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Updated: 7 May 2012

Please download the Word document below.


The Audyssey Setup Guide is a collaborative effort, so if you see anything that needs to be changed or updated, let me know.


Mark


Notes on attached files

The "Audyssey Setup Guide..." is what probably brought you to this post in the first place.



The "Audyssey DSX Guidance" document consolidates items discussed in the Official Audyssey Thread regarding certain aspects of the Audyssey DSX technology.


The "Audyssey DSX Surround Speaker Placement Theory" document is a discussion concerning Audyssey's recommended surround speaker placement when utilizing Audyssey DSX.


The "Optimizing Surround Speaker Distance Adjustments" document details a procedure to optimize surround speaker distance settings.


The "Subwoofer Distance Tweak Instructions" document details a procedure to optimize the subwoofer / satellite speaker frequency response blend in the crossover region. Please note this procedure requires acoustic measurement tools and software.

 

The "Subwoofer Distance Tweak Instructions & Examples" document  includes the instructions in the document above, as well as numerous forum posts with example graphs.

 

 

Audyssey Setup Guide (2012-05-07).doc 169k . file

 

 

 

 

 

Audyssey DSX Guidance.doc 45.5k . file

 

 

 

 

 

Audyssey DSX Surround Speaker Placement Theory.doc 243k . file

 

 

 

 

 

Optimizing Surround Speaker Distance Adjustments.doc 91.5k . file

 

 

 

 

Subwoofer Distance Tweak Instructions (Requires Acoustic Measurement Tools).doc 47.5k . file

 

 

 

 

Subwoofer Distance Tweak Instructions & Examples (Requires Acoustic Measurement Tools).doc 1,688k .doc file
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Indy /forum/post/14456771


Gotcha, I'll run audyssey again and see how it sounds after a few days as I do believe my hearing thus far has been skewed due to not actually having good speakers before (only HTIB until now), not having ever properly calibrated before, and having speaker levels turned way up and out of sync with one another. One last thing, I won't touch the level calibration done to the subwoofer by audyssey but you are saying not to touch the actual volume knob that is on the sub either? I figured if I wasn't happy with the bass output I could try turning the gain up and to see if it helped. I keep reading that listening at reference level will/can damage your hearing is this true? I have been listening to my reciever at volume -24db to -27db before audyssey corrections so after it lowers all my speakers levels like it does to -10db or so I would need to turn the volume to -14db to equal the volume I was listening at before?

It's not a "volume knob" on the sub, it's a gain control that enables you to match levels with the other speakers. With an AV receiver, the receiver matches the levels with the other speakers with it's settings so the idea is to let the receiver match the levels and not touch the sub's gain control after the setup. The level settings for the other speakers are gain controls too. The setup process determines what gain level is appropriate for each speaker in order for a signal of the same strength sent to each speaker to result in you hearing a sound at the same level from each speaker at the primary listening position. The volume of the sub is controlled by the receiver's volume knob, as is the volume of the other speakers. Differences in level of sound from different speakers occur when the signal for the channels in the soundtrack are different and that's a deliberate part of the soundtrack.


Turning up the gain on the sub is tricky. If you have things set so the sub is only handling sound from the LFE channel then you're changing the balance of 1 channel relative to the rest of the channels. If the sub is also handling low frequencies for the other channels, you're also changing the frequency balance within each other channel by changing the level of bass frequencies below the crossover relative to the frequencies above the crossover.


In many ways you're better off changing the level of bass by using the receiver's tone controls and playing with the bass control. It will operate across a wider range which can be a problem, but it has more effect at lower frequencies and drops off as frequency increases so its effect tends to blend into the overall sound relatively smoothly, and you change all channels equally which is a plus. The drawback is that the effect of the bass tone control may extend a little higher in frequency than you like. A lot depends on how its effect is tapered but if you're going to play around a bit, that's where I'd start since its effect will be uniform across all channels. If you start playing with the sub setting not only do you not get that tapering off effect on the boost as the frequency rises but the effect on different channels will vary if the crossover frequencies for the speakers are different.


