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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Why do they seemingly NOT continue LCOS RPTVs in 2002? Were there major problems???


Last year's RCA LCOS seems to NOT have DVI.....


- - -


On the other hand, the new CRT-based Scenium RPTVs sound great (lots of bells and whistles):

http://www.thomson.net/gb/06/r02/021121.htm


-- i.e., both DVI-HDCP and IEEE (Firewire), DirecTV HD tuner/receiver, ATSC HD tuner, etc., some with built-in DVD player, etc., for a ridiculously low price compared to other brand RPTVs --


but from reading the article, they are CRT RPTVs, not digital displays (i.e., LCOS, DLP or LCD).


Wide panorama RCA Scenium High-Definition television products from Thomson provide stunning Home Theatre performance for HDTV broadcasts, DVD movies


New Integrated HDTV Sets Also Offer Second Window to the Internet With Broadband Connection*



INDIANAPOLIS, November 21, 2002 - Whether it's the excitement of lifelike HDTV programming, the convenience of built-in DVD movie viewing, or the novel experience of fast, giant-screen web surfing, the new series of RCA Scenium integrated HDTVs and HDTV Sets and widescreen HDTV Monitors from Thomson (Euronext Paris: 18453) (NYSE: TMS) deliver on the full promise of digital home entertainment.


Now available at retail in retail stores throughout the U.S., the new RCA Scenium product range includes:



Three multi-format rear projection, widescreen HDTV Sets with the exclusive SceniVisionâ„¢ HD Picture System and secure digital interfaces for the seamless flow of high-resolution content.


Three 16x9 widescreen rear-projection HDTV Monitors, the first in the industry to include built-in DVD players.



One 16x9 widescreen, flat-tube direct-view HDTV monitor with built-in DVD player and Clip'Onâ„¢ frames (sold separately), giving consumer decorator choices in television cabinet designs.


"These new RCA Scenium integrated HDTV Sets and HDTV Monitors give consumers the optimum choice for home entertainment. Featuring big-screen picture performance in the same widescreen format in which movies are filmed and unmatched audio performance, we can recreate the look and feel of a movie theatre," said Eric Meurice, Executive Vice President, TV Product Management Worldwide. "Our fully integrated HDTV Sets also include broadband connectivity*for living room viewers to easily check statistics and even e-mail with a built-in browser for a second window to the Internet."



RCA Scenium Global Design


The new line of RCA Scenium products has been designed to appeal to consumers throughout the world. Thomson's design centers in the U.S. and Paris developed the Scenium aesthetic.


RCA Scenium rear projection HDTV products feature a high-gloss black screen area that separates the different elements of the TV design. The borderless screen creates the illusion of a "floating picture" that mysteriously emerges from the darkness - much like the movie screen in a darkened theatre. In addition, the television's brushed metal control panel and refined cloth-covered speaker enclosures visually represent the three core elements of the home theatre experience - picture, technology and sound - with an added sense of elegance and sophistication that fits in any home theatre environment.


Integrated Widescreen High-Definition Television


Combining elegance in design and excellence in technology, the three new RCA Scenium integrated HDTV models are the 65-inch (diagonal) HD65W140 (suggested retail price $4,299), the 61-inch HD61W140 (suggested retail price $3,799) and the 52-inch HD52W140 (suggested retail price $3,199), all of which feature built-in Microsoft Windows CE operating system with integrated web browser that provides a second window to the Internet*for convenient web surfing. The new models also incorporate secure digital interfaces (DVI-HDTV with HDCP and IEEE1394 DTVLink) that assure optimum picture performance from compressed digital signals. Thomson has developed the exclusive SceniVisionâ„¢ HD Picture System that includes next-generation ATSC receiver/decoder circuitry, InfiniFocusâ„¢ high-definition CRTs, Linear Motion Upconverter progressive scan technology and Adaptive Reverse 3:2 Pulldown for sharp HDTV images.


To achieve the theatre-like sound necessary for a true home theatre performance experience, RCA Scenium HDTVs are equipped with premium audio enhancements including a powerful 60-watt audio system with built-in 30-watt subwoofer for producing dramatic bass effects.


