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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The sanding and priming principles should stand true for painting a guitar body, no?


I got all the paint and primer off the guitar with a belt sander, and sanded it with 60grit until it was reeeeeeal smooth - got rid of most of the ridges and uneven-ness that resulted from an only semi-experienced use of a belt sander. However, it's not completely gone - will priming with multiple coats (KILZ original oil-based spray) and sanding remove them? I would image they would at least be minimized...


Also, should I sand between coats of primer, or after several coats, or when the entire priming job is done, and with what grit?


Thanks guys
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsabo /forum/post/14164700


The sanding and priming principles should stand true for painting a guitar body, no?


I got all the paint and primer off the guitar with a belt sander, and sanded it with 60grit until it was reeeeeeal smooth - got rid of most of the ridges and uneven-ness that resulted from an only semi-experienced use of a belt sander. However, it's not completely gone - will priming with multiple coats (KILZ original oil-based spray) and sanding remove them? I would image they would at least be minimized...


Also, should I sand between coats of primer, or after several coats, or when the entire priming job is done, and with what grit?


Thanks guys

Since no one else has replied, I will give you my two cents. If you can see any scratches, ridges, rough spots, etc. BEFORE you apply the primer, it is my experience that you will see them later! Primer and paint will not hide any shortcomings in surface preparation. In fact, high gloss finishes will actually accentuate them. Low gloss finishes may not affect their visibility significantly but it won't eliminate them.


I would strongly recommend that you continue hand sanding with finer and finer grit sand paper until you are using 220 grit paper (at least). Your surface before applying any primer or finish should be like the proverbial 'baby's a**'! You should lightly sand between all applications of finish materials with a very fine sanding paper. I prefer 600 grit for this and use wet sanding to get the smoothest and best looking finish.
 

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Hi paulsabo.


My guess is this thread won't stay here long since it has nothing to do with DIY Screens, but is a guitar question.



May I suggest going to Justinguitar.com and posting this question in the "Equipment" forum. There are other good guitar forums, but this is the one I am familiar with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I'm expecting this thread to be gone in not too long - thanks for the help, and the guitar I started with, the wood, was really low quality, so I'm not expecting miracles or anything. Just a first project to learn on - might build a Les Paul or something later on in the summer. On to justinguitar!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsabo /forum/post/14164700


The sanding and priming principles should stand true for painting a guitar body, no?


I got all the paint and primer off the guitar with a belt sander, and sanded it with 60grit until it was reeeeeeal smooth - got rid of most of the ridges and uneven-ness that resulted from an only semi-experienced use of a belt sander. However, it's not completely gone - will priming with multiple coats (KILZ original oil-based spray) and sanding remove them? I would image they would at least be minimized...


Also, should I sand between coats of primer, or after several coats, or when the entire priming job is done, and with what grit?


Thanks guys

Well...the first red flag was the belt sander, but that's water under the bridge now.

Assuming it's wood, nothing beats layer upon layer of lacquer with fine sanding between coats ( I prefer 200 grit). A known short cut is poly urethane. Drys hard as nails with a deep luster finish. No buffing required between coats.


now, about that screen...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Heh, I didn't end it with 60grit, I went up to 150. It felt real smooth to the touch at that point anyway. Anyway, After sanding down the primer with 220grit, I like the way this is turning out. May warrant a second project later in the summer
Thanks for all the replies.
 
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