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I'm starting to pull my Hair out, lol.
At this point, I'd start looking elsewhere, for example, the Router.
The ASUS AC-3100 has known Issues, just google "ASUS AC-3100 Speed Issues".
Perhaps the Firmware on the Router could be updated. I'm not a big Fan of Asus, I admit.

I sold hundreds of TP-Link Routers and the are fast, reliable, almost bullet-proof. They don't cost an Arm and a Leg and you could always return the Router if you keep the Box.
What say you?
Worth a try?
Wish I still had hair to pull out. There's some, but I'd need forceps.

The Asus replaced a Nighthawk which did work rather well. The Asus was free, so I figured I'd give it a shot. I can always swap the Nighthawk back in and try that. I'm obsessive about keeping things up to date and probably check the firmware a couple times a month. (That was the mistake with the Intel WiFi card.. I let Intel install the latest driver, which wrecked everything. Rolling back a version fixed all but the file transfer across the network).

Not knowing routers as intimate as I do video equipment, I'd think on the surface a problem with the router would affect more than just one computer.

I DO like the Asus' ability to run a VPN. Though I currently have that disabled.

I like the Netgear's dual 5Ghz radios. Allowed me to split phones and computers between the two, with all the usual "smart" lights, thermostats and so forth living on the 2.4Ghz band as it is with the Asus.

I may try the TP-Link. Amusingly, I might still have a couple of those in a box, somewhere, though nothing current.

Doc
 

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Network engineer here. IF you have questions, post them. I will do my best to answer them. I've learned a lot from these forums and figure I should give back!

Very cool. I wish I'd seen this/taken you up on this offer *before* last weekend, but that's my own fault...


I bought a Netgear Nighthawk R7000 back in 2015, and it was *really* good to me for about 3.5 years worth of use. Fantastic speed and range. Super-reliable. I recommended it to anyone that asked me. I bought it for others in my family (father; sister-in-law; etc) as Christmas gifts when I heard people were having WiFi/networking problems or shortcomings.


But over the last 4ish months my network has become pretty unreliable. Over the last week the failures/dropouts/reboots are becoming more and more frequent. I'm not sure if it's just failing hardware (I would have expected to get more than 4 years worth of good use out of a pretty-well-reviewed mid-to-higher-end-ish offering from a "brand" like Netgear), or it's related to increasing-demand/usage related to my growing list of "attached devices" and "internet of things" (a couple dozen hue lights, a half dozen smart speakers, a half dozen "whole-home-audio-music streamers," a half dozen streaming media players, phones and laptops for me and the wife, tablets for the kids, etc etc etc)...



I took advantage of a Cyber Monday deal on a TP-Link AX6000 WIFI-6 router with MU-MIMO and OFDMA, in hopes that my problems are either related to:
- better management of my growing list of attached devices
- just general hardware failure (bad luck on my part; rolled snakeeyes)?

Problems/glitches first started rearing themselves the very first Saturday this fall of College Football, where I have a pretty elaborate basement setup that involves the ability to watch many (6+) college football games at the same time using a combination of the internet (Comcast's online streaming service) and my intranet (CableCard HDHomeRun DVR networked tuners)... for September and October glitches/reboots/unreliability was only experienced during those heavy-usage Fall Saturdays. But at this point I'm experiencing drop-outs during what I'd call "normal usage" (1-person Netflix streaming last night on our main living room TV; over-the-weekend two or three simultaneous FLAC music streams).

Any thoughts/opinions you have on best-practices or the liklihood that I've taken the proper steps by buying a new WiFi 6 router with MU-MIMO and OFDMA, or if there's something else I should be doing in parallel, would be greatly appreciated...
 

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Very cool. I wish I'd seen this/taken you up on this offer *before* last weekend, but that's my own fault...


I bought a Netgear Nighthawk R7000 back in 2015, and it was *really* good to me for about 3.5 years worth of use. Fantastic speed and range. Super-reliable. I recommended it to anyone that asked me. I bought it for others in my family (father; sister-in-law; etc) as Christmas gifts when I heard people were having WiFi/networking problems or shortcomings.