First Rear-Projection HDTV Monitors With Built-in DVD Players


The three RCA Scenium rear projection HDTV Monitor models (in 61-inch, 52-inch and 40-inch screen sizes) and one direct-view 34-inch model feature integrated DVD players - an industry first for rear-projection HDTV sets. In addition to


playing video DVDs, each of the DVD monitors is also compatible with audio CDs, CD-R and mp3 encoded CDs.


The three HDTV rear projection monitors are the 61-inch D61W135D (suggested retail price $3,099), the 52-inch D52W135D (suggested retail price $2,499) and the 40-inch D40W135D (suggested retail price $2,299). The direct-view monitor is the 34-inch D34W135D (suggested retail price $2,599).



To further personalize the flat-screen, direct-view 34-inch model, Thomson designers created the exclusive Clip'On frame system that allows consumers to choose from multiple colors of decorative frames to complement various types of room décor. The frames easily snap onto the face of the TV.


HDTV Monitors in the RCA Scenium line feature progressive scan upconversion, 1080i and 480p display capability, interactive format control and automatic letterbox detection to fill out the 16x9 widescreen viewing area. The 2002 RCA Scenium line also includes the D61W130 (suggested retail price $2,899) 61-inch projection HDTV Monitor and the PHD50400 (suggested retail price $12,999) 50-inch plasma HDTV Monitor with optional base and speakers.


Plugging Together


All of Thomson's new RCA Scenium HDTV sets and HDTV Monitors include industry-standard secure digital DVI-HDTV interfaces with HDCP copy protection for display of uncompressed, pristine high-definition video signals. Additionally, RCA Scenium HDTV sets with the SceniVision HD Picture System also include dual industry-standard DTVLink (IEEE1394) inputs with DTCP copy protection for external components. All RCA Scenium HDTV Monitors and sets also include SYNCROSCANâ„¢ HD component video inputs that allow connection of up to two component video sources (such as currently available HDTV set-top receivers and DVD players).


*Internet service sold separately.


Certain statements in this press release, including any discussion of management expectations for future periods, constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the "safe harbor" of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements are based on management's current expectations and beliefs and are subject to a number of factors and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from the future results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements due to changes in global economic and business conditions, consumer electronics markets and regulatory factors. More detailed information on the potential factors that could affect the financial results of Thomson multimedia is contained in Thomson multimedia's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.



About Thomson

With sales of 10.5 billion Euros (U.S. $ 9.3 billion) in 2001 and 73,000 employees in more than 30 countries, Thomson (Euronext Paris: 18453; NYSE: TMS) provides a wide range of video (and enabling) technologies, systems, finished products and services to consumers and professionals in the entertainment and media industries. To advance and enable the digital media transition, Thomson has five principal divisions: Digital Media Solutions, Displays and Components, Consumer Products, Patents and Licensing, and New Media Services. The company distributes its products under the Technicolor, Grass Valley, THOMSON and RCA brand names.


Thomson's Consumer Products division is represented by a broad range of home entertainment products, marketed primarily under the RCA brand in the Americas and under the THOMSON brand in Europe. Thomson is a leader in high-definition digital television, mp3 digital audio, and DVD disc products. The company's most advanced consumer products are sold under the RCA Scenium banner, emphasizing superior technology and elegant design.

For more information: www.rca.com.



Consumer Products Press Relations

Dave Arland

Telephone : (317)587-4450

E-Mail : [email protected]


James Harper

Telephone : (317)587-4347

E-Mail: [email protected]
 

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MAYBE THIS EXPLAINS IT .......


(good luck getting repairs/parts for this TV ... on the other hand, for $3600 it might be the bargain of the year)


- - -

http://www.insightmedia.info/news/ThomsonSTORY.htm


Press Release


(no date on the press release)


Thomson/RCA Retires LCOS TV Set


Thomson Multimedia (Indianapolis, IN), which markets products in North America under the RCA brand ( www.rca.com ), reports that it is discontinuing the recently introduced Scenium L50000. This set, which retailed for $8,000, used a trio of 1280 x 1024 LCOS panels from Three-Five Systems (Tempe, AZ) ( www.three-five.com ) and an engine built by Corning Precision Lens (Cincinnati, OH) ( www.cpl.com ).


