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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at getting a Mits HC9000C or a JVC RS60. A couple of questions. Can I assume the shorter the throw distance the brighter the picture? Max throw distance in this room would be 15 feet. Also, the projects say they can adjust for horizonal and verticle angles. I am sure thats true, but does it effect the picture quality vs head on?


Thanks,


Lowell
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LowellG /forum/post/20790726


I am looking at getting a Mits HC9000C or a JVC RS60. A couple of questions. Can I assume the shorter the throw distance the brighter the picture? Max throw distance in this room would be 15 feet. Also, the projects say they can adjust for horizonal and verticle angles. I am sure thats true, but does it effect the picture quality vs head on?


Thanks,


Lowell

Always best if you can minimize the use of lens shift.
 

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The closer the projector to the screen will give you a brighter picture and a reduced contrast ratio. The farther the projector from the screen, the less brightness (in foot Lamberts) but better contrast ratio. That is with all other variable being equal.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LowellG /forum/post/20790726


I am looking at getting a Mits HC9000C or a JVC RS60. A couple of questions. Can I assume the shorter the throw distance the brighter the picture?

For a specific projector, yes, as noted above you can expect closer throws to result in a brighter image, and longer throws to result in better contrast. How much depends on the projector's optics.


You can't though, expect one projector placed closer to the screen to be brighter than a different one placed farther away, there are more variables at play in that situation.

Quote:
Max throw distance in this room would be 15 feet. Also, the projects say they can adjust for horizonal and verticle angles. I am sure thats true, but does it effect the picture quality vs head on?

Make sure they're talking "lens shift" and not "keystone correction". Lens shift can theoretically affect picture quality, and it's best to have your projector centered as much as possible, but lens shift's visual impact is definitely one of the things to worry about least, you probably won't be able to tell. Keystone Correction should be avoided at all costs though.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LowellG /forum/post/20790726


I am looking at getting a Mits HC9000C or a JVC RS60. A couple of questions. Can I assume the shorter the throw distance the brighter the picture? Max throw distance in this room would be 15 feet. Also, the projects say they can adjust for horizonal and verticle angles. I am sure thats true, but does it effect the picture quality vs head on?


Thanks,


Lowell

Lowell - you can save a lot of money by just purchasing an RS40 vs the RS60. beyond some ramblings on a marketing PDF from JVC, there is going to be little real world difference between these projectors. The RS40 is brighter than the RS50/RS60 and the mid/high level JVC's have issues with the color management system and gamma controls that JVC is not going to fix.


There are also wide reports of lamp issues for all 3 JVC models, it is a bit of coins toss if you get a lamp that will last past a few hundred hours. After owning an RS40 and RS50, I would give my $$ next time to Sony or Mitsubishi just based on the lamp issues alone.


Mitsubishi has a respectable 500 hour / 1 year warranty, JVC is a weak 90 days, even for the expensive RS60.
 

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You say you know nothing about projectors but are contemplating either a $10K Mitsubishi or a $12 JVC. Both of these projectors are top of the line machines (in their respective product lines). Both have powered focus and other high end features..


I would be a shame to use either one in anything but a well designed and light controlled Home Theater. Presumably the architecture, furniture, electronics, and sound system will cost more - probably much more - than the cost of the projector. If that's where you are going you should probably hire a consultant/installer rather than the advice of readers of this forum. You will be spending $25K +.


Most newbies start with a more modest projector while they assemble the other components.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
PLB, I appreciate the warning. While I am new to projectors, I am not new to HT and all the things you mentioned, just projectors. Unfortunately I am at that 2-3 year urge to upgrade point. I have went from RPTVs to LCDs to Plasmas and was considering a Laservue vs a projector. Add that to multiple receivers and speaker upgrades, etc. Plus I can get the Mits and JVC for significantly less than retail through my Direct Buy membership. Part of me likes the no hassel factor of that or maybe even their 82" or 92" models if I am putting towers and sub up front anyhow. It's not a big room 13x16, but I figured I could put 106" screen in.


