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Discussion Starter #1
Fedora 12 is released-

http://fedoraproject.org/


Release announcement

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_12_Announcement

Press release
http://www.redhat.com/about/news/pra...fedora-12.html

Release Notes
http://docs.fedoraproject.org/releas...12/en-US/html/

Feature List
http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/12/FeatureList


NOTES for Noobs:


If you don't know why you want/need the 64bit version (amd64), get the i686 32bit version. ("Just because I have a 64bit CPU" is *not* good enough reason )


With the new i686-only optimizations, your performance should be on par with 64bit versions for those with less than 4GB RAM.


Use Transmission or Deluge to download with the .torrent files linked below.
http://dev.deluge-torrent.org/wiki/Download


After downloading your .iso, FIRST check that your .ISO is good (not corrupted) by running the following in a terminal window:


sha1sum


where is whatever .iso you downloaded. Compare the number reported by sha1sum to the numbers in this post. If they don't match, delete the file and try again.


http://www.basiclinuxcommands.com/20...ums-value.html


Burn at no greater than 8x (maybe 16x ABSOLUTE MAX depending on burner and media quality) on good quality media. Generally, I've found that CD-R media quality tracks DVD+/-R media quality by manufacturer ID reasonably well. REMEMBER- blank media is identified by the manufacturer ID codes recorded on the media- NOT the brand name on the box! See
http://www.digitalfaq.com/reviews/dvd-media.htm


BURNING Software


Use Brasero (already installed in Ubuntu), or K3B


NeroLinux (Commercial, nonfree) http://www.nero.com/enu/linux4.html


or IMGBurn (free, closed source) in Wine. http://www.imgburn.com/

http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManage...ation&iId=4625


Install Wine before IMGBurn, of course-

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/AndreasBierfert/Wine



Assuming your .iso is good, please leave your torrent client running to help distribute (upload/"seed") to others for a couple of days.


BEFORE INSTALLING or UPGRADING


It is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to IMAGE (i.e. clone/copy/backup) your current OS partition(s)/ hard disk in case something gets mucked up while installing the new OS


Use Clonezilla to make an image to an external USB, eSATA drive or another internal partition with available space. Just use "Beginner" mode in the Clonezilla wizard.

http://clonezilla.org/
http://clonezilla.org/download/sourceforge/


Be aware of Linux partition/drive naming conventions to avoid overwriting a drive/partition you didn't intend to.

Linux drive/partition naming conventions

http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-p...rive-mappings/
http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Partition/devices.html
http://lissot.net/partition/


Download site
http://fedoraproject.org/get-fedora.html


Torrents-


Fedora-12-i686-Live (Gnome)
http://torrent.fedoraproject.org/tor...6-Live.torrent


5ad27455df004ee23fbc5a05dfa039a14e59956dccf4e767d493601e0bfa 4001 Fedora-12-i686-Live.iso



Fedora-12-i686-Live-KDE
http://torrent.fedoraproject.org/tor...ve-KDE.torrent


1bb64a4eedecf4730b47fcbb6c17b49d6deaccf7b00b17dd7b1091af57cf 1c1e Fedora-12-i686-Live-KDE.iso



Fedora-12-x86_64-Live (Gnome)
http://torrent.fedoraproject.org/tor...4-Live.torrent




RC4 downloads with LXDE, XFCE versions
http://alt.fedoraproject.org/pub/alt/stage/12-RC.4/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
 http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_12_Announcement


What's New in Fedora 12?


* Optimized performance - All software packages on 32-bit (x86_32) architecture have been compiled for i686 systems, with special optimization for the Intel Atom processors used in many netbooks, but without losing compatibility with the overwhelming majority of CPUs.


* Smaller and faster updates - In Fedora 11, the optional yum-presto plugin, developed by Fedora contributor Jonathan Dieter, reduced update size by transmitting only the changes in the updated packages. Now, the plugin is installed by default. Also, RPMs now use XZ rather than gzip for compression, providing smaller package sizes without the memory and CPU penalties associated with bzip2. This lets us fit more software into each Fedora image, and uses less space on mirrors, making their administrators' lives a little easier. Thanks to the Fedora infrastructure team for their excellent work in setting up the infrastructure to generate delta RPMs on the fly for all the updates.


