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Discussion Starter #1
i have a small network. i think one of my pc's has a gigabit ethernet nic, but i think the other two do not. my question is would inserting a 5-port gigabit switch into my network do anything for line speed? would it help the 10/100 machines at all?


my main switch is actually a 5-port router (linksys befsr41), how could i improve my line speed?


do they make gigabit routers yet?
 

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I recently purchased a 5 port gigabit switch for my network. I moved all but the boot drive out of my HTPC into a file server located in the unfinished side of my basement. This reduced the noise and heat that was being generated in my HTPC that is located in my Hometheater room.


I was not having any performance issues with my 10/100 ethernet network for file serving of divx (standard defininition) and MPEG2 .ts HDTV streams accross the net. However, I went to gigabit because I moved my "video working" disk also onto the fileserver. So for HDTV2MPEG .ts file manupulation and videoredo ( http://www.videoredo.com ) commercial editing, splicing/joining, etc edit's I did notice a big drop in performance over having the working disk local in the HTPC. Going to gigabit ethernet help here. However, I need to upgrade my fileserver from a AMD K6 400MHz machine to a 2.8GHz Celeron D based server. The AMD just could not keep up with the gigabit traffic.


So for normal streaming playback of video traffic around your net, 10/100 is fine. But if you are doing video editing and lots of multi gigabit HDTV file transfers accross your net, gigabit is great. If you goto gigabit, realize that the CPU of your PC may become your bottleneck and that you should do a search on "jumbo frame" support.


For Internet access of course, the gigabit will not help at all. Your DSL or cable connection is the limiting factor.
 

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The limiting factor for your traffic is how fast your hard drives are, essentially. You're going to need striped RAID to see a benefit over 100 Mbps. Also, the speeds need to be gigabit end to end to see any performance. In other words, a gigabit switch, and a gigabit NIC on either end (not just one end).


I happen to have gigabit since I needed to add a few switches and got some NICs for cheap, but it isn't really benefiting me anything over 10/100. So in summary, keep your 10/100 and stripe your hard drives to get better transfer performance (and separate your OS from your data on different disks).
 

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Argh, you're right. It will benefit somewhat, but especially with striping. I'm thinking of older performance numbers for hard drives. I'm glad though, since I know feel better about my gigabit LAN. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
hhhhmmm...okay, thanks for the info guys. i've got some thinking to do...i do move large files around a lot, but i just don't know if it's worth the investment at this point. thanks again for the reply!
 

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PS Netgear has a pretty cheap gigabit router out now. If you need that kind of performance an extra $100 or so shouldn't break the bank.
 

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from the way you've posted the question....i'm thinkning you don't really have any need for gigabit right now.


don't waste your dollars on tecnology you don't need right now.


it only gets better and cheaper with time.


buy it when you have an identifiable need for it.


do you currently have any performance issuea with your LAN..if so, what are they?
 

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It was stated, "the speed needs to be gigabit end to end to see any performance." Not necessarily true.


Depending on the application, you may see a performance improvement with 100M on one end, a Gigabit Ethernet switch, and Gigabit Ethernet on the other end. This might occur in a client-server application, for example. If you have your server connected at Gigabit Ethernet and multiple clients at 10/100, it would allow the sum of the client traffic to exceed 100Mbps -- thereby improving performance by eliminating the bottleneck to the server.


This doesn't really change anything, though; I agree with the suggestion to not bother with the upgrade unless there is a clear need.
 

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Okay, I suppose I can't assume anything here... What I guess I should've said is, "the speed needs to be gigabit end to end to see any performance gains between those two ends"... You're right that any machine that has a gigabit NIC and connected to a gig switch will benefit by handling multiple 100 connections at once.
 

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I think you'll see a benefit of going with gigabit, how much is another story.

100Mbps allows for a max transfer speed of 12.5MB/s, most drives today will exceed that.


What you need to look at is what you use and what type of transfer speed is necessary.
 

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I am quite satisfied that I went to gigabit. I can't even come close to maxxing it out but can get a pretty consistent 30-35MB/s between my clients and server. The switch cost me mabye 30$ more than a cheapo 10/100 but it was ohhh so worth it. Dell has some great fairly cheap gbit switches which I've been eyeing for expansion. I went with the SMC 8508T (the defacto standard IMO) and it's great but only 8 ports. I won't use dlink/linksys stuff anymore there. I found middling performance with their 100mbit stuff and see no reason limit the setup for a very small difference in cash.

-Trouble
 

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I am upgrading my server to gigabit. My 10/100 is fine for streaming as many as 3 video files at the same time, but if I kick off a lorage file transfer, the streaming video begins to stutter. Since the issues is the traffic to t he server, upgrading it to gig should resolve the problem. as far as gigabit switches, the SMC switches are under $100 and support jumbo frames. most lower cost switches do not support jumbo frames.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833129028


also remeber you need at least cat5e to see the best results. cat 6 is recommended. cat5 works, but isn't optimal.
 
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