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I'm not that well versed in the subject but wouldn't the uncertainty of the panel and the uncertainty of the i1 be compounded making it even less likely to match your specific panel?
I'm discussing on another non-P-Series-specific thread, and it seems as though profiling to the specific LEDs used in the backlight of a specific LED/LCD TV is more important than either panel/BLUE-to-panel/BLU variation or i1DisplayPro-to-i1DisplayPro variation (including drift over time).

Do you have a spectro (or have access to someone that does)?

Eventually, I'll probably purchase a used spectro or rent one, but this seems like an easy way to get some incremental improvement in accuracy versus using the preset 'white LED/LCD' profile in HCFR.
 

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Discussion Starter #602
I'm discussing on another non-P-Series-specific thread, and it seems as though profiling to the specific LEDs used in the backlight of a specific LED/LCD TV is more important than either panel/BLUE-to-panel/BLU variation or i1DisplayPro-to-i1DisplayPro variation (including drift over time).

Do you have a spectro (or have access to someone that does)?

Eventually, I'll probably purchase a used spectro or rent one, but this seems like an easy way to get some incremental improvement in accuracy versus using the preset 'white LED/LCD' profile in HCFR.
I do not but I did have a side conversation with buzzard about this and deemed it too expensive for my budget haha. I would be interested in the same numbers though if it does improve the accuracy even a little bit. I'm also confused about the SG color patterns but once the update gets sent out I'll be back asking questions as I should have more time to really sit down and tinker.
 

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I believe my SpectraCal C6 is essentially a rebranded DisplayPro (with its own 'enhanced' tables that I don't even take advantage of since I profile it to my EyeOne Pro whenever I calibrate anyway :p). I'll look into profiling it on my P70 in ColorHCFR so I can share a correction table for you guys. :)
 

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I'm not ready to invest in a spectro yet, but if there is a way that a P70-specific profile of the i1DisplayPro can more accurately calibrate my i1DisplayPro to my P70 than it comes out of the box (and using the 'white LED/LCD' setting in HCFR), I could be interested in giving that a try.
Hi, VIZIO currently don't have any sellers authorized to sell VIZIO products in European market, so I haven't seen or measured any of them.

The best option for you is to hire a professional that will come to your city to visit other customer for a full calibration to visit you and create a meter correction table for you only. This will take only a few minutes and the price for that service will be lower from a full calibration fee.
 

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Discussion Starter #605
Hi, VIZIO currently don't have any sellers authorized to sell VIZIO products in European market, so I haven't seen or measured any of them.

The best option for you is to hire a professional that will come to your city to visit other customer for a full calibration to visit you and create a meter correction table for you only. This will take only a few minutes and the price for that service will be lower from a full calibration fee.
I have considered this option for myself however I am currently finishing up my doctorate at Mississippi state university and in Starkville MS there are exactly zero options for professional calibration which led me to begin the journey myself.
 

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I believe my SpectraCal C6 is essentially a rebranded DisplayPro (with its own 'enhanced' tables that I don't even take advantage of since I profile it to my EyeOne Pro whenever I calibrate anyway :p). I'll look into profiling it on my P70 in ColorHCFR so I can share a correction table for you guys. :)
Yeah, the C6 is supposed to be the same meter as the i1DisplayPro so an HCFR profile for the P70 done with a C6 should be usable by an i1DisplayPro. Will appreciate that calibration table if/when you can get around to it (as well as any pointers as to how to use it with HCFR :)

Waiting for this 1.1.11 FW is getting old...
 

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Hi, VIZIO currently don't have any sellers authorized to sell VIZIO products in European market, so I haven't seen or measured any of them.

The best option for you is to hire a professional that will come to your city to visit other customer for a full calibration to visit you and create a meter correction table for you only. This will take only a few minutes and the price for that service will be lower from a full calibration fee.
What is the % difference between having a meter profiled on your own personal display versus on someone else's display of the same type?

If there was ever a professional calibrator calibrating a P70 in the Bay Area and offering to profile i1DisplayPro meters 'on the side' (and on site), that might interest me, but otherwise it seems like there are rental places or used spectros for sale that might be more cost-effective than paying to have a dedicated on-site profile done.

Any idea what someone would charge to come to your home and do a profile of your i1DisplayPro on your specific TV?
 

