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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!


So I got this blu-ray drive for my HTPC for my birthday and I wanted to get help from you guys. I know there is a lot of information on this site, but its kinda of overwhelming. If anyone could give me a quick rundown of the basic things I need to do it would be greatly appreciated.


Here's what I have so far.


Blu-ray is installed and powerdvd 9 (that came bundle) is installed.


Here are my basic specs:

win7 32-bit

ATI 4670

I use WMC for all my ripped movies and tv shows.


Any feedback from your guys would be great! Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So I loaded up Avatar today and it is awesome. I tough I would have to do some special tweaking or something to make this work, but everything seems running great.


My concerns is the audio. I currently do not have any particular audio system other than my 2.1 sound from my Sharp TV (yeah I know...). I recently installed the realtek drivers for my ATI 4670, but I'm surely not getting the full potential of HD audio. Should I maybe look for some speaker (like this http://ncix.com/products/index.php?s...h&promoid=1254 ) or maybe have my audio through a sound card? What should I go for here?


Also, I realized I cannot get to the movie menu once the movie started with my MCE remote. Only way to access it is the mouse. Can you guys recommended something to fix this.


One last thing, Powerdvd9 came bundle with the blu-ray player, but it doesn't seem to be the full software, is the upgrade to the full v10 worth it? It would cost me 48$.


Thanks for your help!
 

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Quote:
but I'm surely not getting the full potential of HD audio

(sigh...)


This is one of those cases where (perhaps) too much reading can be detrimental. Plain old DD (dolby digital) over a rudimentary 5.1 speaker system will blow the doors off your tv sound. The system you listed is a start in the right direction, although it's really a dead end as far as expandability goes. (nothing wrong with that, btw)

If you're going to be building an audio system the first step would be to listen to a few different configurations and figure out how they fit with your budget. If you've got $400-the system above is fine.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by audit13 /forum/post/19521264


I got the oem version of TMT3 with my Asus Xonar HDAV and PDVD with my LG burner. Between the two, I would definitely go with TMT.

I vote for TMT3, too.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by exile550 /forum/post/19520152


Also, I realized I cannot get to the movie menu once the movie started with my MCE remote. Only way to access it is the mouse. Can you guys recommended something to fix this.

Press the 'i' button on the MCE remote and it will work as a 'Right-Click' which will then allow you to choose from different options.

Quote:
Originally Posted by exile550 /forum/post/19520152


I'm surely not getting the full potential of HD audio.

The most important component in any audio system are the speakers.

To obtain HD audio, you will need really good speakers.

Doesn't matter how much you spend on electronics, if the speakers are crappy, the end result will be crappy.

Let me put it this way: DVD quality audio on good speakers will sound similar to HD audio played on crappy speakers.

I know the Z5500 is regarded as good but to realize the full potential of HD audio, you need to go separates.

'Separates' means buying all the components separately and not a pre-packaged Home Theater System.

Buy a decent AVR, choose speakers individually and pair them with a good quality subwoofer (entry-level starts at $350-$400).

Get the best Center Channel that you can afford; 70% of the audio in movies come from the center channel and as such, it should be the highest quality possible. Pick the fronts (L & R) & surrounds from the same brand's lineup.

Low Frequency Effects (LFE) or the '.1' channel in the audio track can go as low as 15 Hz or even lower. These sounds cannot be heard by a human ear but a good subwoofer can reproduce these sound effects and can be felt around the listening area.

Hence a good-quality sub should be able to go at least to 18 Hz. These would be considered as entry-level and start at $350 or so.

It depends on a person's personal preference on what kind of quality they want and how much they are willing to invest.

A decent audio setup would cost:

LCR - $60, $70, $60

Surrounds - $80 (2) or $160 (4)

Subwoofer - $400

AVR - $300


All told, you are looking at $1000 or so for a decent audio setup that can give you the full benefit of HD audio.


This is just my perspective and opinions vary depend on who you talk to.

But one thing is for certain, $400 is not going to get you anywhere close to quality high-def sound.
 
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