Thomson noted that the L50000 LCOS HDTV was produced in very limited quantities and has been selling through regional retailers since earlier this year. "This model will be retired, along with several other HDTV products, as new 2002 RCA Scenium HDTV Monitors and sets reach the market," said a company spokesperson.


The set was about six months late in reaching the market last February and the price was raised a $1,000 over the initial price tag. The set's performance was good, but the price tag was way too high. A quick check of the RCA web site revealed that the LCOS set is not featured any more.


At Infocomm, Insight Media learned that about 1,000 of the sets had been produced but only around 200 have been sold so far. This was clearly not a product that was working for a major volume retailer like Thomson, so it is not surprising it pulled the plug.


The TVs were being assembled in the company's Juarez, Mexico plant after a multi-million dollar tooling investment. Time to add Thomson to the list of companies burned by failed LCOS efforts. -- CC



Thomson, Dave Arland, 317-587-4450, [email protected]


Insight Media, Annmarie Gabisch, 203-831-8464, [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK, I get it. It's a discontinued model. If it produces a good quality image is could still be worth the price.


Again, has anybody seen this set in person!?
 

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And some more:

http://www.insightmedia.info/news/LC...p%20Needed.htm


From this article:

Price & Performance: If LCOS-based projection products are to compete in the market, they must offer performance matched to price. Thomson's L50000 LCOS TV at $8K does not offer the level of performance most would expect in a TV priced at this level. Clearly, high contrast, good color saturation, minimal artifacts, low black levels and good uniformity are key elements for quality microdisplay-based TV sets. Panasonic offers HTPS sets and Samsung offers DLP sets in the $3,500 to $4,500 price range that fit the bill. These are at the high end of the range of consumer pricing, but are expected to come down quite rapidly over the next few years. These sets use mature engine architectures and have an established supply chain. The price-down paths are there.


Looks like black levels and color saturation are the digital-projection bugaboos with LCOS, too.


- - -


LCOS Leadership Needed


10.04.2002

Chris Chinnock


Having just returned from SID's Microdisplay 2002 Conference, what is clear is that the third microdisplay technology, liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS), continues to struggle to gain full commercial status. Yes, a trickle of products are in the market and more are coming, but so far, no top-tier company is fully behind the technology and willing to make a big bet on it. Unfortunately, bold leadership is exactly what is needed if LCOS is to become more than a niche technology.


An evening panel discussion, which talked about the "Lessons Learned in the Commercialization of Microdisplays," was a watershed of information about what works and what doesn't in the process of bringing a new display technology into mass production. The panelists were chosen to reflect a diversity of perspectives, and each has broad experience and battle scars to show for their efforts. The panel consisted of:


Lewis Collier, CEO, DisplayCheck ( www.DisplayCheck.com )

Fred Hammett, President, International Marketing and Distribution (IMAD)

Michael Newell, Director of Product Development, Advanced Digital Optics ( www.advopt.com )

Mike Scarpa, Manufacturing Development Manager, Corning Precision Lens ( www.corning.com )

Larry Hornbeck, TI Fellow, Texas Instruments ( www.dlp.com )

Jong Tae Lim, Senior Researcher, Samsung Electronics ( www.samsung.co.kr )


The panel members have participated in the commercialization of new microdisplay technology at the device, engine and final product level, as well as from an Asian customer/supplier and package and test perspective. Each offered different viewpoints in their presentations and then engaged in a lively interaction with audience members, such that all understood the issues much more clearly. By the end of the evening, some themes were apparent.


Leadership: The leadership that Texas Instruments has shown in its commercialization of DLP microdisplay technology was well respected by the panel and audience members. Earlier in the conference, Larry Hornbeck, generally acknowledged as the inventor of the DLP technology back in 1987, gave an overview of the development process that led TI to commercial shipments of DLP systems in 1996. He noted that in 1992, TI made the decision to invest the resources to fully commercialize the DLP technology. While TI does not divulge the cost of its research and development efforts, industry observers think a $1B is not unreasonable.