Listening at reference level MAY damage hearing but it may not. Setting the volume knob to 0 dB does not really determine how loud things are going to be, that's determined by the level of the signal in the soundtrack and it's constantly changing through a movie. Hearing protection standards are based on the average level of sound to which you're exposed and you need a meter which actually averages the levels if you want to measure it since the decibel scale is logarithmic which means you can't do a simple arithmetic averaging. Setting the receiver to reference level can produce peaks of around 105 dB or a bit more and continuous sound at that level will certainly cause hearing damage but not every movie has a soundtrack that is going to reach that level if you set the volume knob to 0 dB. Some movies are louder than others and even if the peaks reach 105 dB, the average sound pressure level is going to be considerably lower. It's that average level that is important and most safety standards are based on a maximum unprotected exposure at an average of 85 dBA (A weighting scale) for 8 hours per day. This equates to an average of 88 dBA for 4 hours, 91 dBA for 2 hours, and so on. For each increase of 3 dBA, you halve the permissable exposure level so the recommended exposure limit to an average of 105 dBA in a day would be around 4 minutes. You could have a couple of 105 dBA peaks in a movie with an average level of 85 dBA and you could watch that movie for 8 hours based on the recommended exposure levels but if the movie had an average level of 88 dBA you could only watch it for 4 hours based on those recommendations. Most movies are around 2 hours in duration and provided the movie is the loudest thing you listen to all day, average levels of 91 dBA would be OK based on the recommendations. Peak levels are often 15-20 dB louder than average levels so that gives a rough indication that reference level is not necessarily a problem as far as hearing protection goes. It also needs to be stated that those recommendations are based on exposure 5 days a week over long periods and most people aren't going to watch a movie that pushes their exposure to the limits 5 days a week.


To my mind, the biggest problem with reference level is that the peak levels it delivers really require large rooms in order to sound reasonable, rooms like a theatre setting. In the average living room those kind of peak levels can really be quite overpowering, plus they'll tend to rattle too many things, and I don't think I've ever watched anything with my volume at reference level. Around -5 dB is about the highest I go and I have the volume control set a lot lower for many things, especially TV where volume levels often seem to be more consistent so there's less variation between peak and average levels.


Don't worry about trying to match listening levels with Audyssey to the levels you used prior to Audyssey. Simply set the level at an enjoyable level and that may vary a bit from movie to movie. You may be quite happy turning up the volume on a quiet movie and turning it down a bit from there for an action movie with a lot of loud sound effects. As a basic rule of thumb you want to have things loud enough so that you can hear and understand dialogue clearly as a minimum and perhaps a bit louder than that for fun with some of the bangs. You can always turn on night mode or its equivalent if the level that works for dialogue results in bangs that are too loud. Night mode is a dynamic compression which raises the levels of the softer parts of the soundtrack while lowering the levels of the loudest parts. It can let you get the dialogue at an acceptable level while reducing the loudness of the bangs somewhat.
 

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Ok, I'm having a tough time getting my new Denon 1909 set up to my satisfaction. Basically, the front L/R and surrounds are all perfect, nice and loud during movies and games, but the center channel is just way too low.


I've following the instructions for running Audyssey posted here, but I'm wondering if there's something I need to check. I also worry that it might be simple speaker placement, as my center is below my plasma on a shelf, so it's lower down than the rest of the speakers.


Should I go into Manual Setup and bump up the center a couple of notches? Open to suggestions here, I'm a total Audyssey newb.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diseasedyak /forum/post/14457499


Ok, I'm having a tough time getting my new Denon 1909 set up to my satisfaction. Basically, the front L/R and surrounds are all perfect, nice and loud during movies and games, but the center channel is just way too low.


I've following the instructions for running Audyssey posted here, but I'm wondering if there's something I need to check. I also worry that it might be simple speaker placement, as my center is below my plasma on a shelf, so it's lower down than the rest of the speakers.


Should I go into Manual Setup and bump up the center a couple of notches? Open to suggestions here, I'm a total Audyssey newb.