* NetworkManager broadband and other enhancements - NetworkManager, originally developed by Red Hat's Dan Williams, was introduced in Fedora 7 and has become the de facto network configuration solution for distributions everywhere. Enhancements to NetworkManager make both system-wide connections and mobile broadband connections easier than ever. Bluetooth PAN support offers a simple click through process to access the Internet from your mobile phone. NetworkManager can now configure always-on and static address connections directly from the desktop. PolicyKit integration has been added so configuration management can be done via central policy where needed. IPv6 support has also been improved.


* Next-generation (Ogg) Theora video - For several years, Theora, the open and free format not encumbered by known patents has provided a way for freedom-loving users to share video. Fedora 12 includes the new Theora 1.1, which achieves very high quality comparable to H.264, meeting the expectations of demanding users with crisp, vibrant media in both streaming and downloadable form. Thanks to the work of the Xiph.Org Foundation's Christopher "Monty" Montgomery, sponsored by Red Hat, other Xiph developers and the contribution of Mozilla.org, Theora videos now deliver much better quality primarily via enhancements in the encoder without any change in the format, making it available to all Theora users. Using Theora video and Vorbis audio formats, Firefox 3.5 and applications using the Gstreamer multimedia framework can deliver free media on the web out of the box even better than the previous release of Fedora. Theora is being rapidly adopted by several popular websites including Wikipedia, VideoPress and DailyMotion. Fedora Project is proud to support communities of free culture and open content as part of our mission. More details at http://hacks.mozilla.org/2009/09/theora-1-1-released/


* Graphics support improvements - Fedora 12 introduces experimental 3D support for AMD Radeon HD 2400 and later graphics cards. To try it out, install the mesa-dri-drivers-experimental package. On many cards, this support should allow desktop effects to be used. Kernel mode setting (KMS) support, which was introduced on AMD hardware in Fedora 10 and extended to Intel hardware in Fedora 11, is now extended to NVIDIA hardware as well, meaning the great majority of systems now benefit from the smooth, fully-graphical startup sequence made possible by KMS. The Fedora graphical startup sequence now works better on systems with multiple monitors. Also on multiple monitor systems, the desktop will now automatically be spread across all monitors by default, rather than having all monitors display the same output, including on NVIDIA chips (where multiple monitor spanning was not possible without manual configuration changes in Fedora 11). Systems with NVIDIA graphics chips also gain initial support for suspend and resume functionality via the default Nouveau driver. Initial support for the new DisplayPort display connector has been added for Intel graphics chips. Support for Nvidia and ATI systems is already under rapid development and will be included in the next release of Fedora. Thanks to the Red Hat Xorg team including Adam Jackson (X server), Kristian Høgsberg (Intel driver), Dave Airlie and Jerome Glisse (Radeon driver for AMD), and Ben Skeggs (Nouveau driver for NVIDIA).


* Virtualization improvements - Not content with all the improvements in Fedora 11, we've kicked virtualization based on KVM up another notch in Fedora 12. There are extensive improvements in performance, management, and resource sharing, and still more security enhancements. A new library (libguestfs) and an interactive tool (guestfish) are now available for directly accessing and modifying virtual machine disk images. Richard W.M. Jones from Red Hat's virtualization team has a list of extensive virtualization tools available and coming up for Fedora at http://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/20...virt-commands/


* Automatic reporting of crashes and SELinux issues - Abrt, a tool to help non-power users report crashes to Bugzilla with a few mouse clicks, is now enabled by default. Abrt collects detailed information automatically and helps developers identify and resolve issues faster, improving the quality of individual upstream components and Fedora. The SELinux alert monitoring tool has also added the ability to report SELinux issues to Bugzilla quickly and easily with just a couple of clicks.


* New Dracut initrd generation tool - Up until Fedora 11, the boot system (initial ram disk or initrd) used to boot Fedora was monolithic, very distribution specific, and didn't provide much flexibility. This has been replaced with Dracut, an initial ram disk generation tool with an event-based framework designed to be distribution-independent. Dracut has been also adopted by OLPC which uses Fedora; OLPC modules for Dracut are available in the Fedora repository. Thanks to the Dracut team, including Harald Hoyer, Jeremy Katz, Dave Jones, and many others.


* PackageKit plugins - PackageKit now has a plugin which can install an appropriate package when a user tries to run a command from a missing package. Another new plugin allows installation of software packages from a web browser. Thanks to Red Hat's Richard Hughes and the PackageKit team.


* Bluetooth on-demand - Bluetooth services are automatically started when needed and stopped 30 seconds after last device use, reducing initial startup time and resource use when Bluetooth is not in active use. Thanks to Red Hat's Bastien Nocera.