But over the last 4ish months my network has become pretty unreliable. Over the last week the failures/dropouts/reboots are becoming more and more frequent. I'm not sure if it's just failing hardware (I would have expected to get more than 4 years worth of good use out of a pretty-well-reviewed mid-to-higher-end-ish offering from a "brand" like Netgear), or it's related to increasing-demand/usage related to my growing list of "attached devices" and "internet of things" (a couple dozen hue lights, a half dozen smart speakers, a half dozen "whole-home-audio-music streamers," a half dozen streaming media players, phones and laptops for me and the wife, tablets for the kids, etc etc etc)...



I took advantage of a Cyber Monday deal on a TP-Link AX6000 WIFI-6 router with MU-MIMO and OFDMA, in hopes that my problems are either related to:
- better management of my growing list of attached devices
- just general hardware failure (bad luck on my part; rolled snakeeyes)?

Problems/glitches first started rearing themselves the very first Saturday this fall of College Football, where I have a pretty elaborate basement setup that involves the ability to watch many (6+) college football games at the same time using a combination of the internet (Comcast's online streaming service) and my intranet (CableCard HDHomeRun DVR networked tuners)... for September and October glitches/reboots/unreliability was only experienced during those heavy-usage Fall Saturdays. But at this point I'm experiencing drop-outs during what I'd call "normal usage" (1-person Netflix streaming last night on our main living room TV; over-the-weekend two or three simultaneous FLAC music streams).

Any thoughts/opinions you have on best-practices or the liklihood that I've taken the proper steps by buying a new WiFi 6 router with MU-MIMO and OFDMA, or if there's something else I should be doing in parallel, would be greatly appreciated...
@psuKinger, I use TP-Link exclusively, since 2010.
Before, I did use Netgear, but reliability, warranty issues and non-existent Tech support drove me away.

I install TP-Link Routers in large Beauty Salons (~15-20.000 SqFt.) together with Ubiquity access points.
Some of these Salons are 100+ Miles away, and I cannot afford going back to these locations to re-set or replace Routers.
I have done about 30 Salons right now, up and down the West coast, from San Diego to Ventura county.

My point is: TP-Link is a very reliable product. Perhaps it was just bad luck on your end.
Another Fact is that I am using the lower End Routers from TP-Link, like the Archer 1740 or 1900.
Less Features, less problems.

I'd call TP-Link Tech support, yes there are real Folks to talk to, very helpful Techs, they might point you in the right Direction.
Cheers,
 

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@DrDon,
You'd be amazed how many options you have on a simple TP-Link Router. Including VPN.
Give it a try, it won't hurt a bit.:D
It'll be on my list, for sure.

Following my last post and the inability to attach one of the antenna wires to the Intel WiFi card, I purchased a Netgear AC 1900 external adapter. Figured I'd use it while looking for a new antenna assembly for the 910. The Netgear works amazingly well w/r/t laptop-to-router speed and internet speeds. It also brought the file transfer speeds to nearly double. Still not what the 920 does, but better.

This afternoon, I decided to try some microsurgery on the antenna leads and managed to remove the broken-off copper ring from the Qualcomm card from inside the antenna cable's connector. With the antennas properly connected, the new Intel Card performs very well. Not as good as the Netgear, but better than the Qualcomm.

Again, thanks. Hope you don't mind if I continue to lurk and learn things.

Doc
 

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For the networking experts, I’d appreciate a little advice. I currently have Gigabit service and am completing my home theater. The theater rack has 2 Cat6 cables running from the modem to the rack approximatelly 50 feet away. My question is in regards to switches. I plan to install a 1U rack mount switch, most likely 16-24 ports (more than I need). The only requirements are that the switch has to have rear ports to plug in the ethernet cables. The question is specifically do I want a managed or unmanaged switch? Within reason, cost isn’t much of an option, I just want something that I purchase once and never worry about again. Thoughts?
 

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For the networking experts, I’d appreciate a little advice. I currently have Gigabit service and am completing my home theater. The theater rack has 2 Cat6 cables running from the modem to the rack approximatelly 50 feet away. My question is in regards to switches. I plan to install a 1U rack mount switch, most likely 16-24 ports (more than I need). The only requirements are that the switch has to have rear ports to plug in the ethernet cables. The question is specifically do I want a managed or unmanaged switch? Within reason, cost isn’t much of an option, I just want something that I purchase once and never worry about again. Thoughts?
Ron,
There really isn't a difference in Speed when it comes to managed vs un-managed Switches.
If you are into networking, you may choose the managed Switch to explore your Options, like packets per second or Frames per second,
some other options that I really can't explain in one post, this may take another entire Thread, lol.