"I can guarantee you," said Hornbeck, "that if we were making that business decision in today's market and financial environments, we would not commercialize the DLP technology." Whether this decision would be based on today's economic conditions or the hindsight of the true cost of commercialization was not clear, however.


TI's strategy included development of DLP devices, supporting ASICs, engines and reference projection systems. It provided these reference designs to customers early on, initially supplying the projection engine and slowly moving toward providing a chip & board set, and now a component chip set.


Over the last year, it has made a huge effort to bring down the bill of materials (BOM) cost for a rear-projection TV in order to offer a competitively priced set. To do this, it has worked with many of the component suppliers throughout the projection supply chain to set price targets and help solve other infrastructure issues to reach its objectives. Simultaneously, it has worked with a number of TV set makers to ensure that products will reach market with the performance and pricing that will create sales. This effort has culminated with Samsung's first DLP-based RPTV products now on the market - with more coming soon from other suppliers.


The leadership of Sony and Epson in the commercialization of high temperature polysilicon (HTPS) microdisplay technology has been a bit different. As vertically integrated companies, both were able to develop panels, engines and final projection products and bring them to market under their own brand names. They worked with Japan-based suppliers to establish the component supply and manufacturing infrastructure.


With LCOS, no dominant leader has yet emerged. At last count, there are perhaps 20 companies in various stages of commercialization of LCOS panels, yet none tower head and shoulders above the others. All are investing in LCOS, but none at the multi-hundred-million dollar level that will probably be needed.


So who could lead and why aren't they? The obvious leader that most panelists pointed to was JVC. But JVC does not appear to be aiming development of its commercialization efforts at the mass consumer TV market. Instead, it is focused on the high end of the market where projection systems cost more, but fewer are sold. JVC's approach appears aimed at commercializing LCOS technology in a segment where it does not have to compete toe-to-toe with DLP and HTPS. Once established, then it can contemplate a move toward more mainstream applications. While this may work for JVC, it will not garner large market share for LCOS systems - something that many feel is necessary to sustain a manufacturing infrastructure.


Hitachi is often mentioned too. It is a component and semiconductor company that manufactures front projectors and has a strong RPTV presence. It could become the LCOS leader but, so far, has shown no signs of this.


The same goes with Philips. It has component and semiconductor technology, builds engines and projectors, and has a full big-screen TV lineup through its consumer electronics division. It is investing in LCOS, but like Hitachi, seems to be pacing its investments. Both are big enough to solve problems and become market leaders, but we don't see high-level leadership and the dollars to match, from either company, yet.


Three-Five must be considered. While it has the desire to be a leader, and is certainly leading in the test and measurement arena, most agree it just does not have the financial resources needed to spend its way into a market dominant position - ala the TI model.


UMC, which provides backplane foundry services for many and is in partnership with Aurora to produce LCOS panels, could be a leader too. But its involvement with the LCOS Taiwan Consortium, which was supposed to spur commercialization, has not borne fruit.


There are other players in the wings that we can't talk about yet that have the potential to be dominant LCOS market leaders, but none are ready to make a move.


Can a final product company champion LCOS and help drive commercialization? Samsung could, but it appears to be more focused on DLP commercialization right now. InFocus could, but with a strong line of DLP and HTPS-based products, it probably doesn't see a compelling reason to take a big risk on LCOS. Thomson/RCA could, and started down this path, but has pulled way back now. We suspect it just did not see a path to a low enough bill of materials with LCOS.


Can the horde of Chinese TV makers become a group of champions for LCOS? Maybe, but they lack technical horsepower to drive the infrastructure development at this time, so probably not.


Many observed that pockets of expertise exist within companies. One has the best panel; another the best optics; a third the best electronics, TV, marketing or engineering team. But no single company possesses all of these under one organization. No critical mass exists to drive a company toward leadership.


So the question remains open - who will lead LCOS into the mass consumer markets it will need to play in if it is to rise above niche status?