I need to look at more pictures of HTs to see what people do about speaker placement around a large screen. I will not be doing in-walls and I really don't want on-walls, but I want a nice streamlined front to look at. I am considering going with no CC because it appears the screen will be less than 24" from the ground.


Thanks,


Lowell
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh, I also forgot to mention my real downside in going with one of the giant Mits TVs. When this upgrade bug hits again it will be real obvious to my wife as I try and change things in an out. I can probably sneek a new projector in and she will never know the difference. :)
 

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The large, RP Mitsubishi units are quite nice .. I've had the pleasure to calibrate a couple .. and substantially less money than your PJ's mentioned .. and if the upgrade itch hit, what would you upgrade to .. ?? No one else is making these large DLP units ..


On the PJ .. as I have never noticed any PQ degradation by using moderate amounts of lens shift .. and I don't think most would find the use of shift bothersome ..
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LowellG
PLB, I appreciate the warning. While I am new to projectors, I am not new to HT and all the things you mentioned, just projectors. Unfortunately I am at that 2-3 year urge to upgrade point. I have went from RPTVs to LCDs to Plasmas and was considering a Laservue vs a projector. Add that to multiple receivers and speaker upgrades, etc. Plus I can get the Mits and JVC for significantly less than retail through my Direct Buy membership. Part of me likes the no hassel factor of that or maybe even their 82" or 92" models if I am putting towers and sub up front anyhow. It's not a big room 13x16, but I figured I could put 106" screen in.


I need to look at more pictures of HTs to see what people do about speaker placement around a large screen. I will not be doing in-walls and I really don't want on-walls, but I want a nice streamlined front to look at. I am considering going with no CC because it appears the screen will be less than 24" from the ground.


Thanks,


Lowell
Don't rule out in-wall speakers. They solve a lot of problems and there are good in-wall speakers out there. Good in-wall speakers usually cost more money, but it gives you a clean look and takes up little space in a small room. They also allow you to have correct speaker placement using an AT screen. An in-wall speaker usually has less problems with room interations compared to a box speaker. The better in-wall speakers are designed with an enclosure. Look at Triad; http://www.triadspeakers.com/products/iwg6lcr.html and RBH: http://www.rbhsound.com/inwall_ref.php . I am very familiar with the RBH speakers. I use the SI-760's in one of my rooms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Originally Posted by mjg100 /forum/post/20792655


Don't rule out in-wall speakers. They solve a lot of problems and there are good in-wall speakers out there. Good in-wall speakers usually cost more money, but it gives you a clean look and takes up little space in a small room. They also allow you to have correct speaker placement using an AT screen. An in-wall speaker usually has less problems with room interations compared to a box speaker. The better in-wall speakers are designed with an enclosure. Look at Triad; http://www.triadspeakers.com/products/iwg6lcr.html and RBH: http://www.rbhsound.com/inwall_ref.php . I am very familiar with the RBH speakers. I use the SI-760's in one of my rooms.

You are right, they do have their advantages. I would want a sealed inwall though. I tried out a 3-way Sonance one time and thought they sounded very good; very detailed. If I did go with in walls what do you think about Atlantic Tech? I am looking at thesehttp:// www.atlantictechnology.com/default.asp?NodeId=134 I can get great deals on Atlantic Tech, Polk, JBL, Boston Acoustics, Canton and Jamo too.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LowellG /forum/post/20792990


You are right, they do have their advantages. I would want a sealed inwall though. I tried out a 3-way Sonance one time and thought they sounded very good; very detailed. If I did go with in walls what do you think about Atlantic Tech? I am looking at thesehttp:// www.atlantictechnology.com/default.asp?NodeId=134 I can get great deals on Atlantic Tech, Polk, JBL, Boston Acoustics, Canton and Jamo too.

The in-wall's that I suggested have enclosures. The AT in-walls may be okay, I have not heard them.
 
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