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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all i just got a new samsung 55" led tv model is UN55D6000


i am trying to figure out best way to calibrate it since i have multiple devices like ps3, xbox 360, boxee box, apple tv

i also just got a Onkyo NR709 receiver

what is the best way to calibrate my tv?

do i plug directly to receiver or to tv? and do i not plug any hdmi sources into reciever?

i am going to use the disney wow bluray to calibrate


any help will be greatly appreciated
 

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You're going to want everything run through your receiver (assuming it does HDMI pass through) and calibrate from there. Use the PS3 and the WOW disc to calibrate for HD. The xbox360 may need adjustment - you could use a DVD based calibration disc to get it calibrated specifically. With the boxee box and apple tv you'll likely be fine with using the WOW calibration done through the PS3.


Congrats on the new TV, have fun!
 

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From what I understand and have read, the set should be pretty close to perfect in "Movie" mode as far as grayscale tracking, D65 white point, and color gamut accuracy is concerned (when the color gamut is on the default "Auto" mode)


This is good news, since the WoW disc can take care of the remaining small stuff for you with its patterns.


Here is a good review of the set that shows some settings. Maybe reference them as a guideline if needed, but do not use the white balance settings provided, as those will be different for each set, and as you can see in the review, there is really no visual benefit:

http://www.hometheater.com/content/s...-labs-measures
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanHomsey /forum/post/20848963


You're going to want everything run through your receiver (assuming it does HDMI pass through) and calibrate from there. Use the PS3 and the WOW disc to calibrate for HD. The xbox360 may need adjustment - you could use a DVD based calibration disc to get it calibrated specifically. With the boxee box and apple tv you'll likely be fine with using the WOW calibration done through the PS3.


Congrats on the new TV, have fun!

i am a bit confused once i calibrate using PS3 with hdmi pass through on receiver how can i calibrate just for xbox? since i am using only 1 hdmi input on tv those settings will be applied for all devices since i will have all devices going thru receivers hdmi inputs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by extrafuzzyllama /forum/post/20850011


i am a bit confused once i calibrate using PS3 with hdmi pass through on receiver how can i calibrate just for xbox? since i am using only 1 hdmi input on tv those settings will be applied for all devices since i will have all devices going thru receivers hdmi inputs.

You will find differences of opinion on whether you should calibrate your tv with just a cal disk (WoW or AVS HD709) thru your BD player only, or attempt to calibrate all of your inputs (which is difficult to do). I just calibrated my set thru the BD player (which goes thru the AVR to the tv) and left it at that for my OTA tv and my ATV2. I had to make some minor adjustments for my tastes on OTA and the ATV2 but basically I use the same cal for all on my devices.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by extrafuzzyllama /forum/post/20850011


i am a bit confused once i calibrate using PS3 with hdmi pass through on receiver how can i calibrate just for xbox? since i am using only 1 hdmi input on tv those settings will be applied for all devices since i will have all devices going thru receivers hdmi inputs.

I'm not familiar with your set but most TV's I've tinkered with these days tend to have multiple programmable settings within a single input. My LG LCD has approximately 5 per input.


It sounds like, from the previous post, that "Movie" mode is the way to go for your WoW calibration (done through the PS3).


If you plan on watching dvd's through the Xbox it's likely it will require a separate calibration. It's been a few years since I've calibrated an Xbox but I recall it's brightness being much higher than that of my PS3. You would need a DVD calibration disc for that however. Apparently gaming standards are pretty loosely applied so a general calibration (either the WoW one done via the PS3 or a separate one done through the dvd player on the xbox) will likely work fine with them, often in game they have adjustments for the particular game, that would be your best bet to fine tune from there. As far as streaming goes on the xbox - my dvd calibration (done years ago) has always looked good to me. There's no real accurate way to calibrate for streaming that I know of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot /forum/post/20850105


You will find differences of opinion on whether you should calibrate your tv with just a cal disk (WoW or AVS HD709) thru your BD player only, or attempt to calibrate all of your inputs (which is difficult to do). I just calibrated my set thru the BD player (which goes thru the AVR to the tv) and left it at that for my OTA tv and my ATV2. I had to make some minor adjustments for my tastes on OTA and the ATV2 but basically I use the same cal for all on my devices.

once i calibrate using PS3 bluray and hook all devices thru receiver. if i want to make a few adjustements for other devices do i have to go into tv settings and change those settings i just calibrated? like for the xbox and gaming i have to change a few settings and to watch a bluray lets say i have to go back and revert those few changes every single time?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by extrafuzzyllama /forum/post/20850123


once i calibrate using PS3 bluray and hook all devices thru receiver. if i want to make a few adjustements for other devices do i have to go into tv settings and change those settings i just calibrated? like for the xbox and gaming i have to change a few settings and to watch a bluray lets say i have to go back and revert those few changes every single time?

If you do a separate calibration for different sources then you would need to switch from one picture "setting" to another, each time you change sources, yes.


