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I am currently wiring my basement for our new home theater, and I would like to know how, anyone has their wires terminated as they come out of the drywall.This would be for HDMI and Speaker. I am planning on mounting my projetor from the ceiling 20 feet back from my screen, with the electronic rack behind that, next to the wall.

I would like to have some sort of jack panel to connect at least my speaker wires to ,maybe even the HDMi cable.

Thanks in advance
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 340duster /forum/post/12982406


I am currently wiring my basement for our new home theater, and I would like to know how, anyone has their wires terminated as they come out of the drywall.

There's a variety of options depending on how much wall space you want to use and how much flexibility you want for future expansion/modification. Speakers are pretty easy; just go to the local big hardware store and they may have several options such as pre-made wall plates:




decora mounts:




and keystone inserts:








HDMI is a bit trickier because of the electrical tolerances and connector size. You can definitely get decora versions:




On the rear side will be another HDMI jack, usually straight-through but since HDMI cables can be stiff and hard to bend in the confines of the wall, some will instead have the rear connector at a 90-degree angle or even include a flexible pigtail.


The downside is that a decora approach takes up an entire box section, meaning bigger or more boxes and wall space. Keystone HDMI inserts exist, but there doesn't seem to be much experience with them yet. Here's a recent thread . I'm going to try some of the trianglecable ones myself and see how it goes.


There are also companies that will make custom wallplates with whatever combination of jacks you want, and some that come preconfigured with the "expected" set of cables such as 5 or 7 speakers plus video.


Worst case, you can just use a plate that has a big hole in it, allowing the cables to be discreetly routed right through the wall surface:




One nice thing about speaker and HDMI cables is that they're in the low-voltage category, so you can use backless boxes and old-work frames instead of trying to cram the connections and bent cable ends into a regular electrical box. Again, you can probably find some selection of these at a big hardware store. For example:




BTW it'll be hard to find something in a store larger than a 2-gang, but you can get them up to 8-gang online:




Personally I'm doing keystone jacks as much as possible. In my equipment room the cables will also end in a big patch panel of keystone slots. It can get pricey because of the added connectors and cable lengths, but I just can't resist the configurability of it.
 

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I just finished my speaker wiring, terminated at the wall surface, and I used binding posts similar to those pictured above. This eliminated guesswork about how much cable to leave hanging out of the wall and also allowed a choice of more attractive wire for the exposed parts and in-wall rated wire (I used Romex type cable) for the in-wall runs.


It was tricky to not melt and deform the binding posts but I soldered the speaker wires to them so there would never be a worry about oxidation or loosening.


I did use regular electrical outlet boxes. Yes it was tricky too, folding the wire ends into the boxes with minimum stress on the binding posts so as not to twist apart the solder joints or crack the cover plates.


I also have some in-wall coax. cables that could be used for either video or a subwoofer.These are not terminated yet but will probably have wall jacks (also pictured above).


All of the cables come together in one place where the equipment is intended to be installed, with electrical boxes and wall mounted binding posts at these ends too. I don't have a jack panel per se.


For the projector I plan to run a conduit in the ceiling and string through whatever cables I need (including an HDMI cable). This way I have a single cable all the way from receiver to projector, that is, without connections (joints) int he lines which is more critical for video as opposed to audio.


Video hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/theater.htm
 

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