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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No 4.0 Ghz Processor from Intel

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...4gigahertzchip



Technology - USATODAY.com

USA TODAY

Intel pulls plug on 4-gigahertz chip


Fri Oct 15, 7:03 AM ET



By Michelle Kessler, USA TODAY


In another embarrassing about-face, No. 1 chipmaker Intel (INTC) told customers Thursday that it will not make a much-touted 4-gigahertz version of its Pentium 4 PC processor.



The long-promised chip was supposed to power the fastest-ever generation of Intel-based PCs early next year. Instead, Intel will release another chip that has fewer gigahertz but is made faster in other ways. PC users shouldn't be able to tell the difference, Intel says.


But the public change of tune hints at more problems at Intel, which has struggled with production and inventory. "It's another in a series of eye-opening acknowledgments," says equity analyst Rick Whittington at Caris & Co.


Intel shares fell 2% to $20.51 Thursday.


In recent months, Intel delayed several chips and recalled defective ones. It overestimated demand, creating an inventory glut. It was forced to hastily copy a popular chip from smaller rival Advanced Micro Devices.


Thursday's cancellation is part of Intel's effort to fix those problems, it says. It will free up engineers to work on upcoming "dual core" chips, which have two processors instead of one and are therefore faster. They will also work on tweaking chip design to squeeze out more performance. The shift will cause more changes in Intel's product plans, the company says.


Intel's shift marks a dramatic change for the chip industry, which is moving away from boosts in megahertz and gigahertz for the first time since the PC was invented.


Intel has long touted the clock speeds, or basic data-crunching ability, of its processors, and made GHZ speeds almost synonymous with performance. But in reality, "There are several dials on the panel you can twist," to boost a processor's speed, says chip analyst Tony Massimini at Semico Research.


The chips that will replace Intel's 4 GHz processor get a performance boost from more short-term memory storage. That keeps more data handy, so the chip spends less time retrieving it. It's like having a book on your nightstand instead of at the library, says PC chip analyst Dean McCarron of Mercury Research.


The change should save Intel money, Whittington says. Adding memory to an existing processor is generally easier and cheaper than building a higher GHz chip. And it should help Intel better use factories slowed by the inventory glut.


The new chips may also be easier to sell to computer makers. Generally, the more GHz a processor has, the more heat it generates. Some of Intel's existing high-end chips run so hot they require a special fan, which hurt sales and contributed to lower-than-expected earnings in Intel's most recent quarter, Whittington says. The 4-GHz chips would have been even hotter.
 

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Yea maybe so! However, I really don’t need 850 Horsepower in my car because it is illegal to use it on most streets. But I still want to have it just for bragging rights. For instance the new Mazda RX-8 was listed as having about 250 HP. When people actually received their cars and measured the HP they found that the car only had about 230. Mazda retested their engines and they agreed that the HP figure was incorrect and they offered to buy back all of the RX-8s. Now the car really didn’t have the advertised Horsepower at the crank but who cares the car was capable of meeting all of the 0-60 and quarter mile times that were advertised. That is what should really matter but the truth is most people don’t want to use this performance they just want to be able to brag about it.
 

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So buy the 3.8ghz and know that you have the fastest.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by EricN
This is a good thing. What we have now is the equivalent of a market that thinks the only measure of a car is the engine's peak horsepower.
You might want to make that RPM, horsepower would be the equivalent of real useable power. Think P4 is supercharged 4 cylinder producing 400HP out 10000rpm, compared to an Athlon 64 being a V8 producing 400HP at 5000rpm.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by stanger89
You might want to make that RPM, horsepower would be the equivalent of real useable power. Think P4 is supercharged 4 cylinder producing 400HP out 10000rpm, compared to an Athlon 64 being a V8 producing 400HP at 5000rpm.


Ayyyupppp.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by EricN
This is a good thing. What we have now is the equivalent of a market that thinks the only measure of a car is the engine's peak horsepower.
its all about the torque ;)


but seriously i would like to see intel push their mobile designs into the desktop, im sure you have all read about the dual core 4mb cache Pentium M's
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by shigaloo
its all about the torque
In the case of product marketing, it's all about the tongue.