So the answer is, if you just want it to work and move on, go with the un-managed Swith.
If you want to explore further and feel adventurous, go with the managed switch.

Stay safe,
 

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For the networking experts, I’d appreciate a little advice. I currently have Gigabit service and am completing my home theater. The theater rack has 2 Cat6 cables running from the modem to the rack approximatelly 50 feet away. My question is in regards to switches. I plan to install a 1U rack mount switch, most likely 16-24 ports (more than I need). The only requirements are that the switch has to have rear ports to plug in the ethernet cables. The question is specifically do I want a managed or unmanaged switch? Within reason, cost isn’t much of an option, I just want something that I purchase once and never worry about again. Thoughts?

Other things to consider: Link Aggregation. If this is main switch and you are running a NAS, it could speed things up a bit. And, POE. Real handy for powering smaller switches in cabinets (one less plug) and cameras.

This is from a novice but, I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express once.
 

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For the networking experts, I’d appreciate a little advice. I currently have Gigabit service and am completing my home theater. The theater rack has 2 Cat6 cables running from the modem to the rack approximatelly 50 feet away. My question is in regards to switches. I plan to install a 1U rack mount switch, most likely 16-24 ports (more than I need). The only requirements are that the switch has to have rear ports to plug in the ethernet cables. The question is specifically do I want a managed or unmanaged switch? Within reason, cost isn’t much of an option, I just want something that I purchase once and never worry about again. Thoughts?
Here is the way I have my network setup:

I have a fiber cable coming into my home from my ISP. The fiber terminates into a media converter which converts light to RJ-45 electrical signals.

I have a cat 6 cable running from the media converter to the WAN input on my Netgear R7800 router.

I run a single cat 6 cable from one of my router LAN ports to an eight port unmanaged switch (call it Main Switch).

From Main Switch, I connect to an ObiTalk200 VoIP phone adapter using cat 6, and to two other unmanaged switches: HT Switch and Office Switch through cat 5e (previously built into the walls in 2008) .

HT Switch is in my HT and connects to my Denon 6200, Oppo 203 and 103, FTV Stick 4K (using USB LAN adapter), and my Tivo Roamio Pro DVR.

Office Switch is in my Home Office and connects to my Desktop computer, Backup server, my printer, an FTV Stick 4K (using USB LAN adapter), and a Tivo Mini (client to the HT Tivo Roamio Pro).

The Main Switch essentially isolates the router's external WAN traffic from internal LAN traffic.

So if I happen to reboot or power cycle the router while streaming across the LAN from my Desktop computer to my Oppo's or I am watching the TV in my office which depends on the LAN connection to the Tivo in the HT, they do not get interrupted.

Of course, any WAN traffic will always require the router to be operating normally.

The only reason I can see to use managed switches is if you require a VLAN setup.

I had a boss who always said "there is elegance in simplicity". Another way of saying this is "keep it simple stupid" (KISS).

BTW, the ObiTalk200 is a wonderful, cheap, little device that allows me to use my google voice phone number for my landline. I paid $50 on amazon, no recurring monthly charges, and free calls within U.S. and Canada. Sometimes Mrs K will call her family in Tokyo and it only costs $0.03 per minute. Audio quality is very good too.
 

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New Questions

STRONG WiFi but cannot stream.....

4000 sq. ft. 2 story house. 3 AC1750 extenders. Netgear Nighthawk 2.4/5 bands - Speed 92 mbps Fiber Optic cable.

New Samsung 82" that is 25 ft. from router always streams very well. Strong signal 5 bands. LG OLED 65" 50 ft. away is "iffy" - sometimes it does stream and some times it does not. 2.4 seems to work a bit more of the time. Evenings are worse. I move the extenders around and I MIGHT get lucky. Always shows great max. signal of 5 bands.

Here is my main concern. Downstairs is my home theater. 118" screen - Epson 5030U projector. New Denon receiver with latest and greatest Roku. STRONG 5 band signal. Was kicking butt for months. Now performance is greatly reduced. Occasionally I can stream during the day. 2.4 or 5 mhz does not seem to make much difference. Extender is located within 10 feet of the Roku.

