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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My need for cat5 lines exceeds the number of lines going to the panel box. Network switches are much cheaper and easier than running new lines. My firewall and cable modem is at the panel box. I'd like to place switches in some rooms to cascade the number of connections. Is there any limit to the 'depth' of switches. For example, lets say I put an 8 port switch in the office, and use the existing wire to the 4 port router, that should not be a problem, correct. Suppose I want to put another switch between the switch and the router, so that the office is now 2 switches away. Would that be a problem?


SM
 

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Depends on the switch. Assuming this is a layer 2 switch, it remembers the MAC address of each computer on every port, then sends out the packets only to that port. So IF the switch is stackable and you do not exceed the max number of clients supported at the highest level switch, you should be okay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What's a level 2 switch?

How do I know if it is a level 2 switch?

What's a level 3 switch?

What's a "workgroup" switch?
 

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If it has an uplink port, and you've got less than 255 clients, you're probably fine. Can't make any guarantees though. I've got my Linksys Wireless AP+Router+Switch connected to another Linksys Router+Switch. The uplink port on the AP+R+S is connected to one of the standard ports on the R+S. It sounds like a mess but works fine.


You could always go wireless for most things and reserve the Cat5 connections for those machines that need the extra bandwidth.
 

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Most switches these days are layer 2 swithces, including those "workgroup" switches and cheap (12,000 addresses. (each pc or device w/NIC has a MAC address.)


Unless you're going to have 12000+ devices on your network, you should be fine.


BTW, layer 2 of the OSI model is the Media Access Control layer, i.e. ethernet

Layer 3 is transport i.e TCP/IP.
 

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Layer 3 is Network, as in IP

Layer 4 is Transport, as in TCP (or UDP)


Layer 3 Switching is a term you might see, but isnt something you need nor you will find cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cool. My goal is to have my HT closet, and office server on a gigabit network. My HT closet only has one wire, but I need 4 connections. So I wanted to stack two inexpensive gigabit switches. So the LAN will all be gigabit, connected just one port of the router/firewall. So the deepest connection will be WAN->router->8 port switch->5 port switch.
 
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