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Hello, I'm brand new to this forum, and relatively new to home audio. I have had a bookshelf system for a while but nothing compares to sound of floorstanding speakers. I bought a pair of Polk Audio Monitor 60II a week ago, and a Teac AG-790A, Newegg had a rather large discount on the 60II's around $109 each I think. They sound great for movies, and MP3's. I have this all setup in my 10'x14' bedroom, right now about 7' apart from each other, I will have them at either sides of the room once I do some reconfiguring.


Teac AG-790A Receiver

2x Polk Monitor 60II

Pyramid 16G Wire


First question is I have an old JVC turntable connected to the phono input on my reciever, the ground is connected to the receiver also. The output from the phono seems very underpowered compared to when I play MP3's and at certain levels, the sound starts to degrade, its not as crisp and clear, and almost sounds like it is clipping. What can I do to fix it?


Second question is about equalizers. The receiver I have only has simple treble and bass adjustments, I've been wondering if they are worth messing with, or do you introduce more noise into the equation? I've read that you can hook most equalizers up to the tape loop on a receiver, which mine has, which allows you to bypass if needed. Also, if I were to go new, which is a good economical one, under $100, or used under $50. I'm wondering if that might help the sound of my record player also?


Third question is about an external powered subwoofer that I have, its an RCA, I'm not sure of the model number off the top of my head but it was given to me like 10 years ago, and I had it connect via RCA to my Sony bookshelf system(this was back when I was into rap/boom boom music). I'm looking for a more balanced sound now.Anyways, the subwoofer has the high level input and outputs for if you don't have a subwoofer output on your receiver. I tried hook it up to my receiver via the B output terminals and connecting it to the high level inputs on the subwoofer, however when doing that, and having both A/B channels selected, the sound on my front's cut out and all I could hear was the subwoofer. The subwoofer is rated for 4ohms, which I'm sure has something to do with it...


I'll probably have more questions down the road, I'm starting to try and learn the science behind audio and this forum seems like a good place to start.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fas0latid0 /forum/post/20844927


Hello, I'm brand new to this forum, and relatively new to home audio. I have had a bookshelf system for a while but nothing compares to sound of floorstanding speakers. I bought a pair of Polk Audio Monitor 60II a week ago, and a Teac AG-790A, Newegg had a rather large discount on the 60II's around $109 each I think. They sound great for movies, and MP3's. I have this all setup in my 10'x14' bedroom, right now about 7' apart from each other, I will have them at either sides of the room once I do some reconfiguring.

I hope you don't mean opposing one another, on opposite walls - I would strongly advise against that.

Quote:
First question is I have an old JVC turntable connected to the phono input on my reciever, the ground is connected to the receiver also. The output from the phono seems very underpowered compared to when I play MP3's and at certain levels, the sound starts to degrade, its not as crisp and clear, and almost sounds like it is clipping. What can I do to fix it?

Not all devices have uniform output levels, and and dynamic range is also a factor. Vinyl usually has more of it, and outputs at a lower level, compared to your highly compressed (and likely very cleanly encoded) mp3s. If you're turning things up to absurd levels and causing the receiver to clip, that's a no-no.


Read this for somewhat of an understanding:
http://audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=58829


One other reality could be that the turntable or the phono stage in your receiver isn't up to the task, and is introducing noise.

Quote:
Second question is about equalizers. The receiver I have only has simple treble and bass adjustments, I've been wondering if they are worth messing with, or do you introduce more noise into the equation? I've read that you can hook most equalizers up to the tape loop on a receiver, which mine has, which allows you to bypass if needed. Also, if I were to go new, which is a good economical one, under $100, or used under $50. I'm wondering if that might help the sound of my record player also?

What are you intending to solve with an EQ?


Do you feel the need to adjust the tone controls?


As far as "introducing more noise" - have you played with them?


Generally speaking, at least on paper, an EQ or similar device can raise the noise floor of a given system, although in practice this is rarely audible. Some receivers include features named "Direct" or "Pure" or similar, which bypass internal tone controls (and depending on the model, a lot of other stuff) to try and improve the overall fidelity of the system. Usually these switches do not produce an audible effect either. Or at least, if they do, it's usually not something you'll notice while listening to music at a reasonable distance.


All of that said, stand-alone equalizers are somewhat out of fashion (for reasons that escape me) - you can find a number of quality used units, otherwise you'll need to look at the pro/studio segment to find something brand new (dbx, BBE, etc). I probably wouldn't bother, but it's your choice (it should not hurt anything).

Quote:
Third question is about an external powered subwoofer that I have, its an RCA, I'm not sure of the model number off the top of my head but it was given to me like 10 years ago, and I had it connect via RCA to my Sony bookshelf system(this was back when I was into rap/boom boom music). I'm looking for a more balanced sound now.Anyways, the subwoofer has the high level input and outputs for if you don't have a subwoofer output on your receiver. I tried hook it up to my receiver via the B output terminals and connecting it to the high level inputs on the subwoofer, however when doing that, and having both A/B channels selected, the sound on my front's cut out and all I could hear was the subwoofer. The subwoofer is rated for 4ohms, which I'm sure has something to do with it...

Is this a powered or passive subwoofer? I ask because you mention it having an impedance.


That said, any reason you can't connect through it (between the receiver and the speakers)? That would be my first suggestion.
 
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