Try aiming the center speaker up towards where the ears of the listeners will be. And where the setup mic is. In fact, this is where it should aim anyway.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by audyssey /forum/post/14454312


Do you have a push-pull type subwoofer by any chance? I have seen this happen with these types of subs and we believe it is due to the way the phasing of the two drivers interacts. I don't have a full explanation for it yet.


Chris

It's a (now 8 years old) Velodyne servo, so perhaps yes?


eric
 

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Chris,


The Denon feature lists for the 3808 CI and higher upper models say "Audyssey Dynamic EQ calibration installer ready", while for the 2809CI it says "Audyssey Dynamic EQ automatic tonal balance adjustment system".


Does this mean D EQ can be activated by the user?


If so, is any ecompared to doing it w/Pro setup?


Since it's a broadband correction is it correct to assume that less effectiveness is lost from not having Pro calibration compared to the room correction?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by noah katz /forum/post/14459014


Chris,


The Denon feature lists for the 3808 CI and higher upper models say "Audyssey Dynamic EQ calibration installer ready", while for the 2809CI it says "Audyssey Dynamic EQ automatic tonal balance adjustment system".


Does this mean D EQ can be activated by the user?


If so, is any ecompared to doing it w/Pro setup?


Since it's a broadband correction is it correct to assume that less effectiveness is lost from not having Pro calibration compared to the room correction?

Hi Noah,


Yes, Dynamic EQ is user activated on all new models. It will be user activated on the 3808CI as soon as the Denon firmware upgrade becomes available. That upgrade will include Dynamic Volume that is already included in all the 09 Denon models.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricBergan /forum/post/14458549


It's a (now 8 years old) Velodyne servo, so perhaps yes?


eric

I haven't seen shorter distances being reported for Velodyne subs. I recommend just setting it to the physical distance and using the LFE input on the Velodyne to bypass internal filters.


Chris
 

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Setup my Denon 1909 last night. Overall very happy w/ the sound. I am coming from an Onkyo TXSR 600 that is probably 6 years old or so. I am using a Polk RM6600 sub/sat system that is also 6 or 7 years old. I had previously connected the Polk subwoofer using Polk's recommended speaker level inputs (basically run the AVR outputs for FL and FR to the SW and then connect the FL and FR to the SW and tell the system you have Large fronts and no SW). Apparently the recommended crossover for these sats is 150Hz and since many receivers didn't let you set the crossover that high back 6 years ago Polk suggested you use their method.


For the Denon I got a SW cable and connected it to the Polk SW's (PSW 350) unfiltered LFE input. Set the volume knob on the SW to 12:00 and ran Audyssey. Fortunately Audyssey came back with crossover points of 150 Hz for the fronts and center and 120 Hz for the surrounds so I think it nailed it (was a little worried it would come back w/ a low crossover). However the LFE crossover (in Manual Setup / Speaker Setup / Crossover Freq) is at 80 Hz - do I want to change this?


Also I have noticed that the bass seems to be much more present than it was before. It is very possible my system was not set up properly before (not even sure where the LFE knob on the SW was set) but now if I am in another room I can hear some rumbling of the SW every now and then when just watching regular TV (the Olympics earlier today for example). I know you don't want to mess around w/ the SW volume knob after running Audyssey but wondering if the bass I am hearing is normal and if it isn't how I adjust for it? Do I need to change some settings and then re-run Auto Setup?


Messed around w/ Dynamic Volume and I think I like the Evening setting the best. Daytime doesn't seem to do enough and Midnight muffles the sound too much. So I am basically leaving Evening on for all of my inputs.


Thanks in advance
 

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Well, I've officially retired Audyssey - Jeff Meier (UMR here on AVS) came by to calibrate my Epson Pro Cinema 1080UB, and thought the sound of my system was subpar (and without recounting too much here, I've done probably a dozen calibrations with my Onkyo 905, being quite careful and following the best practices of this forum.


Jeff has some pretty sophisticated audio test equipment, and found that one of my speakers (the center) was out of phase - an internal wiring issue that he noted is a bit more common than in should be. We fixed that, and then he spent an hour running various tests, tweaking the manual EQ and crossovers, and channel levels, and working quite a bit with my SMS-1 (I patted myself on the back to the extent that he said my sub settings were the best he's seen/heard in any setup he's walked into.) But that was improved as well.


