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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently tried to upgrade my HTPC by changing out the motherboard, ABIT BH-6 to an ABIT BE6-II. My plan was to use my old Celeron processor for a while then upgrade to a PIII-733. Anyway, my plan went wrong when to my amazement I was not able to get my CRT to sync-up with my freshly built HTPC. The picture would either have a horizontal roll or a quirky jump. I can’t understand what would cause this. I am using all the same components except the motherboard. For the record I am using Win98SE, WinDVD2.35, Asus GeForceMX TwinView, and I installed the same nvidia drivers. My projector is an old GE310 Imager that I run at 640X480. So my question: is the motherboard bios or some other characteristic of the new motherboard causing my problem? Anyone have any ideas on how to remedy my situation so I can proceed with my upgrade? Thanks for any input.


Will
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Brian,

Your right about windows installing all those new motherboard devices. I did go ahead and do all my video set-up on a standard monitor including making sure it was at 60Hz. As soon as I hook-up the CRT it starts the jump or roll. Are these "motherboard devices" different from board to board? Could these be effecting something with my video card drivers that cause my timings to be different. Thanks for the advice.


Will
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Brian,

How do I assure that it does not install the same device drivers all over again after I delete them. I don't really understand these "motherboard" device drivers. Are they coming from the Win98 disk? Video drivers,modem drivers,these I have lots of experience with, but these "motherboard drivers" just seem to install themselves somewhere during the installation of the operating system. Do I need to get drivers from the disk that came with the Motherboard? Thanks.


Will
 

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Hi Will:


___Even though the BX chipset boards are very similar, the BE6 II’s onboard HPT controller does take an irq that was not taken before. This adds complexity that apparently windows cannot handle properly from your MB swap. I am sure you saw the many drivers being installed on first boot with the new board once again. A good build practice for new MB’s even if they are using the same chipset is to start from a freshly formatted drive. Given all the time you have spent trouble shooting this problem, you may have had a freshly built and running fine system by now. Also, are you running any of the ACPI/power saving settings from within your BIOS? Kill them off as well as the HPT controller and see if that helps. Setup the ATA66 controller after your system is up and running great.


___Good Luck


___Wayne R. Gerdes

___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.

___ [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wayne,

Actually when I first started this process I completely wiped out the hard drive and started fresh. At this point I have gone back to my OLD motherboard and things are working fine. I want to try again with the new board, but what should I do differently when installing a fresh OS. Do I need to limit or change the device drivers that get loaded? Thanks for your help.


Will
 

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Hi Will:


___First off, it sounds as if you have 2 HD’s? If so, partition the drive that will be used in the BE6 II build so that you can store the latest drivers, BIOS, for the HW to be used as well as the OS and HD installable apps on the D partition. After partitioning, place these “right off the net fresh†drivers, latest BIOS and flash utility, and installable apps in a nicely built directory structure like D:\\Win98 SE Drivers, D:\\Win98 SE BIOS, D:\\Win98 SE Installable Programs, and D:\\Win98 SE. Simply copy over the OS from the installation CD to the D:\\Win98 SE directory. Also, extract the BIOS files from the self-extracting executable or zip file in the BIOS directory. Now you are ready for the build. Since you are having OS troubles, install only the Video card, HD, CD/DVD-ROM drive, and FD. I would not setup the HD on the HPT ATA66 controllers at this point in time because of possible conflicts later. You can later but just not right now … Just connect the single HD to the primary ATA 33 IDE controller and the CD/DVD-ROM drive to the secondary ATA33 controller. I am assuming you have all the peripherals listed above installed into the case and you can get to the BIOS setup screen. Disable the USB and the HPT controllers via BIOS for now. Next, setup the rest of your BIOS for speed or at least to match your SDRAM and CPU to what you currently are using. Kill off the items I listed above as well and you should at least get to the desktop after the OS installation cleanly. I custom install the OS myself but it is not mandatory. This is also a good time to test your OC’ing capabilities because if you are going to see corruption, it is best when the OS is being extracted from the cab’s on the OS installation. Next, boot up using your Win98 SE boot disk. At the A:> prompt, change to the D:\\Win98 SE directory and type “setupâ€. You do not need to install any special Busmastering or other drivers if you are using Win98 SE on the BX chipset so just do not succumb to the temptation to try anything fancy at this point. In fact, throw the MB disk away or at least lock it up. You will use the HPT controller drivers you downloaded off the net later if you decide to use them at all. Let the OS handle all of the HW on installation.