Price & Performance: If LCOS-based projection products are to compete in the market, they must offer performance matched to price. Thomson's L50000 LCOS TV at $8K does not offer the level of performance most would expect in a TV priced at this level. Clearly, high contrast, good color saturation, minimal artifacts, low black levels and good uniformity are key elements for quality microdisplay-based TV sets. Panasonic offers HTPS sets and Samsung offers DLP sets in the $3,500 to $4,500 price range that fit the bill. These are at the high end of the range of consumer pricing, but are expected to come down quite rapidly over the next few years. These sets use mature engine architectures and have an established supply chain. The price-down paths are there.


The prospects for LCOS are less clear. First, while the three-panel ColorQuad engine design is probably the standard architecture at this time, it is expensive, so getting the BOM for the engine reduced is a key need for those in the LCOS camp. There continues to be tremendous innovation in this area, although some, like Chuck McLaughlin, call it anarchy. The result could very well be high-performance reduced-cost engine designs for LCOS systems. In addition, architectures that feature two- and one-panel designs will help lower BOMs even further, as will the move to smaller-sized panels. But smaller panels require a trade off in terms of light throughput. "You can't cheat the etendue God," quipped IMAD's Fred Hammett. Performance is another issue. It can be very high, but only if expensive components are used. Market-needed performance with market-needed BOMs remains a challenge for LCOS.


In real estate, the watchword is location, location, location. But for microdisplay-based systems, the mantra is price, price, price, says ADO's Michael Newell. "We must work in an environment where next year's engine price will be 50% to 70% lower than today's prices. And, customers want free development, Cadillac performance and Yugo pricing. That's tough." The other panel members concurred with this.


Believers think the solution is within grasp, but the train is leaving the station. Unless LCOS is on it, it may not get a chance to compete well against HPTS and DLP in mainstream projection markets.


In the just-released "Microdisplay Forecast & Company Profile Report" from Insight Media and McLaughlin Consulting Group, microdisplay-based technology is forecast to rapidly replace CRTs in rear-projection TV sets, rising to a 70% penetration level by 2006. But the lions' share of those sets will be HTPS and DLP based.


Partnerships: Choosing the best suppliers and partners seems obvious, but can sometimes be tricky. Larger companies may not be willing to make a big bet on a small component supplier with a critical part - even if it is outstanding technology. No one likes to sole source anything, yet TI was able to convince dozens of customers to do just that.


Partnerships can come unraveled for a number of reasons. If problems or delays ensue, finger pointing can begin.

Most would agree that the entire LCOS industry has not matured as fast as hoped. Mass production has been just around the corner for three years, but has not yet arrived for the projection segment.


Where it has seen success is in viewfinders where Displaytech and Kopin are clearly in a mass production mode. Kopin forged Taiwanese partnerships early, but also has critical manufacturing operations in the U.S. Displaytech made a smart partnership with Miyota, a major supplier of CRT-based viewfinders, which jumped on an opportunity to have the next-generation technology in-house.


Many view the RPTV market and the interest of Taiwanese component and Chinese TV makers as the keys to success for LCOS. But the Chinese TV makers are hedging their bets by working with HTPS, DLP and many LCOS suppliers. "These Chinese TV makers don't have the in-house expertise to fully develop and commercialize these technologies," says IMAD's Fred Hammett. "If LCOS wants to win here, a total system solution must be presented to these companies."


There will always be problems and triumphs in the supply chain and customer relations, but winning combinations have not yet emerged in LCOS projection products. Vertically integrated companies can have an advantage, but this is no guarantee for success either.


Manufacturing Infrastructure: The manufacturing infrastructure to support mass production of the microdisplay and the entire projection or near-to-eye system has to be in place to realize success. For LCOS, most of the infrastructure is headed for Taiwan and China, but implementing this has proved more difficult and time consuming than anticipated.


"As you are building up the infrastructure while in low-volume production, components cost more and there are limited suppliers," notes DisplayCheck's Lewis Collier. "In addition, many have adopted the fabless manufacturing model of the semiconductor industry, but I am not sure this will work well for LCOS manufacture. Partnership fabrication or outsourced design engineering with in-house fabrication seem to be the prevailing choices."