All in all the sound is much better integrated, has much more punch, and is focused much better and with greater clarity than before.
 

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Great, thanks, Chris.


Is there a minimum firmware version of the 2808 that will ensure that it has it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by audyssey /forum/post/14459094


Hi Noah,


Yes, Dynamic EQ is user activated on all new models. It will be user activated on the 3808CI as soon as the Denon firmware upgrade becomes available. That upgrade will include Dynamic Volume that is already included in all the 09 Denon models.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by noah katz /forum/post/14459634


Great, thanks, Chris.


Is there a minimum firmware version of the 2808 that will ensure that it has it?

Hi Noah,


I assume you mean the 2809, right? There is no minimum version. They all ship with Dynamic EQ that turns on right after you run MultEQ.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricScott /forum/post/14459300


For the Denon I got a SW cable and connected it to the Polk SW's (PSW 350) unfiltered LFE input. Set the volume knob on the SW to 12:00 and ran Audyssey. Fortunately Audyssey came back with crossover points of 150 Hz for the fronts and center and 120 Hz for the surrounds so I think it nailed it (was a little worried it would come back w/ a low crossover). However the LFE crossover (in Manual Setup / Speaker Setup / Crossover Freq) is at 80 Hz - do I want to change this?

The LFE setting that you see is not a crossover. It is a filter that is only applied to the separate LFE track on DVDs and HD content. It doesn't have any effect on the content that is sent to your main channels. In any case, the LFE filter should always be set to 120 Hz. It should not be a variable setting available for tweaking, but manufacturers haven't figured that out yet...

Quote:
Also I have noticed that the bass seems to be much more present than it was before. It is very possible my system was not set up properly before (not even sure where the LFE knob on the SW was set) but now if I am in another room I can hear some rumbling of the SW every now and then when just watching regular TV (the Olympics earlier today for example). I know you don't want to mess around w/ the SW volume knob after running Audyssey but wondering if the bass I am hearing is normal and if it isn't how I adjust for it? Do I need to change some settings and then re-run Auto Setup?

Welcome to the world of TV production. Let's just say it is standards... challenged. They don't typically monitor with a subwoofer and bass management in the control room. So, all kinds of bass creeps into the mix and they never hear it. Very sad. The same is true for many commercials.


Listen to some movies before deciding that the bass is wrong. You can manually change it, but do so in the subwoofer level trim within the Denon menu so that you can always put it back if you need to.

Quote:
Messed around w/ Dynamic Volume and I think I like the Evening setting the best. Daytime doesn't seem to do enough and Midnight muffles the sound too much. So I am basically leaving Evening on for all of my inputs.

This is purely a personal choice that depends on the circumstances (isolation of your listening room, people sleeping next door, etc.). You may find that you need to change it at different times.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by audyssey /forum/post/14459800


The LFE setting that you see is not a crossover. It is a filter that is only applied to the separate LFE track on DVDs and HD content. It doesn't have any effect on the content that is sent to your main channels. In any case, the LFE filter should always be set to 120 Hz. It should not be a variable setting available for tweaking, but manufacturers haven't figured that out yet...




Welcome to the world of TV production. Let's just say it is standards... challenged. They don't typically monitor with a subwoofer and bass management in the control room. So, all kinds of bass creeps into the mix and they never hear it. Very sad. The same is true for many commercials.


Listen to some movies before deciding that the bass is wrong. You can manually change it, but do so in the subwoofer level trim within the Denon menu so that you can always put it back if you need to.




This is purely a personal choice that depends on the circumstances (isolation of your listening room, people sleeping next door, etc.). You may find that you need to change it at different times.


Chris

Thanks Chris!


I assume changing the LFE from 80hz to 120hz won't mess up the Audyssey calibration?