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Yeah, the C6 is supposed to be the same meter as the i1DisplayPro so an HCFR profile for the P70 done with a C6 should be usable by an i1DisplayPro. Will appreciate that calibration table if/when you can get around to it (as well as any pointers as to how to use it with HCFR :)

Waiting for this 1.1.11 FW is getting old...
Here you go... I think the way to use this is to drop this file (extracted from the zip of course) in the Etalon_Argyll directory of HCFR, then go and reselect your sensor when setting up a calibration document. If that's right, then it'll show up as a meter correction matrix you can select for your i1DisplayPro on the sensor selection dialog. It definitely appears to be valid for my specific meters on my display, at least, since the matrix values are extremely close to those generated when I do a meter profiling for this combo in CalMAN. :)
 

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Here you go... I think the way to use this is to drop this file (extracted from the zip of course) in the Etalon_Argyll directory of HCFR, then go and reselect your sensor when setting up a calibration document. If that's right, then it'll show up as a meter correction matrix you can select for your i1DisplayPro on the sensor selection dialog. It definitely appears to be valid for my specific meters on my display, at least, since the matrix values are extremely close to those generated when I do a meter profiling for this combo in CalMAN. :)
Thanks. Will probably await the new FW release before diving into this, but will definitely give it a try.

From the profile you have done, do you have any sense of how significantly your in-house profile changed your calibration versus what it would have been if you had just used the default 'white LED/LCD' profile from HCFR?

(The rabbit-hole just keeps going deeper, doesn't it 😊)
 

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What is the % difference between having a meter profiled on your own personal display versus on someone else's display of the same type?

If there was ever a professional calibrator calibrating a P70 in the Bay Area and offering to profile i1DisplayPro meters 'on the side' (and on site), that might interest me, but otherwise it seems like there are rental places or used spectros for sale that might be more cost-effective than paying to have a dedicated on-site profile done.
It's impossible to know for sure how will be the difference.

Think that there a lot of variations that can chang each display's spectral response, it has to do with the panel size, each size (55,65,85 etc) of panel may have different spectra, each manufactured month production line or each factory of production, or each panel manufactured for for EU or NA or JP or other region can be different. Differences can be small/larger but can be measured.

Using CCSS file from other users it's like playing lottery, because each id3 as a mass production low-cost meter, it's unknown how close any id3 instrument is to the CIE standard observer curves.

So if you use the same CCSS file to 3-4 id3, you will see differences that are introduced by the id3's unit-to-unit variations, since the meter (to keep the cost low) it's not coming any any certification of performance. It's unknown if you use the factory default CCSS that will be better from a user's CCSS file.

A 3x3 matrix meter correction table using your own display will get you better results. How close to reference has to do with what Spectro you will use for this job. A professional field calibrator with a 5nm spectro like Photoresearch/JETI can read better your display's response.

If you take 10x used or new i1pro1/2, they will not read the same...some of these i1pro will tend to green, others to red etc...

Think also that SpectraCAL was offering a special correction table for LED measurements for the i1PRO1/2 they were selling because the spikes of LED are a bit too narrow band to be characterized properly by the read bandwidth of the i1PRO1/2.

According to this site where they tested (using as a reference a PhotoReasearch PR-730 ~$30.000) 10 brand new i1PRO1's the unit-to-unit variation was mean 2.0 dE2000, max 3.5 dE2000 to using an LCD display.

i1PRO1/2 is not a reference meter... but it's a minimum recommended meter for any calibration to work to be used as a reference meter to create meter correction tables.

i1PRO has some limitations, since the 1931 2° CIE Standard Colorimetric Observer Data are provided from 380nm to 780nm and sampled at 5nm, i1PRO as we know has optical resolution of 10nm, and it's limited to 380-730 nm only.

i1PRO1/2 is good meters for their money but not reference or comparable to any 5nm spectro for display calibration. But there times that can read ultra close (0.3dE) so close to the measurements of a 5nm spectro but you will never know when, unless you have both meter to compare them to the same display.

i1PRO1/2 is manufactured mainly for printing industry that's why the NIST document that is coming with confirms that is accurate for Reflectance Mode, for papers, printed photos etc.... nowhere the proof of performance in Emissive Mode.