___I am assuming you are to the desktop and if so, you have tested your OC’ed settings somewhat. You can now begin to install the latest drivers for the HW already onboard. Enable DMA on both the HD and CD/DVD-ROM drive and reboot. Install the Nvidia reference 6.50’s and reboot (you can install a lot of the HW drivers in one shot but to many and you may have a mess on your hands). Shut down and install the SC of choice … ( I am hoping you are using a brand name w/ the latest drivers here). On boot, install the drivers for that card and reboot and so on … If you have trouble on the installation of the newer HW, you can always start swapping around the cards in PCI slots to free IRQ’s. You MB manual will tell you the AGP/PCI slot-sharing scheme. You should now have a very nice build of Win98 SE on your hands. Now is a good time to boot up and disable the caches for a BIOS flash. Reboot and hit F8. Boot up using the “Safe Mode Command Prompt Only†selection. At the A:> prompt, change directory to the BIOS flash directory: CD D:\\Win98 SE\\BIOS --> D: --> type the name of the flash utility --> it asks the name of the BIOS file to flash --> asks you to save the old Bios (Yes or no …) --> let it rip. Do not touch the HTPC until you are absolutely sure the flash is complete. Reboot and hit Del. Check that all your settings have not changed and if they have, setup everything in the BIOS once again. Do not enable USB or the ATA66 controllers …


___Now would be a good time to check the CD/DVD-ROM’s firmware and if needed, flash to the latest. If this has been completed, setup the video cards overlay as well as for the drivers for maximum performance. Now is a good time to run a few benches to make sure everything is performing up to expectations. CD Speed, HD Tach, Mad Onions 3D Mark 2000 and Video 2000, Quake III Arena, SiSoft Sandra, Village Mark, and WinTune are all highly recommended at this point. You can use SiSoft Sandra for testing the chips OC’ing capability and to check the setup for verification that all is well http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif If your scores are reasonable for the CPU, HD, SDRAM, and Video card you are using, you can start with loading the HTPC SW. Check the SW DVD players DD and DTS capability, MP3 player’s capability for both MP3’s and CD-Audio. If this all works, you can setup the ATA66 controllers from both the BIOS and the driver install. This is where the problem may come so be prepared for backing out at any sign of trouble. If all goes well, you can than go after enabling USB.


___I think I gave you enough to get you started and you more than likely have already been through most of this. The one last thing I want to mention is that unless you are using an IBM 75GXP, the ATA 66 controller may actually be slower than the BX chipsets native ATA33’s. HD Tach will be a decent indication of this possibility so use it. Burst rates will increase but throughputs will not depending on the HD you are going to use.


___There are quite a few more install tips but again, you should be up and running very nicely. If not, pull various cards until you find the offending HW or check your BIOS in case you have a mis-configuration. Hopefully I did not overlook something which is entirely possible but if so, you will see it as your build from scratch progresses.


___Good Luck


___Wayne R. Gerdes

___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.

___ [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wayne,

Thank you for the detailed instructions. This looks like a weekend project. Based on your experience do you think the motherboard device drivers may have been causing my syncing problems with the CRT? I will do as you say if you think changing these drivers will help. Thanks again.


Will
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
bbq,

The mother board I am talking about is a Slot-1 not a Flip Chip. I think it was one of the last Slot-1 boards that Abit made.


Will
 

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Hi Will:


___This thread sure came out of the past … In either case, did you disable the HPT controllers, reformat the drive, build the OS back up using only freshly downloaded drivers and only one component at a time if you had problems with any of the above?


___The MSI Master 6905 Slot1 to FC-PGA converter is a great device for using an 800 MHz PIII E as an upgrade in case you were interested. As for the last slot 1, Abit just recently made available the I815E based SH6. The reason for this is the possibility of using a Slot1 to .13 micron cored Tualatin in the very near future. Our current I815E/EP’s not including the Shuttle and newer I815E/EP-B boards that BBQ mentioned will be ready for the dustbin when that CPU comes around but Abit may have just found a way to prolong the inevitable from a board that was available a few months back.


___Good Luck


___Wayne R. Gerdes

___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.

___ [email protected]


------------------

New E-Mail address for the time being ... [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wayne,

It sure did come out of the past. I was suprised when I saw my name on the board and I knew I had not posted anything in a long time. Anyway yes I followed your instructions and was able to get the new board working. I bought a PIII 700E as an upgrade to the Celeron300a. Then I went and got the new Radeon LE card and ATI player and it worked so good on my old 300a/MSI6163 combo that I decided to use the newer setup as a work/play computer instead of HTPC. With the ATI player and LE card I see no reason to have anything more than 450Mhz and 128meg RAM. Thanks for all your help on both the board set-up and also the info on the ATI card and player. You are one of the reasons I keep reading this forum. Hope all is well. Thanks


Will
 
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