Definitely going to give it some time and watch some movies before changing anything around. Unfortunately my wife (who made fun of me for setting up a tripod to run the Audyssey setup) commented that she heard the bass and didn't like it (we have a 4 month old so she is very sensitive to his sleep habits). So I may need to do something about it but hopefully she will get used to it.


Thanks again.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricScott /forum/post/14459882


Thanks Chris!


I assume changing the LFE from 80hz to 120hz won't mess up the Audyssey calibration?

It will not. MultEQ doesn't even look at that setting.

Quote:
Definitely going to give it some time and watch some movies before changing anything around. Unfortunately my wife (who made fun of me for setting up a tripod to run the Audyssey setup) commented that she heard the bass and didn't like it (we have a 4 month old so she is very sensitive to his sleep habits). So I may need to do something about it but hopefully she will get used to it.

You may have to turn it down for some TV content and back up to the standard value for DVDs and HD movies. That's why it's best to do that in the Denon menu. Easy to change to exactly the same value.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thrang /forum/post/14459617


Well, I've officially retired Audyssey - Jeff Meier (UMR here on AVS) came by to calibrate my Epson Pro Cinema 1080UB, and thought the sound of my system was subpar (and without recounting too much here, I've done probably a dozen calibrations with my Onkyo 905, being quite careful and following the best practices of this forum.


Jeff has some pretty sophisticated audio test equipment, and found that one of my speakers (the center) was out of phase - an internal wiring issue that he noted is a bit more common than in should be. We fixed that, and then he spent an hour running various tests, tweaking the manual EQ and crossovers, and channel levels, and working quite a bit with my SMS-1 (I patted myself on the back to the extent that he said my sub settings were the best he's seen/heard in any setup he's walked into.) But that was improved as well.


All in all the sound is much better integrated, has much more punch, and is focused much better and with greater clarity than before.


All you are saying is you do not prefer a flat frequency response with a slight roll off at the top to get the same sound as the mixing studio because that is what you got with Audyssey EQ assuming you calibrated correctly.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by audyssey /forum/post/14459918


You may have to turn it down for some TV content and back up to the standard value for DVDs and HD movies. That's why it's best to do that in the Denon menu. Easy to change to exactly the same value.


Chris

He has the Denon 1909. Should not Dynamic Volume EQ set on Midnight keep the baby happy?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary J /forum/post/14459955


He has the Denon 1909. Should not Dynamic Volume EQ set on Midnight keep the baby happy?

This is purely a personal preference. So, we recommend to go with the setting that each person finds appropriate at the time they are listening. I find that I use different settings depending on which room I am in and what is happening next door.


Chris
 

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As I did not get a response last time I am posting again.


Hi All,


While watching TV if someone is sitting on the couch I sit on the carpet (i.e. floor) in front of the couch. Now the question, if I take measurements at ear level in the sitting position on the couch and measurements while sitting on the floor will audyssey make appropriate corrections even though the ear level is different for the floor and couch.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thrang /forum/post/14459617


Well, I've officially retired Audyssey - Jeff Meier (UMR here on AVS) came by to calibrate my Epson Pro Cinema 1080UB, and thought the sound of my system was subpar (and without recounting too much here, I've done probably a dozen calibrations with my Onkyo 905, being quite careful and following the best practices of this forum.


Jeff has some pretty sophisticated audio test equipment, and found that one of my speakers (the center) was out of phase - an internal wiring issue that he noted is a bit more common than in should be. We fixed that, and then he spent an hour running various tests, tweaking the manual EQ and crossovers, and channel levels, and working quite a bit with my SMS-1 (I patted myself on the back to the extent that he said my sub settings were the best he's seen/heard in any setup he's walked into.) But that was improved as well.


All in all the sound is much better integrated, has much more punch, and is focused much better and with greater clarity than before.

This is the second anti-Audyssey/pro-Jeff Meier post I've seen here and I have to wonder why? And your last post here, thrang, was three months ago about the Penguins and the Rangers. The previous post was two months before that, so it's not like you're a regular. As far as I'm concerned, you are off-topic with your shameless plug. And I apologize to the thread for being off-topic as well, but I felt this needed to be posted.
 
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