Gary
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by stanger89
You might want to make that RPM, horsepower would be the equivalent of real useable power. Think P4 is supercharged 4 cylinder producing 400HP out 10000rpm, compared to an Athlon 64 being a V8 producing 400HP at 5000rpm.
I don't believe this to be a very accurate depiction since it implies that the Athlon is more usable power.


but the high reving low displacement, hi heat P4 is deffinetly accurate v

the low reving, higher displacement, lower heat A64.


The thing is there is no such thing as driving around in traffic with a computer.


It's drag racing 24/7 where HP (and weight, but that's only for the automotive case) rules.
 

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I also doubt we'll see a 3 GHz Athlon 64. It's like we've reached a dead end with PC clock speed. To our luck the Athlon XP was superceded by the Athlon 64.


Perhaps now we'll see a push towards how we can best use the available clock speed instead of a hunger for more speed. Like for instance the X86-64 extensions, C'n'Q, etc.
 

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The A64 will eventually hit 3ghz, they are about to roll out their 2.6ghz chips, and their 90nm tech that doesn't seem to have the same problems as intels did.


Being they raise the bar 200mhz each time expect a 3ghz A64 this time next year.


Althought their fastest processor at that time may be a dual 2.6ghz core.



Mores law is about doubling transistor density every 18mo which had the side effect of ramping clock speeds through the die shrink process.


The P4 was an aboration of a design, but if you look at AMD they've slowly been ramping clock speed on a steady path.


Clock speed will continue to grow, but what is done with the extra transitors will become more important than overall clock speed has already become a more important factor.
 

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I hope that Intel will finally think about releasing a 64-bit CPU for consumers since until they do we won't see a 64-bit version of Windows. This is because Microsoft and Intel are pretty close and until Intel releases a 64-bit CPU we will continue to see delays in a Windows XP 64-bit edition.
 

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I think it's sort of ironic that Intel is suffering from it's own advertising (mis)campaign.... it was Intel that sold the public on horsepower (clock speed) as a measure of performance and now it is Intel that will suffer the most while trying to convince the same public that horsepower isn't important anymore... funny.


Clock speeds have not hit a wall... they will just go up much more slowly. Until that is a new technology becomes available to force them up again. In many ways it's nice to see a greater emphasis put on other aspects of processor performance...
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mnn1265
I think it's sort of ironic that Intel is suffering from it's own advertising (mis)campaign.... it was Intel that sold the public on horsepower (clock speed) as a measure of performance and now it is Intel that will suffer the most while trying to convince the same public that horsepower isn't important anymore... funny.


Clock speeds have not hit a wall... they will just go up much more slowly. Until that is a new technology becomes available to force them up again. In many ways it's nice to see a greater emphasis put on other aspects of processor performance...
You've got that right. The mighty Intel hype machine has been hurt yet again. They pass more gas than a refinery.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mnn1265
I think it's sort of ironic that Intel is suffering from it's own advertising (mis)campaign.... it was Intel that sold the public on horsepower (clock speed) as a measure of performance and now it is Intel that will suffer the most while trying to convince the same public that horsepower isn't important anymore... funny.


Clock speeds have not hit a wall... they will just go up much more slowly. Until that is a new technology becomes available to force them up again. In many ways it's nice to see a greater emphasis put on other aspects of processor performance...
Intel's Hype campaign sold the world on RPM's not HP.


That's the thing. RPM's don't mean anything a WD raptor HD spins 10,000 rpms, segate cheteas spin 15,000, and my subaru can only do 7000, let's see which spindle or crank shaft can actually do the most work?


HP = work

RPM = revolutions which mean nothing about the amout of work done with out MHZ


IP/s = instruction per second = work

MHZ = cycles per second means nothing with out the amount of work done per cycle.



I know I'm nit picking, but if we could rate processors in HP it would make for far mor valid comparsions than MHz
 

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These car/CPU comparisons are hurting my brain! :D


Not quite sure what to make of this news other than I hope what they do next will actually benefit real world performance for encoding times and feature other optimizations that help things such as video processing and multi-tasking.


We may have hit some sort of barrier but we still have a looong ass way to go. People saying it takes a full day or more to encode a 640x480 DVD has always sounded silly to me.
 
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