The NIST document has performed at X-Rite factory in China and the NIST document that a new meter is coming with is a certificate of performance by taking some reflectance measurements using some Ceramic BCRA Calibration Tiles @ D50, 2°.

That NIST document it's not guarantee to you the performance of the i1PRO2 in emissive mode (for displays) and also X-Rite is not giving any other information about if or how they are testing the meter at emmisive mode, you have only certification that is valid for measuring reflective light (printing/paper industry).

Here is an example of the Spectral Response Resolution of i1PRO vs. JETI 1211 measuring a Pioneer KURO.



Here is an example of the Spectral Response Resolution of i1PRO vs. JETI 1211 measuring a Panasonic Plasma.



Here is an example of the Spectral Response Resolution of i1PRO vs. JETI 1211 measuring Direct LED Display.



The i1PRO1/2 splits the light into 10 nanometer increments, whats why you see a few steps on i1pro reading, it can't catch well the whole spectral spikes because of its limited optical resolution.

To provide an accurate measurement of a display which has a complex spectral output such as an LCD/LED,DLP/Laser (like Mitsubishi Laservue RPTV) etc. you must have a bandwidth of 5.0 nm per pixel.

When you will use an spectro which provides less bandwidth (10nm/pixel for i1PRO1/2 for example) the measurung data will contain included errors as spectral peaks which lie closer together then the 10nm specification will be seen by the instrument as one peak. When these spectral data are converted to XYZ and then to xyY data the color errors will be there...

That's why the best solution is to hire a PRO with a JETI/Photo Research/Colorimetry Research spectro to create some meter correction tables for your colorimeter, not to calibrate your display, only to run some profilings to all your displays you may have there.

This is the best for value for money way to calibrate your specific display. The problem is that you can't find a pro calibrator with 5nm spectro the time you need it or so easy to a lot of countries or areas around the world, for these users the purchase or the i1PRO1/2 meter will remain the best choice to profile their colorimeters.

Any idea what someone would charge to come to your home and do a profile of your i1DisplayPro on your specific TV?
You can ask that question to this thread: ISF Calibrators, where are you located? Please post here!
 

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It's impossible to know for sure how will be the difference.

Think that there a lot of variations that can chang each display's spectral response, it has to do with the panel size, each size (55,65,85 etc) of panel may have different spectra, each manufactured month production line or each factory of production, or each panel manufactured for for EU or NA or JP or other region can be different. Differences can be small/larger but can be measured.

Using CCSS file from other users it's like playing lottery, because each id3 as a mass production low-cost meter, it's unknown how close any id3 instrument is to the CIE standard observer curves.

So if you use the same CCSS file to 3-4 id3, you will see differences that are introduced by the id3's unit-to-unit variations, since the meter (to keep the cost low) it's not coming any any certification of performance. It's unknown if you use the factory default CCSS that will be better from a user's CCSS file.

A 3x3 matrix meter correction table using your own display will get you better results. How close to reference has to do with what Spectro you will use for this job. A professional field calibrator with a 5nm spectro like Photoresearch/JETI can read better your display's response.

If you take 10x used or new i1pro1/2, they will not read the same...some of these i1pro will tend to green, others to red etc...

Think also that SpectraCAL was offering a special correction table for LED measurements for the i1PRO1/2 they were selling because the spikes of LED are a bit too narrow band to be characterized properly by the read bandwidth of the i1PRO1/2.

According to this site where they tested (using as a reference a PhotoReasearch PR-730 ~$30.000) 10 brand new i1PRO1's the unit-to-unit variation was mean 2.0 dE2000, max 3.5 dE2000 to using an LCD display.

i1PRO1/2 is not a reference meter... but it's a minimum recommended meter for any calibration to work to be used as a reference meter to create meter correction tables.

i1PRO has some limitations, since the 1931 2° CIE Standard Colorimetric Observer Data are provided from 380nm to 780nm and sampled at 5nm, i1PRO as we know has optical resolution of 10nm, and it's limited to 380-730 nm only.

i1PRO1/2 is good meters for their money but not reference or comparable to any 5nm spectro for display calibration. But there times that can read ultra close (0.3dE) so close to the measurements of a 5nm spectro but you will never know when, unless you have both meter to compare them to the same display.

i1PRO1/2 is manufactured mainly for printing industry that's why the NIST document that is coming with confirms that is accurate for Reflectance Mode, for papers, printed photos etc.... nowhere the proof of performance in Emissive Mode.