* Moblin graphical interface for netbooks - In additional to special compiler optimization for netbooks in this release and the continued integration of Sugar interface, the Moblin graphical interface and applications are fully integrated thanks to Peter Robinson, a Fedora Project volunteer, and others. Collaboration between the Moblin project and Fedora was accelerated since Moblin itself is largely based on Fedora. To use it, just install the Moblin Desktop Environment package group using yum or the graphical software management tools, and choose Moblin from the login manager. A Moblin Fedora Remix (installable Live CD) for Fedora 12 will also be available.


* PulseAudio enhancements - Red Hat's Lennart Poettering and several others have made significant improvements to the PulseAudio system. Improved mixer logic makes volume control more fine-grained and reliable. Integration with the Rygel UPnP media server means you can stream audio directly from your system to any UPnP / DLNA client, such as a Playstation 3. Hotplug support has been made more intelligent, so if you configure a device as the default output for a stream, unplug that device -- causing the stream(s) to be moved to another output device -- and later reattach it, the stream is moved back to the preferred device. Finally, Bluetooth audio support means pairing with any Bluetooth audio device makes it available for use through PulseAudio.


* Lower process privileges - In order to mitigate the impact of security vulnerabilities, permissions have been hardened for many files and system directories. Also, process privileges have been lowered for a number of core components that require super user privileges. Red Hat's Steve Grubb has developed a new library, libcap-ng, and integrated it into many core system components to improve the security of Fedora.


* SELinux sandbox - It is now possible to confine applications' access to the system and run them in a secure sandbox that takes advantage of the sophisticated capabilities of SELinux. Dan Walsh, SELinux developer at Red Hat, explains the details at http://danwalsh.livejournal.com/31146.html


* Open Broadcom firmware - The openfwwf open source Broadcom firmware is included by default. This means wireless networking will be available out of the box on some Broadcom chipsets.


* Hybrid live images - The Live images provided in this release can be directly imaged onto a USB stick using dd (or any equivalent tool) to create bootable Live USB keys. The Fedora Live USB Creator for Windows and Fedora and the livecd-tools for Fedora are still recommended for data persistence, encryption and non-destructive writes. Thanks to Jeremy Katz.


* Better webcam support - While Fedora 11 improved webcam support, in Fedora 12 you can expect even better video quality, especially for less expensive webcams. Red Hat's Hans de Goede, developer of the libv4l library, has more details on his continuous upstream webcam support enhancements at http://hansdegoede.livejournal.com/6989.html .


* Polished Desktop - The latest version of the GNOME desktop includes the lighter Gnote replacement for Tomboy as the default note application, and Empathy replaces Pidgin as the default instant messenger. The new volume control application, first seen in Fedora 11, has been improved to cover more advanced users. There are many nice tweaks from the desktop team for a polished user experience. More details at https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Deskt...s_in_Fedora_12


* GNOME Shell preview - Fedora 12 includes an early version of GNOME Shell, which will become the default interface for GNOME 3.0 and beyond. To try it, install the gnome-shell package, and use the Desktop Effects configuration tool to enable it. It will only work correctly from the GNOME desktop environment, not others such as KDE or Xfce. This is a preview technology, and some video cards may not be supported. Thanks to Owen Taylor from Red Hat and the GNOME Shell team.


* KDE 4.3 - The new KDE features an updated "Air" theme and fully configurable keyboard shortcuts in Plasma, improved performance and new desktop effects in the window manager, a new bug reporting tool, and a configuration tool for the LIRC infra-red remote control system.


* Cool new stuff for developers beginning with Eclipse Galileo, which includes more plugins than ever before. Perl 6 is now included, along with PHP 5.3. For Haskell developers, the Haskell Platform now provides a standardized set of libraries and tools. But one of the biggest changes for developers is that most of the nice new features of Fedora 12, from Bluetooth to webcams, are implemented through underlying libraries, and many of the improvements will be included simply by relinking your application. Also available in this release are SystemTap 1.0 for improved instrumenting and debugging of binaries, complete with Eclipse integration, and the newest NetBeans IDE for Java development.


* Cool new stuff for sysadmins include added functionality for clustered Samba services (including active/active configurations) over GFS2; and the ability to boot a cluster of Fedora systems from a single, shared root file system.


