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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about upgrading my AVR, and wondered whether having built in Chrome-cast is a valuable feature for the future, I have a smart TV and can stream the apps I want at the moment. I'm not sure if Chrome-cast gives me flexibility in the future to add additional apps, that would be difficult without it. I'm intrigued by Costco's price on the Denon S750H, but it does not include Chrome-cast. I don't want to replace it in the future because I was not smart enough to anticipate this need

Forgive my ignorance, and thanks for any advice and explanation!
 

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Nothing to worry about, if you decide you need it in the future just get a Google Chromecast and plug it in to a spare HDMI port in your AVR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here is what scared me. The CNET review of the Denon S750H :


Listed these as weaknesses
The Bad No support for Chromecast. The black and white interface is woefully outdated compared to rivals. The previous model was a little more accomplished with music.

I assumed no support mean you could not use it, no support seems really misleading if all I need to do is buy a Chromecast unit. Why would they write it that way?
 

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Wow, that seems so simple and inexpensive! The only advantage of built in Chromecast is the saving on buying a Chromecast later?
Pretty much yes. I have Chromecast functionality via my Nvidia Shield TV's that I use for all other streaming requirements.
 

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The only advantage is convenience. My display has built-in Chromecast. Most BluRay players can stream from all the major apps. And as others have stated, you can always buy a Chromecast device (they are inexpensive), or any other streaming device (Roku, Firestick, Apple TV, etc, etc). So no, it's not critical for your AVR. I would base your decision on other features and audio quality.
 

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Like Mashie said, you can plug one into a spare port. The only time you will miss built-in Chromecast is if you have SO MANY devices that you are running out of ports in the back of your receiver and you need to kick one out to connect a new device. Even then, you can buy an HDMI splitter (Amazon.com : hdmi splitter) where multiple cables come in and one comes out and connects to the receiver.
 

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You should only be concerned with chromecast if you already own other devices that have chromecast and you want to build a multi room playback system.

The receiver you are looking at has HEOS which is a built in streaming system. It also does airplay 2, so you have streaming functionality built in. You can buy components that are heos or airplay2 compatible if you wish to build out a multiroom play back system.
 

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Here is what scared me.
That's why u came here, to talk to a real person, who happens to have 2K+ posts for a reason. These days the savvy consumer takes a few grains of salt on so called commercial reviews, many of which seem to be written by BOTS (a computer), or simple cut&paste from other dubious sources.

Sounds like a unanimous decision to me.
 

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One more: I have a full-home Chromecast based system (~10 Google Home Minis, 2 Google Home Hubs, 3 connected receivers, Nest thermostat, nest doorbell, etc.).... built-in Chromecast is nearly useless. My receivers all have Chromecast built-in... they ALSO have a Chromecast Ultra connected to them because built-in Chromecast is pretty crappy.

Most importantly - a real Chromecast (plugged into an HDMI port) will start up 100x faster and sync perfectly with all the other devices in my house. Built-in Chromecast takes forever to start up (especially when starting a "group" up that consists of multiple Chromecast capable boxes) and sometimes won't ever start playing (can't seem to sync with the others). Real Chromecasts are pretty rock-solid.

One last win for a real Chromecast Ultra: you can play Google Stadia on it (if that's your thing ;-)
 
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(To be clear: I don't even activate the built-in Chromecast in my receivers anymore... I just use a real Chromecast Ultra instead)
 
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If you are going to stream music, or stream whole house music, HEOS is solid. no going wrong with that.
 

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Wow, that seems so simple and inexpensive! The only advantage of built in Chromecast is the saving on buying a Chromecast later?
"Built in" Chromecast might mitigate/eliminate audio sync issues with the AVR and any speakers (wireless or wired) connected to it. I have a Denon AVR with a Chromecast (Audio) as one of the inputs and I cannot get music cast to the CC connected AVR to play in sync with my other freestanding CC connected speakers.
 

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What is a spare HDMI port? :) I've never had one. Must be like the elusive spare money.
Maybe it is related? Due to filling up all HDMI ports you have no spare money?
 
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Curious (dumb?) question:
We have an oldish Marantz AVR. Among the connections is a Chromecast Audio dongle. It is part of a whole home audio system.
Can a "regular" Chromecast device do audio only? The Chromecast Audio device has not been sold for 2-3 years.
 

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One more: I have a full-home Chromecast based system (~10 Google Home Minis, 2 Google Home Hubs, 3 connected receivers, Nest thermostat, nest doorbell, etc.).... built-in Chromecast is nearly useless. My receivers all have Chromecast built-in... they ALSO have a Chromecast Ultra connected to them because built-in Chromecast is pretty crappy.

Most importantly - a real Chromecast (plugged into an HDMI port) will start up 100x faster and sync perfectly with all the other devices in my house. Built-in Chromecast takes forever to start up (especially when starting a "group" up that consists of multiple Chromecast capable boxes) and sometimes won't ever start playing (can't seem to sync with the others). Real Chromecasts are pretty rock-solid.

One last win for a real Chromecast Ultra: you can play Google Stadia on it (if that's your thing ;-)
I have really been looking for an answer to this.
I am building a new house, and I am very google leaning, meaning, I want to have chromecast as my main streaming service for Audio. So if I have a AV reveiver, with a chromecast device that can be purchased new now in 2021, can that be inserted in to my AV reviever of choice, and that will then stream audio to that system? I have been trying to figure out if the latest chromecast devices also support audio, or are they video only?
 

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One more: I have a full-home Chromecast based system (~10 Google Home Minis, 2 Google Home Hubs, 3 connected receivers, Nest thermostat, nest doorbell, etc.).... built-in Chromecast is nearly useless. My receivers all have Chromecast built-in... they ALSO have a Chromecast Ultra connected to them because built-in Chromecast is pretty crappy.

Most importantly - a real Chromecast (plugged into an HDMI port) will start up 100x faster and sync perfectly with all the other devices in my house. Built-in Chromecast takes forever to start up (especially when starting a "group" up that consists of multiple Chromecast capable boxes) and sometimes won't ever start playing (can't seem to sync with the others). Real Chromecasts are pretty rock-solid.

One last win for a real Chromecast Ultra: you can play Google Stadia on it (if that's your thing ;-)
You're paying for redundancy and using a valuable HDMI input on all your receivers. Also you can only play Stadia on a CCU if you buy the Stadia controller.
My setup also has redundancy because My TV, AVR and Shield all have CC ability. I've never noticed any difference in any of them but I haven't looked for differences though.
The best reason to get an AVR w/ CC built in is so you can cast audio without turning the TV on. My AVR only has 1 HDMI input and 1 HDMI ARC port (input/output), and all but my disk player goes to the TV first then ARC to the AVR. I always cast to the Shield because it seems to have the fewest problems.
 
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