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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all ! I'm very new here, and new to the world of soundproofing, I spent a lot of days on forum research before posting here and now I just need to cover specifics.


Here is a drawing of what the apartment I just moved in looks like, I chose this one in particular because of many reasons, but the most important one being that I intend to make music (jams, record music, mixing projects) and the room that will serve this purpose in not adjacent to any neighbors, downstairs being a business closed on evenings and the outside world + other apartment rooms on other sides.


The living room and kitchen are one big room only separated by a little corner.




I also intend to throw the occasional party in the living room and enjoy movies and a home theater with considerate volume and don't want to disturb the neighbors at night so I will be covering the music room and living room with acoustic panels to attenuate echos and unwanted reverberation, I'm hoping this will help reduce volume in the apartment.


After reading a lot about soundproofing, I realize this will not be enough so I'm considering soundproofing the living room wall (Wall (A)) that is adjacent to the neighbor's master bedroom. The windows in the living room extend all the way from one wall to the other, so I only have about 3/4 of an inch that I can use to add mass to the wall before getting onto the windows' frames. I also cannot open the wall and place mineral wool or fiberglass in between the wall studs so I'm hoping there's already something there to help with that.


Considering all this, here is what I thought of doing to help with the situation :


1 - Get green glue and add another layer of drywall on top of the existing one

2 - Since I won't have space left to add any other layer of mass because of the window frames, I thought of covering the entire wall surface with 2" Roxul Rockboard 40 mineral wool and just covering the whole thing with a big blanket, would that help at all ? if so how much worth ?


Since I'm mostly concerned with low frequencies, I know rockboard 60 or 80 would be more appropriate, but it is much more expensive, I could go for it if it'd really make the difference but I'm just not sure with the whole concept of a wall of mineral wool, it's the only extra thing I can think of anyway because of the window frames limitation.


3 - maybe a layer of exposed thin mass loaded vinyl in between the roxul and the new drywall ? (it's getting really costly now).


In summary it'd go like this : sound -> layer of rockboard -> new drywall -> green glue -> old drywall -> whatever's inside with the studs -> neighbor's drywall -> neighbor's bedroom.


I would really appreciate any knowledge and opinions on my project, so please let me know all your thoughts.

Thank you so much.

Francis.
 

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Probably a waste of time, money and effort. You cannot effectively soundproof only one part of one wall as low frequency energy will travel through the building structure anyway.
 

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The answer to your question depends partly on the design of the original common wall and what adding a layer of DW with dampening represents. Also the design of the ceilings and floors which as pointed out earlier will be a factor.


So what do you know about the wall? How old is the construction?
 

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Is the floor and ceiling wood framed or concrete slabs? If wood, the bass will simply travel through the floor and ceiling. If concrete, the mass would help a lot and your strategy would fare better.


The insulation materials on the walls will do zero for soundproofing. They will help reduce echo in the room, however.
 

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you probably don't want to hear this but this would all be a waste of time. You are going to spend a bunch of money and time and find that you've only reduced sound maybe 5-10%, which isn't noticeable.
 

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... that's not so if the ceiling and floor is concrete. As in a hi-rise. The concrete creates a nice boundry. Then it's just the wall as the weak link.


If this is wood joist construction and we have subs, then the floor and ceiling will limit the overall results to the point where it's really not worth doing, as you say.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White
... that's not so if the ceiling and floor is concrete. As in a hi-rise. The concrete creates a nice boundry. Then it's just the wall as the weak link.
Not for low frequencies.

Quote:
If this is wood joist construction and we have subs, then the floor and ceiling will limit the overall results to the point where it's really not worth doing, as you say.
Not so simple. The flexing of wood/joist floors will absorb/dissipate some of the LF energy that rigid concrete would transmit.
 

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The mass of the concrete for airborne sound limits this liability. Generally if there's a significant slab, and airborne sound is the issue, it's generally better to leave well enough alone.


For very low frequencies a significant single leaf mass will perform better than the double leaf. So if we have a single mass layer and can leave it, it's often better to do so.


Some interesting (to me anyway) data at the end of this article. http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...e_leaf_effect/ Shows the very low frequency advantage of the single mass layer over double.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3fingerbrown /forum/post/19539280


you probably don't want to hear this but this would all be a waste of time. You are going to spend a bunch of money and time and find that you've only reduced sound maybe 5-10%, which isn't noticeable.

Well actually 5-10% is not so bad, considering that if I put acoustic panels in the apartment everywhere, it will not make it soundproof, but it would considerably lower the "need" to be loud. So adding to this, maybe I can hope for a 30% overall benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/19536975


The answer to your question depends partly on the design of the original common wall and what adding a layer of DW with dampening represents. Also the design of the ceilings and floors which as pointed out earlier will be a factor.


So what do you know about the wall? How old is the construction?

Really don't know anything about the wall, but I intend to remove an electrical socket and find out as much as I can.


The floors seem well soundproofed as I don't ever hear the downstairs kindergarten that's right underneath. As for the 9+ foot high ceiling, I don't know much apart from what looks like a popcorn type ceiling.
 
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