Standards: With 20 companies developing LCOS solutions, there are no standards. Each display size and package are different. There is no standard engine architecture or interfaces between components. This lack of standardization can be costly since additional development efforts are needed as plans change.


Consortiums and standards committees can help solve this, but only if individual company interests are managed to help the overall industry. As mentioned earlier, the LCOS Strategic Partnership in Taiwan is supposed to be doing that, but does not appear to be making much progress.

Individual companies can create the industry standard by fielding components and systems that dominate the market. But that brings us back to the leadership question for LCOS. With leadership or a product home run will come standards.


System Level Testing: "You can't test the full microdisplay-based system soon enough," lamented CPL's Mike Scarpa, referring to its efforts to build the engine for the RCA LCOS TV. Problems that were not evident at one level were very evident at other levels. Therefore, it is critical to test components including lifecycle and environmental testing early on. "System performance does not equate to the sum of component performances," observes Scarpa.

ADO's Newell observed that "On-screen image performance is the result of the optics, mechanics, electronics and screen technologies. Deficiencies in any of these areas can lead to non-optimal image performance. What is needed are bright and clear images."


Many LCOS development teams are learning this lesson the hard way. It is not enough to design a panel, or even an engine reference design for that matter. A team effort from component and subsystem suppliers working in tandem with the final product maker/brander is absolutely essential to commercialize a new microdisplay technology. TI did it with DLP and Intel did it with microprocessors. It can be done with LCOS, but it will take commitment and lots of funding. Who will take the risk?


Managing Change: In the process of commercializing a new microdisplay technology, and associated products, technology often changes rapidly. This is certainly the case with all microdisplay technologies today. This can have a serious impact on the development and commercialization process.

For example, several years ago, LCOS developers focused on 0.9- and 0.97-inch panel sizes aimed at mainstream presentation markets. But as these panels were slow to enter the market, mainstream panel sizes began to shift toward 0.7-inch sizes. Just as the larger LCOS panels were being perfected and readied for commercialization, they were viewed as trailing edge and not worthy of a price premium. Therefore, many early generations of LCOS panels never reached a revenue-producing stage to provide funds for next-generation development. This meant alternative sources of funding were required, increasing the risk of development.


The same thing has happened at the engine level. Architectures and components designed for a particular panel are quickly obsolete, as new technology is developed to improve performance or lower costs. Or, limitations in performance may be realized late in the development cycle.

Change is inevitable, so managing it is critical. All of these factors delay product introductions and can require costly retooling and write-offs of inventory. As Mike Scarpa advises, "Developers need to monitor market and technology changes and institute formal change management early. Pace investment with market acceptance of the imager performance."


Managing Expectations: With change comes new levels of expectations. The performance bar may keep rising during the commercialization cycle, often because market conditions demand it. "A couple of years ago, contrast of 300:1 for LCOS systems looked fine, but it is not today," notes ADO's Michael Newell.


The consequence can be delays, redesigns and much higher costs. In addition, responsibility for component and subsystem quality and performance can become more complex, and hidden costs may emerge. Communication is key, but no panacea for success.


So what does all this mean? Probably that the bigger LCOS players will continue to go it alone, picking up whatever market share they can while waiting for the industry to mature, or a new dynamic or opportunity to arise. This industry is changing so quickly, however, that things could be quite different in 6-12 months. Stay tuned - Chris Chinnock


DisplayCheck, Lewis Collier, 401-392-1023, [email protected]

IMAD Fred Hammett, 415-897-2703, [email protected]

ADO, Michael Newell, 805-497-1771, [email protected]

Corning Precision Lens, Mike Scarpa, 513-943-2079, [email protected]

Texas Instruments, Larry Hornbeck, 214-567-9844, [email protected]

Samsung Electronics, Jong Tae Lim, [82] -31-200-8975, [email protected]
 

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For What its Worth:

