Australia?
 

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comparing VHS/DVD is apples and oranges.


ONE MORE TIME


PAL/NTSC also applies to the encoding of the video data on the DVD.


PAL is 720x577 25fps

NTSC is 720x480 29.97fps

(before someone corrects me, let's leave film/progressive out of the issue for a moment)


ALL DVD's are encoded in the same STUCTURE, but the VIDEO DATA is either PAL/NTSC.


altho there are mutistandard VHS decks that can do either PAL or NTSC (and convert internally from one to the other), they are not that common in the 'real' world and are onthe expensive side, so their requirement that the tape be PAL VHS is not unusual. Their television MAY be dual format (PAL/NTSC) but the VHS deck IS NOT.


GENERALLY any DVD Player is capable of playing back EITHER PAL or NTSC encoded discs, and outputting, in ANALOG, whatever format the disc is encoded in (PAL or NTSC), AND many multistandard players will INTERNALLY convert the disc from whatever format the disc is in (PAL/NTSC) to the required ANALOG output (PAL>NTSC, NTSC>PAL). You can get a $39 Norcent at WalMart that will do that.


(region coding is NOT an issue on a disc you make yourself).


If nothing else, find out if -


a) their television will display a NTSC signal if fed on by their DVD players (again I say.. it it becomming more common that DVD's being issued in OZ are NTSC .


b) if their TV will not handle an NTSC signal, then find out what DVD player they are using and check it out over on www.vcdhelp.com and see if it will convert NTSC>PAL


c) make the disc and mail it NOW, and let them test it on their equipment. If it works, great, if not, THEN go the expense of making the tape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Unfortunately, the tape will be viewed by more than one person, so I would have to find a common format for all the viewers. It appears that the only safe way to go is convert the VHS tape to PAL. I wonder if I can even find a video lab around here that can do the wok for me.


I scanned the Toshiba document "What is DVD?" and as you said, the frame rates and sizes are different between PAL and NTSC, but they do use the same algorithms for the compression. It's just a question of setting the parameters.


What about SECAC? Are they just out of luck in those countries? Maybe that format is disappearing.
 

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SECAM, not SECAC :), generally an 'over the air' system and not on any DVD's. Sorta a '******* child' mix of PAL/NTSC and stupidity.


I still believe you should make a disc and send it over, then if there is any problem you can have the tape converted. I would almost bet money that they WOULDN'T have a problem.


if you plan on doing this a lot or need to have multiple copies, and you don't want to send a disc ONCE and find out if it is a problem, you may well want to get yourself a converting deck and record the PAL tapes yourself from the NTSC input. Look about on ebay for a Samsng SV-5000W for around $300 and you can feed it NTSC and make PAL.. usual rates for a decent lab to do it for you will run $40-$50 PER HOUR of tape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, this is a one-time endeavor, so maybe the video lab would be the most economical. My main concern is being to test their work BEFORE paying them for it. How do I know if they did an acceptable job before I send it? I don't have a way to test it myself.


I appreciate your comments and advice.
 

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in reality...


you may be able to get them to let you see it when you go pick it up.

otherwise.. you have to take their word for it.
 
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