If there is only one programmable picture setting for each input then it wouldnt really be feasible to continuously change individual settings whenever you chance sources. Although I do recall doing just that when I was stuck in that scenario with an old Sony tube CRT HDTV. I'd imagine yours has multiple settings for each input though. The fact that someone mentioned a "movie mode" above confirms that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ok i think i can use the bluray for calibration then for gaming i can use the either movie or standard picture settings modes so i can lets say use Standard for everything and then

Movie for gaming since the Dynamic and Natural picture modes dont allow for Advanced Pictures changes to be made while in those 2 modes.


does that sound like a good idea?


and its best to calibrate directly connected to tv first right? like using my ps3 on the hdmi input on tv i intend to connect the receiver to
 

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You're going to want to calibrate with it hooked up through the receiver. The HDMI pass through on the receiver shouldn't alter the signal at all but the fact is sometimes they do. If you can, its best to have everything in the signal path when calibrating.


If I were you I would use "Movie" mode for watching movies, streaming from the PS3, etc. redwolf4k mentioned above that it is going to be the most accurate calibrated 'under the hood' (ie greyscale, which is white balance, and color gamut, which is color accuracy). Since game manufacturers are loose in their standards it wouldn't make much sense to use the most accurately calibrated settings for it. Id use "Standard" for gaming (if you intend to use a DVD calibration disc to make the settings), and "Movie" for your PS3 WOW calibration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanHomsey /forum/post/20850290


You're going to want to calibrate with it hooked up through the receiver. The HDMI pass through on the receiver shouldn't alter the signal at all but the fact is sometimes they do. If you can, its best to have everything in the signal path when calibrating.


If I were you I would use "Movie" mode for watching movies, streaming from the PS3, etc. redwolf4k mentioned above that it is going to be the most accurate calibrated 'under the hood' (ie greyscale, which is white balance, and color gamut, which is color accuracy). Since game manufacturers are loose in their standards it wouldn't make much sense to use the most accurately calibrated settings for it. Id use "Standard" for gaming (if you intend to use a DVD calibration disc to make the settings), and "Movie" for your PS3 WOW calibration.

ok thanks so i will use the Movie mode for PS3 calibration and those settings will apply to ps3, apple tv and my other media player the boxee box. and the Standard mode for Gaming. to calibrate for gaming what exactly should i do? my main gaming console is the xbox 360 using hdmi into receiver btw


and thanks for all the help guys
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by extrafuzzyllama /forum/post/20850315


to calibrate for gaming what exactly should i do?

You'd have to get a DVD calibration disc to calibrate specifically for the xbox360.


You could always just see how the PS3/WOW calibration does on the xbox360 and go from there. If you are using the 360 primarily for just gaming its not a big deal anyway - as usually there are brightness settings in the settings menu of the actual game. I personally play COD and used the brightness pattern/slider bar in the settings menu of it to adjust for that game specifically.
 

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It's likely that you could find the necessary patterns for free somewhere online. But I believe DVE (Digital Video Essentials) was generally thought of one of the better ones: http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Video-...3962741&sr=1-2


I have WOW and the Spears and Munsil disc and I generally use the free AVS709 (HD) disc found free here: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=948496


That obviously wont work for your DVD player but again, I imagine, somewhere, there is something similar in DVD form.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by extrafuzzyllama /forum/post/20850421


is there any DVD calibration disc you would recommend for the Xbox360?

I'm pretty sure your PS3 calibration will work with Xbox 360. Just make sure to use YCbCr709 color space and Standard reference levels to match the YCbCr colorspace and Super-White ON on the PS3.


EDIT: I just verified this with the MP4 version of the AVSHD709 Disc on the Xbox 360. The brightness and contrast settings match those with the AVCHD version of the AVSHD709 Disc on the PS3.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U /forum/post/20850726


I'm pretty sure your PS3 calibration will work with Xbox 360. Just make sure to use YCbCr709 color space and Standard reference levels to match the YCbCr colorspace and Super-White ON on the PS3.


EDIT: I just verified this with the MP4 version of the AVSHD709 Disc on the Xbox 360. The brightness and contrast settings match those with the AVCHD version of the AVSHD709 Disc on the PS3.

That's great news for extrafuzzyllama here. So dont worry about doing a separate calibration for the 360.


Usually what gamers are most concerned about is input lag. Often there is a "game" mode that reduces the internal processing to minimize input lag. Example of what I mean by "input lag" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pi2OE6hSh00
 

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When you ask "what is the best way to calibrate my TV?"... what exactly do you think you are asking?


Calibration, as we are talking about it in this forum thread means you have a meter (colorimeter) which will cost $200 or more for anything remotely useful, calibration software (ranges from free to $3000+), and a test pattern source which might be a disc for a Bu-ray player or a standalone video signal generator (free to $4000+).


The best way to calibrate your TV is to learn how to do it yourself and purchase the equipment you need then spend 50 to 100 hours practicing and learning... or pay a professional calibrator to do all that for you (typically $250-$500 depending on where you live and the range of useful controls in your particular TV).


ALso, just a point of clarification... you said you have "an LED TV"... you do understand that you have an LCD TV that happens to have LEDs creating the light necessary to make the LCD images visible... right? Nobody is making TVs right now that actually have LEDs forming the images (Sony discontinued a hideously expensive organic LED TV that was 11" diagonal and another Asian brand was saying they were going to release large size organic LED panel TVs, but I haven't heard that any of those have actually started to be sold.


At any rate, your images are produced by an LCD panel with white or red/gree/blue LEDs behind the panel producing the light needed to make the LCD images visible.
 
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