* Multi-Pointer X - The update to X.Org server 1.7 introduces the X Input Extension version 2.0 (XI2), with much work contributed by Red Hat's Peter Hutterer. This extension provides a new client API for handling input devices and also Multi-Pointer X (MPX) functionality. MPX functionality allows X to cope with many inputs of arbitrary types simultaneously, a prerequisite for (among others) multitouch-based desktops and multi-user interaction on a single screen. This is low-level work of which applications and desktop environments will incrementally take advantage in future releases. More details are available in the Release Notes and in the XI2 tag of Peter Hutterer's blog at http://who-t.blogspot.com/search/label/xi2
 

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Discussion Starter #4
 http://linux.slashdot.org/story/09/1...ased?art_pos=6


Good slashdot discussion, including pros/cons vs Ubuntu and openSuse. Interesting post:


by Junta (36770) on Tuesday November 17, @01:56PM (#30132512)


It is subjective that Fedora does 'a lot more things a lot better'. They certainly have distinct aims from Ubuntu and gain some benefits, but I personally find Fedora to suffer some phenomena that Ubuntu does not:


-Out-of-the-box media/driver experience: Fedora goes purist and the out-of-the-box experience suffers for it with lack of popular codecs and optimal drivers for nVidia cards. Ubuntu caters to the user experience and takes care of this out of the box. You have to add RPM fusion repositories to make Fedora cope with this, which isn't insurmountable, but isn't out of the box.


-Fedora is not even stable within a release cycle in terms of offered featureset. I.e. I recall gaim 1.x being replaced with gaim 2.0 one day without requiring any particular update. This is good for enthusiasts who always want the cutting edge, bad for end-users who only want change at certain times they could expect (and for documenters doing screenshots). I recall once Fedora reving the kernel revision entirely without jumping releases. This wasn't bad in and of itself, but they jumped before nVidia supported it, and my X was hosed. Ubuntu is more conservative with this, knowing it will just be 6 months before a new cycle comes anyway.


-Fedora is 'too' comfortable with cutting edge changes, even to the point of releasing versions ahead of upstream *or* backporting code from future versions into older versions that upstream projects didn't want to do. For example, they backported things from the 2.6.32 branch to 2.6.31. The upstream kernel people weren't comfortable enough with the features to allow them into 2.6.31 or any release that aligned with their cycle, so they simply put 2.6.32 stuff into 2.6.31. This has been a longstanding tendency with RH (everyone probably remembers the gcc 2.96 debacle). BTW, this is even worse in RHEL, where they will backport 2.6.3x changes to 2.6.18, severely breaking third party kernel modules that code for the 'API' of 2.6.18 that gets broken by the massive amount of backports. Some third party even writes to newer 'apis', but wraps it with '> 2.6.26' sorts of ifdefs and thus assumes the 'old' api and RHEL will completely screw those assumptions. Ubuntu *usually* doesn't jump the gun (GRUB 2 is an example of going before the upstream declares 'ready' though).


-I *still* can't quite put my finger on it, but something about the Ubuntu desktop feels, subjectively to me, more whole rather than merely a conglomeration of the parts. This may simply be a matter of certain tastes they appear to me, because I can't nail it down.
 

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Last wednesday I lost my system drive due to age. I was running FC10 on that and fought it into submission over a year and finally had it mostly working.


On Friday I replaced the dead drive and installed Ubuntu. Thought it was "okay" but I'm an old school RH user from 10 years ago. I just saw too many differences that I didn't like so I installed FC12 instead.


So far I'm really liking FC12 and find it better than 10 was. There are a couple of things that made this install much more friendly to me. one was an RPM for mplayer which incorporated the vdpau codecs. Also I found an RPM for the newest NVIDIA driver.


Those two made life much better for me. I found both of them on the "fedora forums".


Video playback is a little smoother and the OS seems a little more snappy than 10.


I would recommend this to anyone who know their way around Linux.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by -DK- /forum/post/17590373


... installed Ubuntu. Thought it was "okay" but I'm an old school RH user from 10 years ago.

Same here
I just tried Mandriva, Suse and I'm back to Fedora ...


Quote:
Originally Posted by -DK- /forum/post/17590373


Also I found an RPM for the newest NVIDIA driver.

Do you have a link handy? RPMFusion has one in updates-testing, but it's for a newer kernel.
 

