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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm here to seek guidance from people much wiser than me in HT design.





The architect is finishing up the plans on our house right now and has presented this room as the layout for the HT. As you can see there is an angled alcove where the door comes into the room. My question is, will this cause a lot of issues with sound bouncing around and would it be better to square that off and make the room a true rectangle? Or am I making much ado about nothing?


My second question is, since this will be on the second floor is there much I can do to the floor to increase sound isolation? Luckily this will be over the garage so it won't be a huge concern but I would like to build as smart as possible. I had planned on doing double drywall with green glue on the ceiling and walls but is that going to be a waste if nothing is done to the floor?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfi /forum/post/18189786


Hello, I’m here to seek guidance from people much wiser than me in HT design.





The architect is finishing up the plans on our house right now and has presented this room as the layout for the HT. As you can see there is an angled alcove where the door comes into the room. My question is, will this cause a lot of issues with sound bouncing around and would it be better to square that off and make the room a true rectangle? Or am I making much ado about nothing?


My second question is, since this will be on the second floor is there much I can do to the floor to increase sound isolation? Luckily this will be over the garage so it won’t be a huge concern but I would like to build as smart as possible. I had planned on doing double drywall with green glue on the ceiling and walls but is that going to be a waste if nothing is done to the floor?

Good that you're asking these questions now. A few quick points:


Depending on how much sound isolation you're looking for, you'd do well to consider a double door scenario, Not side-by-side doors, but rather two doors that when closed create an airlock.


That stairwell is a problem. Stairwells are uniquely connected to all major framing and support structures. You'll have to plan around that. Not a big deal, but a deal, nonetheless.


If new construction, you can decouple that subfloor before proceeding with the room.


You should consider decoupled framing for the walls and ceiling.


Consider ventilation. Can be a big sound leak.


All of these are reasonably straightforward right now. Once the room is built... much more difficult.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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Originally Posted by Ted White /forum/post/18190154


Good that you're asking these questions now. A few quick points:


Depending on how much sound isolation you're looking for, you'd do well to consider a double door scenario, Not side-by-side doors, but rather two doors that when closed create an airlock.


That stairwell is a problem. Stairwells are uniquely connected to all major framing and support structures. You'll have to plan around that. Not a big deal, but a deal, nonetheless.


If new construction, you can decouple that subfloor before proceeding with the room.


You should consider decoupled framing for the walls and ceiling.


Consider ventilation. Can be a big sound leak.


All of these are reasonably straightforward right now. Once the room is built... much more difficult.

I was hoping you would respond Mr. White.



I think double doors might be more than I'm willing to bite off.


I hadn't even considered the stairwell being an issue. I guess that's why I came here!


By decoupling the floor, did you mean using something like this http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...ist_isolators/ so I would have a floating floor on top of my subflooring? Other options?


I had thought I would do 6" staggered stud walls to decouple the walls, would I do the same thing on the ceiling to decouple there? Or would I be better off just using Whisperclips?


For the HVAC, I think I read on here that two 90® turns in the ductwork going to that room would help a great deal. Anything else I should consider?


I guess I should say, I don't expect this room to be completely sound isolated. I just want a reasonable amount of noise reduction.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfi /forum/post/18198032



I think double doors might be more than I'm willing to bite off. They will likely define the degree of overall isolation.


By decoupling the floor, did you mean using something like this http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...ist_isolators/ so I would have a floating floor on top of my subflooring? Other options?

If that 2x4 in the picture was your joist, just turn that picture upside down. Rubber isolators on the top. Then subfloor. This is generally accomodated by local building inspectors but should be cleared with them first.


I had thought I would do 6" staggered stud walls to decouple the walls, would I do the same thing on the ceiling to decouple there? Or would I be better off just using Whisperclips?

Clips are generally more convenient.


For the HVAC, I think I read on here that two 90® turns in the ductwork going to that room would help a great deal. Anything else I should consider?

Yes. Two 90 degree turns will do nothing. If you PM me your email, I can send a couple of articles.
Good questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White /forum/post/18198396


If that 2x4 in the picture was your joist, just turn that picture upside down. Rubber isolators on the top. Then subfloor. This is generally accomodated by local building inspectors but should be cleared with them first.


Yes. Two 90 degree turns will do nothing. If you PM me your email, I can send a couple of articles.

Good questions.

RE: the subfloor. Good! I'm glad about that, I was worried about the loss of that 4" doing a floating floor. The subfloor is still screwed into the joists, right?


PM sent, thanks!
 

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Actually, You would have two layers of subfloor, damping material in between. Screw the two sheets of subfloor together, but screws do not enter the joists. The floor floats on the rubber.
 

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Since the theater is in the upstairs and you are planning to do some 90degree turns and most likely this room is the furthest from your furnace you want to be sure to speak directly to the HVAC guy to make sure they get enough air into that room and out of the room. Most HVAC people do not understand theaters let alone making sure each room gets enough air movement. Make sure this is done or you will kick yourself many times over for not ensuring this is done properly. If the HVAC person seems confused find someone else.


You would be surprised how hot some theaters can get in 2 hours with 5-7 people in them.
 

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You should rough up a seating plan. That door to the closet looks problematic. You can get dimensions for various HT seating configurations on the Berkline website. If you are planning on two rows you also need to give some thought to how you will place a riser in this room. You may want to put the screen on the wall less obvious if you are placing a riser in the room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by adammb /forum/post/18202869


Since the theater is in the upstairs and you are planning to do some 90degree turns and most likely this room is the furthest from your furnace you want to be sure to speak directly to the HVAC guy to make sure they get enough air into that room and out of the room. Most HVAC people do not understand theaters let alone making sure each room gets enough air movement. Make sure this is done or you will kick yourself many times over for not ensuring this is done properly. If the HVAC person seems confused find someone else.


You would be surprised how hot some theaters can get in 2 hours with 5-7 people in them.

After looking at the information Mr White sent me I will not be doing the 90 degree turns, rather I will be using insulated flexible duct work instead. I will definitely bring this up to the HVAC guy though. Room temp is definitely a concern of mine though, I sweat sitting outside in a snowstorm so I don't want to do anything to make that worse.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/18203395


You should rough up a seating plan. That door to the closet looks problematic. You can get dimensions for various HT seating configurations on the Berkline website. If you are planning on two rows you also need to give some thought to how you will place a riser in this room. You may want to put the screen on the wall less obvious if you are placing a riser in the room.

Yeah, I had noticed that door as well. I'm afraid it might be an issue also. I'll be drawing something up, probably this weekend and hopefully getting y'alls opinion on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/18205617


You could do a split door, hinged on each side, or a bi-fold door.

Good idea!


Last night I had a great conversation with my wife. I wanted her to be prepared for how much this is going to cost, so I asked her what she thought it would be. Her response: "Well, I definitely don't want to half ass it".
 
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