The NIST document has performed at X-Rite factory in China and the NIST document that a new meter is coming with is a certificate of performance by taking some reflectance measurements using some Ceramic BCRA Calibration Tiles @ D50, 2°.

That NIST document it's not guarantee to you the performance of the i1PRO2 in emissive mode (for displays) and also X-Rite is not giving any other information about if or how they are testing the meter at emmisive mode, you have only certification that is valid for measuring reflective light (printing/paper industry).

Here is an example of the Spectral Response Resolution of i1PRO vs. JETI 1211 measuring a Pioneer KURO.



Here is an example of the Spectral Response Resolution of i1PRO vs. JETI 1211 measuring a Panasonic Plasma.



Here is an example of the Spectral Response Resolution of i1PRO vs. JETI 1211 measuring Direct LED Display.



The i1PRO1/2 splits the light into 10 nanometer increments, whats why you see a few steps on i1pro reading, it can't catch well the whole spectral spikes because of its limited optical resolution.

To provide an accurate measurement of a display which has a complex spectral output such as an LCD/LED,DLP/Laser (like Mitsubishi Laservue RPTV) etc. you must have a bandwidth of 5.0 nm per pixel.

When you will use an spectro which provides less bandwidth (10nm/pixel for i1PRO1/2 for example) the measurung data will contain included errors as spectral peaks which lie closer together then the 10nm specification will be seen by the instrument as one peak. When these spectral data are converted to XYZ and then to xyY data the color errors will be there...

That's why the best solution is to hire a PRO with a JETI/Photo Research/Colorimetry Research spectro to create some meter correction tables for your colorimeter, not to calibrate your display, only to run some profilings to all your displays you may have there.

This is the best for value for money way to calibrate your specific display. The problem is that you can't find a pro calibrator with 5nm spectro the time you need it or so easy to a lot of countries or areas around the world, for these users the purchase or the i1PRO1/2 meter will remain the best choice to profile their colorimeters.



You can ask that question to this thread: ISF Calibrators, where are you located? Please post here!
Thanks for the thoughtful and through response, Ted. And thanks to the pictures you included, I believe I once and for all understand the difference between a high-quality reference spectro and the lower-end consumer spectros such as the i1Pro.

I've taken a first step with an i1DisplayPro that has allowed me to calibrate to much higher repeatability/precision but to a standard which is less accurate than reference (CIE2000?).

There are a slew of factors impacting the accuracy of my i1DisplayPro's inaccurate reference including:

A/ drift over time (let's shelve that one for now)
B/ manufacturing variation
C/ differences in the white LED light composition of the LEDs used in my specific P70 series of TVs (nominal) versus the 'white LED/LCD' default composition used by HCFR.
D/ additional manufacturing variation in the white light composition of my specific P70 TV compared to the nominal/average composition.

I understand that a professional profile of my specific i1DisplayPro profiled on my specific P70 would take care of all of these factors in one fell swoop and would be the 'best' way to improve the accuracy of my calibrations, but it will be some time before I can take that step.

In the meantime, I could be interested to take an intermediate step towards improving accuracy if it is relatively easy, involves modest cost, and will take a significant step towards improving accuracy (I would not bother with any of this for a 1% improvement).

To that end, I would greatly appreciate your opinion as to the ranking of the above factors (most significant sources of inaccuracy -> least significant sources of inaccuracy).

For a modest fee, an i1DisplayPro can be sent in to ChromaPure or elsewhere to be profiled. I assume that this takes care of B (as well as A, at least for a period).

Assuming a reference Spectro profiles a P70 for another recently-profiled i1DisplayPro, it seems like that ought to largely address C (assuming the correction needed for the P70 from 'white LED/LCD' HCFR default is of any significance).

And I suspect that D (manufacturing variance in the LEDs used in the backlight and color filters used on the LCD) is the least significant of these 4 factors and a source of inaccuracy that I will be willing to live with.

You've helped me to understand that if I get another P70 owners profile of their i1DisplayPro on their P70, I'll have the inaccuracy of their spectro (esp. If i1Pro) plus the manufacturing and drift variances between our 2 i1DisplayPros to contend with, so probably not a good idea unless the profile for the P70 is significantly different than the HCFR 'white LED/LCD' default.

