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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay. New to HT so forgive if these are dumb questions.


The installation of my Infocus SP 5700 and Firehawk will be complete in the morning. What settings should I or should I not be messing with on the projector?


It is in a completely light controlled basement room so ambient light is not an issue.


Specifically...


I put Seabiscuit in tonight (no sound hooked up yet). It appeared that facial tones were better with the color temp set at the 9300 (?) setting. Should it?


Should I be running in power saver mode or not?


At times it seems the picture is out of focus. Is that something I should tinker with or should I have the installers mess with it?


Also seems to be bleeding over on the felt frame about 1.5 inches. Can I tighten that up myself?


As far as color settings go. Should I mess with them or should I have them calibrated or what?


Thanks,

Jeff
 

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Jeff -


The 5700 is pretty much dead on out of the box, so I can't imagine why you'd need to adjust any of the picture parameters.


6500K is usually what will yield what the director intended. So many movies are tinted these days it's hard to determine what's proper some times. If you like one of the other settings, use it! That's what it's there for. Still, 6500K will be the most "accurate."


The 5700 is so bright that I can't see any reason to run it in high brightness mode. That, plus the bulb will last longer in the lower setting.


Focus is pretty straightforward on a projector. Bring up the menu and adjust focus until the letters look the sharpest. If something looks out of focus after that, it's the source, not the projector.


Sure, you can adjust the zoom until there is no bleed into the velvet surround. Adjust your focus AFTER you adjust the zoom.


Remember, the projector is NOT very complicated - don't be afraid of it, it's just a dumb box with even less to mess with than a RPTV, for example.


Even non-Infocus fans will usually admit that the out of box performance of the 5700 and 7200 is about spot on, and calibrating is not usually necessary. Yes, you could probably squeeze another 5-10% better performance out of it, but is it worth the money? That's your call.


You are going to be the one watching it, so if the picture pleases you the way it is, leave it be!


Good Luck!


JOHN
 

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Welcome to the forum, good questions and I would agree with John. No need to spend the money on a calibration.


If your interested in a good starting point to learn how to calibrate try picking up the Avia DVD or Video essentials DVD you can get both through Amazon at a discounted rate.


Have fun, great projector!


Cheers,


Requis
 

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I have had the 5700 for a few weeks now and feel that it needs very little tweaking. You may want to play with the contrast and brightness but I pretty much left all the settings at 50 after using Video Essentials. I did change the default gamma setting from film1 to film2 because the blacks looked better to me.


Other than that, this projector was ready to roll out of the box.


Time to sit back and enjoy....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the help. I will try the Film 2 setting tomorrow.


New question. The only 'glitch' I notice now is that when the screen is a solid light color then I can see heat waves in the top 10% of the picture. It literally loiosk like heat waves that come off the road. Does this mean I am not venting properly? Any tips/tricks to get rid of this?


Thanks,

Jeff
 

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You should have two feet clearance on both sides. Can you tell how it is installed. I know the X1 has the heat wave problem as it vents down front causing it to wave over the lens. I have been much impressed with the cooling system of the 5700 - I never notice the lens getting hot at all.


I am finding that Infocus is very tight tolerances for getting 6500K, but D65 is a much looser tolerance. Without explaining the color science D65 is a point on both the black body curve and 6500K isothermal line. Unlike most projectors that just turn the RGB contrast down to reach 6500K from 9000K - Infocus designs theirs to have optimum contrast out of the box at 6500K


I think the solution is you need to stop watching your store bought TV's for a while and only watch film on the projector. Give yourself two weeks - your brain has adapted to the blue green torch mode of CircuitShack TV's - takes a while to adapt back to natural color. Soon your caveman facial recognition instincts will return and cringe at the martians appearing on your old TV. (that is when you call the ISF calibrator - not to fix your projector that is within 10% but to get your TV fixed which is off 1000 percent!)


Some installers get lazy and say that is what the frame is for to absorb the picture. It is hard work to get it aligned just right - if you paid money insist they fix it. Sure you can fix it yourself - but you want to educate your installer to do a better job. You do this by adjusting the mount - do not using digital keystone controls. You paid for high resolution - do not defeat it by throwing some pixels away on the screen sides or digitally eaten.
 

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I second the film2 gamma choice - I originally promoted film 1. But I think that gamma is 2.7-2.8 which is maybe to dark for most people tastes. film2 is more around 2.4 which is what people are used to with CRT.


Certainly pick up the Sound&Vision or AVIA test DVD. You will not be able to fine tune any color temperature, but you will want to fiddle with the contrast, brightness, hue, color, controls. This is not because these inputs are miscalibrated - rather it is because all analog outputs are not made equal as with digital (even that is sometimes wrong). Highly unlikely that the cheap chinese DVD players out there will scope properly on NTSC waveform monitor! You need to adjust your projector to match your analog source. ISF calibration includes this - but you can do OK yourself if you get a test disk.


The trick with brightness (black level) is not to look at the moving black bars in AVIA as they tell you. Instead look very close at the black background and fiddle with the control until you stop seeing the dark greenish mosquitoe swarms. This will go a long way to satisfaction with DLP black and maximize your contrast range, at least until the HD2+ chips are out and you want to upgrade (sure your dealer will want to do business with you again!)
 

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Count me in as another film2 fan. I used DVE to calibrate my 5700. Only minor changes were needed but the picture improved a bit. Probably not worth the effort but still a bit better than out of the box. Zoom and focus are incredibly easy to use on this machine. I can't see the value in paying for a professional calibration. Save your cash and buy some DVD's that will look awesome on this PJ.
 
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