AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,519 Posts
Just looked at them. Very interesting indeed. Be interesting to hear if they are more stable at 2 ohms. The 3000 is quoting 2 x 1500 watts 2 ohms. I wonder if that is rms or peak power.


I also wonder if they managed to sort out the noisy fans.


cheers


Graham
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,053 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by gperkins1973
Just looked at them. Very interesting indeed. Be interesting to hear if they are more stable at 2 ohms. The 3000 is quoting 2 x 1500 watts 2 ohms. I wonder if that is rms or peak power.


I also wonder if they managed to sort out the noisy fans.


cheers


Graham
That's exactly what I was thinking. I'm wondering if fan noise will still be an issue on these fans. Also I'm wondering how close they measure to their actual specs.


If these can meet within 80% of their rated specs and do so quieter, I will sell my three EP-4000 amps and purchase a few of these. However I do not see any msrps listed for these amps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,526 Posts
I-pod, I-tech and now I-nuke haha....


The brochures don't list anything useful like AC power drawn, thermal dissipation, etc. At the moment it appears they are vaporware, but I would be interested in seeing what their DSP is like. If it's anything like the Crown XTI in functionality, I would be interested in the I-nuke 6000.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
Oh boy Beri will have a D class 6kw amp prior Peavey and their IPR amps lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,681 Posts
I'm amazed at how Behringer can get the equivalent of 8 HP from a standard electric outlet. 6000 watts is 27 amps at 220v and 100% efficiency, and thus would need a 30 amp breaker. 6000 Watts is 54 amps at 110v, which clearly isn't feasible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,476 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampfox /forum/post/19639930


I'm amazed at how Behringer can get the equivalent of 8 HP from a standard electric outlet. 6000 watts is 27 amps at 220v and 100% efficiency, and thus would need a 30 amp breaker. 6000 Watts is 54 amps at 110v, which clearly isn't feasible.

These are peak watts no one is going to run 6000W continously but still a 30amp circuit is most likely needed for a 6000Watt amp. I have seen 20 amp circuits run 4000Watt amp peaks.


Circuits can run a lot more then what they are rated at for split seconds. I have run 2000Watts through a 15Amp circuit without issue. I tested it direct then put a power strip in and trip the strip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by penngray /forum/post/19639974


These are peak watts no one is going to run 6000W continously but still a 30amp circuit is most likely needed for a 6000Watt amp. I have seen 20 amp circuits run 4000Watt amp peaks.


Circuits can run a lot more then what they are rated at for split seconds. I have run 2000Watts through a 15Amp circuit without issue. I tested it direct then put a power strip in and trip the strip.

Good point. There is some degree of capacitance (storage in the form of electrons separated from one another by insulators within the output stage capacitors ready to discharged in the form of current) to deliver short duration peaks designed into all amps, except true class A which deliver rated power all the time even when no signal is present dissipating the unused power as heat, right? So, in addition to the fact that "Circuits can run a lot more then what they are rated at for split seconds" an amp can "store" power and deliver even more than is available from the wall socket for brief instants...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,681 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by dwomd /forum/post/19640116


Good point. There is some degree of capacitance (storage in the form of electrons separated from one another by insulators within the output stage capacitors ready to discharged in the form of current) to deliver short duration peaks designed into all amps, except true class A which deliver rated power all the time even when no signal is present dissipating the unused power as heat, right? So, in addition to the fact that "Circuits can run a lot more then what they are rated at for split seconds" an amp can "store" power and deliver even more than is available from the wall socket for brief instants...

Indeed, the question is "for how long". Perhaps in some applications the amp can delivery "peak" current long enough not to run into non-linearity. Yet, for a subwoofer that is expected to deliver during long passages of extreme content, I think you may need more than a "split second" of high current.


I'm just pointing out that these numbers are aggressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampfox /forum/post/19640374


Indeed, the question is "for how long". Perhaps in some applications the amp can delivery "peak" current long enough not to run into non-linearity. Yet, for a subwoofer that is expected to deliver during long passages of extreme content, I think you may need more than a "split second" of high current.


I'm just pointing out that these numbers are aggressive.

I have not used a Behringer amp personally, but based on earlier discussions regarding suspicions about the EP 4000 being a re-badged/re-specified EP 2500, I am inclined to agree about the numbers being agressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,366 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by lennon_68 /forum/post/19639531


"We spent years fine-tuning the high-density Class-D technology that gives the iNUKE Series its oomph."