Would really help me to know which of these 4 factors is likely to be most significant and whether there is a >>1% improvement in accuracy to be had at modest cost / expense as a next step...

Thanks again for the effort you have put into explaining.
 

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It is widely known that Ted is not a big fan of the I1 Pro.

I would argue for the enthusiast it is the only affordable spectroradiometer available and does indeed improve on the I1 Display 3 results.

Have a look at the following threads for more information:

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...-pro-d3-if-you-could-only-have-one-meter.html

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...-now-available-spectracal-4.html#post24433377

We all wish we could afford the $12,000 and up spectro but not many can.

Bottom line the I1 Pro is used by a lot of people with good result.
 

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It is widely known that Ted is not a big fan of the I1 Pro.

I would argue for the enthusiast it is the only affordable spectroradiometer available and does indeed improve on the I1 Display 3 results.

Have a look at the following threads for more information:

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...-pro-d3-if-you-could-only-have-one-meter.html

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...-now-available-spectracal-4.html#post24433377

We all wish we could afford the $12,000 and up spectro but not many can.

Bottom line the I1 Pro is used by a lot of people with good result.
Thanks for the link to that interesting thread. I will be interested in your results once you have profiled your i1DisplayPro to your P65 using your i1Pro -I realize the profile for the AUO-based P65 will be different than the profile for the Sharp-based P70, but I'm hoping the order of magnitude (and significance of profiling the i1DisplayPro for this class of FALD LED/LCDs) will be similar.
 

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Here you go... I think the way to use this is to drop this file (extracted from the zip of course) in the Etalon_Argyll directory of HCFR, then go and reselect your sensor when setting up a calibration document. If that's right, then it'll show up as a meter correction matrix you can select for your i1DisplayPro on the sensor selection dialog. It definitely appears to be valid for my specific meters on my display, at least, since the matrix values are extremely close to those generated when I do a meter profiling for this combo in CalMAN. :)
Thank you for this, I will give this a try when I get a chance to see how much different it is from White LED (as previously discussed I don't feel like white led is correct).


As a side note I've done extensive "fiddling" with settings and noticed a very strange anomaly. My red saturation seems to move. I've seen it twice so far. Optimal red saturation varied from 4-> 11. Both times it happened, it changed my white point balance as well (red was low). Interestingly the outside FULL red saturation point never moves (so I don't think it's the meter?). Both times it has happened I was messing with color (brought it to 0 and up to 100) as well as tint (went down to -10). Both times it happened the set and meter had been warmed up for well over 2 hours... I can't get it to repeat (turn all settings on/off, change inputs, a short 10second power cycle), and once it's clicked in I can't get it to be undone (haven't checked since long 3+hour power cycling).


Also I noticed that there seems to be a red internal push when turning on ALZ. I know you mentioned the blue push at 100% with ALZ, but watching the TVs internal test patterns the white ramp, you can very clearly see the blue and an extra red push in the 90%. This is not shown on reference material, only the TVs internal test.


This TVs red is driving me nuts. I love it with the exception of the Reds and fully saturated oranges. If I were to get another set (not Vizio) are there any suggestions for TVs -without- the fixed color gamut like the sharp panels? The samsungs are touted as having the most accurate colors... *sigh* I'm having so much trouble finding any information out there. I guess not a ton of people do calibrations.


It also bugs me that my 7 year old tv (with only 2 point white balance and color/tint not full CMS) has more accurate colors...
 

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Thank you for this, I will give this a try when I get a chance to see how much different it is from White LED (as previously discussed I don't feel like white led is correct).


As a side note I've done extensive "fiddling" with settings and noticed a very strange anomaly. My red saturation seems to move. I've seen it twice so far. Optimal red saturation varied from 4-> 11. Both times it happened, it changed my white point balance as well (red was low). Interestingly the outside FULL red saturation point never moves (so I don't think it's the meter?). Both times it has happened I was messing with color (brought it to 0 and up to 100) as well as tint (went down to -10). Both times it happened the set and meter had been warmed up for well over 2 hours... I can't get it to repeat (turn all settings on/off, change inputs, a short 10second power cycle), and once it's clicked in I can't get it to be undone (haven't checked since long 3+hour power cycling).