I saw one of these today at King's Grest Buys in Evansville Indiana. Price was $4K. I was really interested in this last year, so I tool a moment to look today. They were showing a newsprogram from HDNet on this and several other sets, and I was disappointed in the RCA. Color was weak, as was contrast (poor black level). I did not try to perform any adjustments. Viewing angle seemed about the same as CRT based sets, which surprised me as I was also looking at the new Sony GWII last week and was pleasantly surprised at the wide viewing angle on it, especially vertically.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by RMP in KY
For What its Worth:

I saw one of these today at King's Grest Buys in Evansville Indiana. Price was $4K. I was really interested in this last year, so I tool a moment to look today. They were showing a newsprogram from HDNet on this and several other sets, and I was disappointed in the RCA. Color was weak, as was contrast (poor black level). I did not try to perform any adjustments. Viewing angle seemed about the same as CRT based sets, which surprised me as I was also looking at the new Sony GWII last week and was pleasantly surprised at the wide viewing angle on it, especially vertically.
This is surprising, since the Press Release for this TV boasted a 180-degree viewing angle:

http://www.thomson.net/gb/06/r01/071101_2.htm


RCA Scenium hdtv products emphasize expressive design and impressive technology


HDTV Liquid Crystal On Silicon, High-Definition Plasma and Projection Sets, TruFlat HDTV Monitors Take Center Stage


NEW YORK, July 11, 2001


(snip)

RCA Scenium LCOS: Super-Bright, Unusually Thin


The secret behind the superlative picture of the widescreen RCA Scenium L50000 is Liquid Crystal On Silicon technology that manages ultra-bright light to deliver high-contrast, sharply focused color images. Utilizing three reflective light imagers and a sophisticated prism and lensing system, light is transformed into a laser-like beam and imprinted with a high-definition image that is then magnified and displayed in a perfectly aligned widescreen format. The result: a very light, very bright, high-definition television.


At about 100 pounds, the LCOS Model L50000 weighs 60 percent less than a comparable projection TV and it can be placed in a variety of room settings since the front-to-back cabinet depth is only 18 inches thin.


Thomson's flat matrix reflective light LCOS ensures sharp, uniform focus across the entire viewing area. Because of this revolutionary technology, no consumer adjustments to improve focus or convergence is necessary. Brightness is also uniform across the entire 50-inch widescreen, with the center of the screen and the far corners illuminated with precisely the same amount of light. The L50000 will display up to 2.76 million individually addressable pixels through its 3-imager matrix display. High-definition LCOS images are presented without any scanning lines, and the product can deliver HDTV at full, progressive, 1280 x 720 resolution with a horizontal viewing angle of virtually 180 degrees. Like each of Thomson's widescreen high-definition television sets, the new LCOS-powered HDTV includes integrated tuning and decoding capability for over-the-air ATSC 8VSB digital TV broadcasts, analog NTSC tuning, standard DIRECTV satellite service, and high-definition service from DIRECTV. The L50000 features a 3D Y/C Digital Frame Comb Filter to eliminate dot and edge crawl while providing smoother transitions between scene changes. The unit's SYNCROSCAN Component Video Input automatically adjusts the scan rate of component video inputs and allows for connection of regular or progressive-scan DVD players. Digital audio optical output, V-Chip Parental Control, advanced NTSC Twin-Tuner Picture-In-Picture, and an easily-replaceable lamp assembly are included. The L50000 comes with a convenient "learning" remote control unit that features a two-line liquid crystal display for confirmation of programming and selectable, all-button backlighting. Available at a suggested retail price of $7,499 the L50000 will be available later this summer. A matching base (model RRS50) will also be available.
 

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That article echoes a lot of what I've been saying for a year or more here. The train is leaving the station... Will LCOS really be aboard? I guess we'll know in a year or two, but if they are counting on this thing being brought to the promised land via China and Taiwan, then the race has been ceded to DLP and LCD already.


Mark
 

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I have seen the RCA LCoS set look really, really good, but I think RCA had a hard time making them so that they achieved that level of performance consistently. Which would be part of why it's going away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info, guys. I think I'll pass on this "deal" since I can get 507 that is definitely capable of a quality image for less money.
 
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