And by "We" they mean someone else!
Very interesting though, any information on pricing?

Just choked on my salad reading this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,681 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by dwomd /forum/post/19640486


I have not used a Behringer amp personally, but based on earlier discussions regarding suspicions about the EP 4000 being a re-badged/re-specified EP 2500, I am inclined to agree about the numbers being agressive.

I'm currently using 2 EP2500s. They are each on dedicated 15 amp breakers. I've driven them just to the edge of clipping and they don't trip the breaker. Remember, the amp is 'rated' for 2500 watts, which would be 20+ amps. I'm not sure what it will deliver continuously, but it's certainly well below 2500 watts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,476 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampfox /forum/post/19640809


I'm currently using 2 EP2500s. They are each on dedicated 15 amp breakers. I've driven them just to the edge of clipping and they don't trip the breaker. Remember, the amp is 'rated' for 2500 watts, which would be 20+ amps. I'm not sure what it will deliver continuously, but it's certainly well below 2500 watts.

EP2500s have been measured to deliver 2000Watts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,946 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampfox /forum/post/19640374


Indeed, the question is "for how long". Perhaps in some applications the amp can delivery "peak" current long enough not to run into non-linearity. Yet, for a subwoofer that is expected to deliver during long passages of extreme content, I think you may need more than a "split second" of high current.


I'm just pointing out that these numbers are aggressive.

Look at circuit breaker trip curves. They will (typically) hold three or four times their rated current for 5 to 10 seconds. Granted, that doesn't necessarily address any voltage drop issues on a (potentially) long circuit, but it still facilitates amp dynamic/peak output well beyond what initially seems possible for the circuit.


There is no breaking the electrical "rules", afaik, but usually it goes beyond simple I = P/E analysis of the amp's output because most of us don't listen to continuous test tones through our audio systems. A test bench test is a different matter entirely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,681 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99 /forum/post/19640908


Look at circuit breaker trip curves. They will (typically) hold three or four times their rated current for 5 to 10 seconds. Granted, that doesn't necessarily address any voltage drop issues on a (potentially) long circuit, but it still facilitates amp dynamic/peak output well beyond what initially seems possible for the circuit.


There is no breaking the electrical "rules", afaik, but usually it goes beyond simple I = P/E analysis of the amp's output because most of us don't listen to continuous test tones through our audio systems. A test bench test is a different matter entirely.

I was testing my subs with test tones, driving them has hard as I could, without clipping the amp.

My bias is that an amp should be rated for it's capability to deliver power continuously not some arbitrary short period of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,946 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampfox /forum/post/19641014


I was testing my subs with test tones, driving them has hard as I could, without clipping the amp.

My bias is that an amp should be rated for it's capability to deliver power continuously not some arbitrary short period of time.

I'm not going to get into that pissing match except to say that the music and movies I watch don't work on "continuous" output power. They work on high demand peaks with relatively low average power.


Pushing an amp to clipping (or not) and the amp being able to maintain full, continuous output for an indefinite time are two way different things.


If you demand continuous output at rated power then one better up their amp budget quite significantly unless you happen to find a stash of a select few old school amps at bargain basement prices, and put in the massive power distibution system to feed them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,476 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampfox /forum/post/19641014


I was testing my subs with test tones, driving them has hard as I could, without clipping the amp.

My bias is that an amp should be rated for it's capability to deliver power continuously not some arbitrary short period of time.


That isnt what the industry standard is though.


The real world is simply about peaks for split seconds the rest of the time we are using less then 1 Watt on average.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,681 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by penngray /forum/post/19641086


That isnt what the industry standard is though.


The real world is simply about peaks for split seconds the rest of the time we are using less then 1 Watt on average.


There really isn't a standard.

I totally agree that the vast majority of time we are using less than a watt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,681 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99 /forum/post/19641050


I'm not going to get into that pissing match except to say that the music and movies I watch don't work on "continuous" output power. They work on high demand peaks with relatively low average power.


Pushing an amp to clipping (or not) and the amp being able to maintain full, continuous output for an indefinite time are two way different things.


If you demand continuous output at rated power then one better up their amp budget quite significantly unless you happen to find a stash of a select few old school amps at bargain basement prices, and put in the massive power distibution system to feed them.

My point is that I would take a 6000 watt rating with a grain of salt.

There is no point in getting emotional over all this.
 
1 - 20 of 77 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top