Also I noticed that there seems to be a red internal push when turning on ALZ. I know you mentioned the blue push at 100% with ALZ, but watching the TVs internal test patterns the white ramp, you can very clearly see the blue and an extra red push in the 90%. This is not shown on reference material, only the TVs internal test.


This TVs red is driving me nuts. I love it with the exception of the Reds and fully saturated oranges. If I were to get another set (not Vizio) are there any suggestions for TVs -without- the fixed color gamut like the sharp panels? The samsungs are touted as having the most accurate colors... *sigh* I'm having so much trouble finding any information out there. I guess not a ton of people do calibrations.


It also bugs me that my 7 year old tv (with only 2 point white balance and color/tint not full CMS) has more accurate colors...
You may already be a more experienced calibrator than me, but I thought I would pass on a few of the 'tricks' I developed while learning to calibrate my P70:

I keep ALZ ON throughout calibration (including 11-pt greyscale) to avoid exactly the kinds of color shifts you are describing. To avoid the backlight dimming at lower IRE, I keep the CMS open through readings. By using 1% box and checking black levels, you vp an confirm that the backlight maintains the same intensity from 100% IRE all the way down to 0% IRE.

Using the Rec.709 75%/75% standard instead of Rec.709 (which is 100%), you will get a more accurate calibration (as suggested by Buzz767 and others). You will need to use 75%/75% patterns to calibrate primaries and secondaries but then you can re-measure at Rec.709 and use 100% saturation sweeps to characterize the result.

Red 100% will be off but it rarely effects content and adjusting tint to taste when you see content with 'sunburned face' results in a pretty good result (again, as suggested by Buzz767).

I looked briefly at the TVs internal test patterns but found them to be inaccurate versus the GCD patterns played off of my Bluray player. Not knowing anything about how they are generated or how accurate they are, I would suggest to avoid them.

Please share your results using Googer's profile data - I may try the same thing once the new FW is released.
 

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You may already be a more experienced calibrator than me, but I thought I would pass on a few of the 'tricks' I developed while learning to calibrate my P70:

I keep ALZ ON throughout calibration (including 11-pt greyscale) to avoid exactly the kinds of color shifts you are describing. To avoid the backlight dimming at lower IRE, I keep the CMS open through readings. By using 1% box and checking black levels, you vp an confirm that the backlight maintains the same intensity from 100% IRE all the way down to 0% IRE.

Using the Rec.709 75%/75% standard instead of Rec.709 (which is 100%), you will get a more accurate calibration (as suggested by Buzz767 and others). You will need to use 75%/75% patterns to calibrate primaries and secondaries but then you can re-measure at Rec.709 and use 100% saturation sweeps to characterize the result.

Red 100% will be off but it rarely effects content and adjusting tint to taste when you see content with 'sunburned face' results in a pretty good result (again, as suggested by Buzz767).

I looked briefly at the TVs internal test patterns but found them to be inaccurate versus the GCD patterns played off of my Bluray player. Not knowing anything about how they are generated or how accurate they are, I would suggest to avoid them.

Please share your results using Googer's profile data - I may try the same thing once the new FW is released.

I was going back to tune for ALZ (had not done this) and I basically followed this.




Also, don't get me wrong, I can get the colors in FANTASTIC... with the exception of the oranges and fully saturated reds. The skins and everything look great (full color check of average dE of 1.53 - the big 500 point color checker). Regular content looks great...


Cartoons look awful. Elmo looks bad. Sesame street is almost unwatchable to me (not because it's sesame street, but because of the colors). Thankfully my daughter doesn't care that Elmo is the wrong shade of red, or that the Martian bopping up and down is very over saturated orange. Or that the lime green is off. But I see it, and it bugs me. My worries are not for regular content or watching or 90% of the movies out there.


Disney Pixar movies -> noticeably off when saturations are near 100. Note only near the 100%. I shouldn't be able to see it. I'm not expecting reference grade... but with a dE of 8... grumble. I know these (perhaps with the exception of elmo) are not in our color memory, but it has me questioning all of the reds I see on the screen. It also has me worried as more and more content comes out that we will be watching that are cartoons (young daughter). And cartoons love to have rich vibrant 100% saturated colors. I can probably learn to live with it, especially if I don't go from my old TV to the new one, or from friends to mine.


