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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am completely new to home audio and my wife and I just purchased a home that came with 5.1 prewire in the media room as well as two speakers in the kitchen and bedroom. All the speaker wire locations are in the ceiling, with the exception of the sub, and I am looking into installing some in-ceiling speakers.


At the risk of sounding silly I have a question about the wire that I found. I expected to see some red and black wires when I opened up the cover but instead found a 4 cond wire. I had to look online to find out what this was, however, the wire doesn't seem to terminate. Does that mean I have to cut this wire in order to install the speaker? Would I then have to run the speaker in series and would the surround sound be kept intact? Looking for some advice as I don't want to mess any of the wiring up.


I have a picture of the wire that I found. Thanks for any help you can provide.


Derrick
 

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damn, but I hate "crap" audio installers who don't have a clue what they are doing.


my "guess", without tracing the wire circuits is that one 4 conductor cable feeds two speaker locations. One pair of conductors to one speaker, the second pair to the other speaker. HOPEFULLY, the speaker pairs feed by the cable are the front L&R on one cable, and the surround L&R on a different cable. What did they wire for the center channel, and is the subwoofer prewired as well ?
 

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Don't they have some kind of testers that you can put onto a wire to see if it's "live"?


I know these wouldn't be live... my understanding is you would connect a sender unit at one end and then run something over the wires here and if the signal being generated is passing through it buzzes or something?


Those might be on their way to another location. Sure would be a shame to cut them in error.


I'm glad I'm doing my own.... it's been a very interesting process (pardon the poor pictures)


I biamp and this is the closet on the back side of the room. Not knowing how I'll have it exactly setup, I ran 2 sets of wire to biamp using XLR connections, 2 sets of wires to biamp using RCA connections, 4 dedicated 20 amp lines (with each outlet having switched/non-switched parts) and on.....


My wife rolled her eyes so I asked her... would you prefer I wait until I am done with the room and run the wires down the floor?


NO!!!


Ok, then....since I don't know yet exactly what my needs are, (or if they'll change/grow), I'm trying to future proof myself now before any drywall is up!


I think she rolled her eyes again... lol

 

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Looking closer at your picture (or trying to)... is it possible that this is electrical wire? Could it be 14/3 with ground or something like that?


Hard to tell from the picture. The color of the sheath makes me wonder without seeing any writing on it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by coytee /forum/post/19581211


Looking closer at your picture (or trying to)... is it possible that this is electrical wire? Could it be 14/3 with ground or something like that?


Hard to tell from the picture. The color of the sheath makes me wonder without seeing any writing on it.

It seems to be four conductors 16AWG cable. Something like this http://www.cablesforless.com/p-1346-...aker-wire.aspx
 

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Welcome to the Forum, dmccray!


I assume there's some place the cable comes out of the wall, where the equipment is supposed to be located. I also assume at the equipment location you have at least two of those cables coming out of the wall?


Here's the way the four-conductor cable works. To keep things simple for this description we'll concentrate on the right speakers only. There will be a single cable run from the equipment location to front speaker, and on back to the rear speaker. Each cable has four individual wires inside colored (for example) red, black, white and green.


At the equipment location, you would connect (for example) the red/black pair to your receiver's front speaker connections, and the green/white pair to the rear speaker connections.


At the front speaker location, you would cut the cable. Now you have two cable ends in your hand, one going back to the equipment, and one going over to the rear speaker location. You would connect the front speaker to the black and red pair of the cable running back to the equipment. Then you would splice the green and white wires of both cable ends back together. At the rear speaker location, you would connect that speaker to the green/white wires. (The red/black pair would not be used - they're just along for the ride between the front and rear speakers.)


That said, ceiling speakers are a very bad idea for any of the front speakers. You should use free-standing speakers instead. You want the speakers firing towards the seating area, not down at the floor in front of the TV. In-ceiling would be fine for the rear speakers, though, as long as they're fairly close and behind the seating.


Regards,

Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the reply, that makes a lot more sense now with splicing the wires back together. I've heard many people mention that ceiling speakers are not a good idea for the front speakers and luckily I only bought a pair so far so I think I will change my mind about the speakers upfront and buy free standing speakers for those.


Thanks for the advice.
 

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It's always good to keep the fronts near the screen, since that's where the onscreen sound effects are played (especially through the center.) If they're in the ceiling, the screen would have to be up near there somewhere.
 
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