Question: Since I am getting 5 bands (Excellent) signal strength at all three locations would I be wasting my time and money by buying a different mesh extender setup in the hope that for some unknown reason streaming might commence. I have a load of money invested in my home theater and it would be nice to be able to use it a bit more. Cable channels and Blu-Ray is great but Netflix etc. would be nice as well. Could the problem simply be that there is massive evening use on the streaming services in prime time? If that is the case, then why does my Sammy (near the router) ALWAYS stream fantastically?

Thanks so much for any help that you may offer. The WAF is going waaaaay down since she is very disappointed when we go down to watch a movie and it will not work......HELP!
 

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STRONG WiFi but cannot stream.....

4000 sq. ft. 2 story house. 3 AC1750 extenders. Netgear Nighthawk 2.4/5 bands - Speed 92 mbps Fiber Optic cable.

New Samsung 82" that is 25 ft. from router always streams very well. Strong signal 5 bands. LG OLED 65" 50 ft. away is "iffy" - sometimes it does stream and some times it does not. 2.4 seems to work a bit more of the time. Evenings are worse. I move the extenders around and I MIGHT get lucky. Always shows great max. signal of 5 bands.

Here is my main concern. Downstairs is my home theater. 118" screen - Epson 5030U projector. New Denon receiver with latest and greatest Roku. STRONG 5 band signal. Was kicking butt for months. Now performance is greatly reduced. Occasionally I can stream during the day. 2.4 or 5 mhz does not seem to make much difference. Extender is located within 10 feet of the Roku.

Question: Since I am getting 5 bands (Excellent) signal strength at all three locations would I be wasting my time and money by buying a different mesh extender setup in the hope that for some unknown reason streaming might commence. I have a load of money invested in my home theater and it would be nice to be able to use it a bit more. Cable channels and Blu-Ray is great but Netflix etc. would be nice as well. Could the problem simply be that there is massive evening use on the streaming services in prime time? If that is the case, then why does my Sammy (near the router) ALWAYS stream fantastically?

Thanks so much for any help that you may offer. The WAF is going waaaaay down since she is very disappointed when we go down to watch a movie and it will not work......HELP!
@hal2626,
I'd get rid of some of those Extenders (even though I love TP-link) and start with one of these:

https://smile.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-UniFi-UAP-AC-LR-Single-Version/dp/B01609AF22/ref=sr_1_8?crid=ID55EMMZTYRT&dchild=1&keywords=ubiquiti+access+point&qid=1586203731&sprefix=Ubiquit,aps,197&sr=8-8

I have used them for many years, and they perform rock-solid.
If they don't work for you, simply return them.
A warning: The setup of these access points are sometimes a bit confusing for the novice users.
See how they perform and report back here.
Stay safe.
 

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@hal2626,
I'd get rid of some of those Extenders (even though I love TP-link) and start with one of these:

https://smile.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-UniFi-UAP-AC-LR-Single-Version/dp/B01609AF22/ref=sr_1_8?crid=ID55EMMZTYRT&dchild=1&keywords=ubiquiti+access+point&qid=1586203731&sprefix=Ubiquit,aps,197&sr=8-8

I have used them for many years, and they perform rock-solid.
If they don't work for you, simply return them.
A warning: The setup of these access points are sometimes a bit confusing for the novice users.
See how they perform and report back here.
Stay safe.
Thank you so much for your reply. I must admit that this seems to be way too complicated and involved for me (with my very limited knowledge) to set up. Do you think that if I went with one of the very highest rated mesh systems that CNET has reviewed recently that I might lessen the problem? I'm a 70 year old ex-bass player and I have been an audio hobbyist since 1974 but this home theater system has been a bit difficult. The audio is another story - SWEET! :eek:
 

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@hal2626,
I'd get rid of some of those Extenders (even though I love TP-link) and start with one of these:

https://smile.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-UniFi-UAP-AC-LR-Single-Version/dp/B01609AF22/ref=sr_1_8?crid=ID55EMMZTYRT&dchild=1&keywords=ubiquiti+access+point&qid=1586203731&sprefix=Ubiquit,aps,197&sr=8-8

I have used them for many years, and they perform rock-solid.
If they don't work for you, simply return them.
A warning: The setup of these access points are sometimes a bit confusing for the novice users.
See how they perform and report back here.
Stay safe.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B085HZDM3B/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 This solved my problems. Works Great!!
 
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