I was messing with the color and the tint to shrink 100% red/green points. I was successful, and got them "in line" then I went back to the CMS to adjust the saturations, but the reds poped back out to their "standard" spot when I got my saturations where they needed to be. So the effort was in vain. I don't suggest anyone mess with setting the color super low or the tint in fear of their red saturations moving.


I'll let you know how the profile data goes when I get a chance.
 

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I was going back to tune for ALZ (had not done this) and I basically followed this.




Also, don't get me wrong, I can get the colors in FANTASTIC... with the exception of the oranges and fully saturated reds. The skins and everything look great (full color check of average dE of 1.53 - the big 500 point color checker). Regular content looks great...


Cartoons look awful. Elmo looks bad. Sesame street is almost unwatchable to me (not because it's sesame street, but because of the colors). Thankfully my daughter doesn't care that Elmo is the wrong shade of red, or that the Martian bopping up and down is very over saturated orange. Or that the lime green is off. But I see it, and it bugs me. My worries are not for regular content or watching or 90% of the movies out there.


Disney Pixar movies -> noticeably off when saturations are near 100. Note only near the 100%. I shouldn't be able to see it. I'm not expecting reference grade... but with a dE of 8... grumble. I know these (perhaps with the exception of elmo) are not in our color memory, but it has me questioning all of the reds I see on the screen. It also has me worried as more and more content comes out that we will be watching that are cartoons (young daughter). And cartoons love to have rich vibrant 100% saturated colors. I can probably learn to live with it, especially if I don't go from my old TV to the new one, or from friends to mine.


I was messing with the color and the tint to shrink 100% red/green points. I was successful, and got them "in line" then I went back to the CMS to adjust the saturations, but the reds poped back out to their "standard" spot when I got my saturations where they needed to be. So the effort was in vain. I don't suggest anyone mess with setting the color super low or the tint in fear of their red saturations moving.


I'll let you know how the profile data goes when I get a chance.
Yeah, I messed around a bit with the color setting but ended up deciding the CMS settings for the primaries and secondaries were much more effective. And I just use the tint control for post-calibration tuning to avoid sunburned face on content.

My kids are older than yours, so rarely any more cartoons in our house. Though we did watch How to Tame Your Dragon II last night and it looked great. So cartoons are not a high priority for us, though we have and love all of the Miyazaki animations so I will check them out on the P70 when I get a chance (highly, highly recommended, by the way :).

And I'll agree this is an annoyance - I mean Sharp is a pretty well-rejected company, so why are they unable to deliver VA-panels with accurate Red Primaries when Samsung and AUO apparently can?
 

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Yeah, I messed around a bit with the color setting but ended up deciding the CMS settings for the primaries and secondaries were much more effective. And I just use the tint control for post-calibration tuning to avoid sunburned face on content.

My kids are older than yours, so rarely any more cartoons in our house. Though we did watch How to Tame Your Dragon II last night and it looked great. So cartoons are not a high priority for us, though we have and love all of the Miyazaki animations so I will check them out on the P70 when I get a chance (highly, highly recommended, by the way :).

And I'll agree this is an annoyance - I mean Sharp is a pretty well-rejected company, so why are they unable to deliver VA-panels with accurate Red Primaries when Samsung and AUO apparently can?

We watched "How to Tame Your Dragon II" this weekend as well, and it did look great. I feel like it was done well, nothing jumped out to me that was close to the 100% saturation that I'm speaking of.


You can get your skin colors in closer. A color check of just skins (24 colors?) I think my average dE was 1.3 or 1.2 with a max of 1.9 on the darker skin.


I see no sun burn.... Maleficent looked funny but that was mostly content (actors makeup).
A quick google image search of Miyazaki anime - the colors do not look that saturated so these will probably look great as well.


We watched Rio the other night... the orange on the toucan's beak. Ouch. Some reds. Ouch. The rest of the movie looked great and the wife didn't notice it, but I did... =/
 

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@superkyle and @Googer what are your latest P70 calibration settings? are they the links on the opening page? Or are they the posts below under reserved spaces.

@ZMad your's also please.
I've calibrated a pair of P70's at this point - my own personal set of course and a friend's. My current settings are in post 4 and those of my friend's (which includes a daytime calibration as well) are in post 5. :) Also in case it matters, as of this moment my set has firmware 1.0.0 and my friend's set has 1.0.4.1.
 
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