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Did anyone else's hdmi audio break moving from an early Fedora (10,11) to F12? (install not upgrade, but same hardware)


I'm having a heck of a time getting HDMI audio to work again. It briefly worked for one gnome session, but now it's gone after "yum update", and I can't for the life of me get it back.

having all kind of problems. alsa:device=plughw=0.3 doesn't work for mplayer ("unknown PCM")


I don't care about system sounds, firefox, flash, anything. This is a dedicated media PC attached to my receiver. I just want xbmc and mplayer to be able to access the hardware again. Grrr, argh.


onboard GeForce 9300, on Asus P5N7A-VM
Code:
Code:
card 0: NVidia [HDA NVidia], device 0: ALC1200 Analog [ALC1200 Analog]
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 0: NVidia [HDA NVidia], device 1: ALC1200 Digital [ALC1200 Digital]
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 0: NVidia [HDA NVidia], device 3: NVIDIA HDMI [NVIDIA HDMI]
  Subdevices: 1/1
  Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
Thinking I had a good thing going with F10 and never should have updated.


On the up-side, nvidia 190.42 driver with vdpau is working perfectly after purging nouveau. Just need sound to go with the pretty picture, and I refuse to use spdif/analog when hdmi used to work. I really don't want to reinstall. Starting to get annoyed with the Fedora playground.
 

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I installed Fedora 12 on a PC meant to be an audio/video machine. It actually is my first PC, with a Creative Audigy 2 sound card. It has a P4 3.06 CPU and a nVidia 6800XT AGP graphics card. It also has a surround sound speaker system and I just installed a Blu-ray burner in it.


After installing Fedora 12, I turned it into an audio distribution. I used the packages available from Planet CCRMA.

http://ccrma.stanford.edu/planetccrma/software/


I added the real-time kernel too. I did have a bit of trouble installing it on Fedora 12. Because of the newness of Fedora 12, not all of the packages needed to install were available yet. I used some packages for Fedora 11, and everything went fine.


I chronicled my installation procedure HERE . Hopefully the missing packages will eventually be made. I understand that Planet CCRMA is a one-man operation.


On a side note, I ripped my Star Trek Blu-ray to play on it. I found that the mplayer provided didn't support H264, so I had to compile it. When I did, I got some errors. I had to edit two of the source files to get it to compile. It starts up, but I get an error and it crashes 2 out of 3 times. I still can't play the ripped Blu-ray because it can't seem to use the '-vo xvmc' option when playing the Blu-ray file. Without hardware acceleration, the video is unplayable. But the surround sound is awesome!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by waterhead /forum/post/17832762


I still can't play the ripped Blu-ray because it can't seem to use the '-vo xvmc' option when playing the Blu-ray file. Without hardware acceleration, the video is unplayable. But the surround sound is awesome!

IIRC, xvmc is only for mpeg2.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I finally got around to installing F12 on my main rig, an X2 5400BE at 3Ghz on a BioStar 7050PV board with a 10 partition OS drive for testing various Linux releases.


Brief impressions:


The installer wizard looked very corporate, and the partitioner wasn't clear to understand how to do a custom partition layout- assigning partitions/mountpoints manually. I figured it out, but a noob to Linux installs would have a problem if trying to make a dual boot or multi boot like I did.


The dearth of default apps like Oo was disappointing though understandable with easy to access .rpm's or repos. In general, the default F12 install is very sparse re: user apps. Again not a big deal assuming you have a high speed internet connection and know where/how to get the software, but I know several people still on dialup.


The biggest faux paux IMO is that the F12 installer totally overwrites your grub bootloader and your machine simply boots F12 like nothing else is there!? Maybe I missed a pick during the install, or maybe there was a key to hit to bring up a menu with other OS's, but I couldn't tell nor was it obvious.


Good thing I installed Ubuntu 9.04 after the F12 experiment. Jaunty restored a good grub 1.5 menu, recognizing all OS's I had installed, including Mandriva 2010 and even the rude F12 partition



IMO, any liveCD installer worth its salt MUST at minimum be polite and ask to either use your current grub (adding itself to your current boot menu), or replace your bootloader AND add all installed OS's.


Even Ubuntu doesn't ask to overwrite your current grub bootloader, but at least it recognizes and lists all the OS's you do have loaded on the bootloader it installs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb /forum/post/17968955


... and your machine simply boots F12 like nothing else is there!? Maybe I missed a pick during the install, or maybe there was a key to hit to bring up a menu with other OS's, but I couldn't tell nor was it obvious...

During boot you can hit a key (I think it's any key, but I may be wrong) to bring grub menu and there you can find all your installs. To see menu by default edit /etc/grub.conf and comment out "hiddenmenu". It's all there...


F12 is being rude
I like that one ...
 
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