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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Kraine has posted his review of the DLA-X5900 (DLA-RS440) here.

Some quotes:
"Lcos technology generally gives a very uniform image. The X5900 is no exception to the rule, no appearance of bright corners as it could produce in the past or hot spot."

"
Ultra HD support was already at a very good level on the latest generation JVC, this year some progress has been made with a slightly larger color space obtained thanks to an internal filter and a dynamic iris now operational in HDR ."
First I've seen of any mention of a slightly larger color space obtained by an internal filter!


"JVC also announces that HDMI sync has been improved and lag input has been further reduced. The manufacturer also highlights that the integrated 18Gb / s HDMI chipset supports color resolutions up to 4: 4: 4: 4: 4 or 36bit even at 50Hz and 60Hz. This is a distinct advantage in 4K compared to Sony, which is limited to 13.5 Gb / s."

"A day in the life of Billy Lynn, ultra HD HFR 60fps is read without problem by the JVC with its 18Gbps HDMI chipset ."

99% Final Rating!

Looks like a really good review of a golden sample! I wonder if I could buy it from him!



 

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Kraine has posted his review of the DLA-X5900 (DLA-RS440) here.

Some quotes:
"Lcos technology generally gives a very uniform image. The X5900 is no exception to the rule, no appearance of bright corners as it could produce in the past or hot spot."

"
Ultra HD support was already at a very good level on the latest generation JVC, this year some progress has been made with a slightly larger color space obtained thanks to an internal filter and a dynamic iris now operational in HDR ."
First I've seen of any mention of a slightly larger color space obtained by an internal filter!


"JVC also announces that HDMI sync has been improved and lag input has been further reduced. The manufacturer also highlights that the integrated 18Gb / s HDMI chipset supports color resolutions up to 4: 4: 4: 4: 4 or 36bit even at 50Hz and 60Hz. This is a distinct advantage in 4K compared to Sony, which is limited to 13.5 Gb / s."

"A day in the life of Billy Lynn, ultra HD HFR 60fps is read without problem by the JVC with its 18Gbps HDMI chipset ."

99% Final Rating!

Looks like a really good review of a golden sample! I wonder if I could buy it from him!



Enjoyable read. I like the numerical score...also the fact many machines have already been reviewed which I don't think is the case here. I might want to read more about the Acer laser based on their review.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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I've been using my RS440 the last couple if weeks. Got a great deal from Mike Garrett at AVScience (highly recommended). I've owned an RS4810, RS4910, RS500, Epson LS10000 and the RS440 puts out the best UHD image I've seen from any of these. Eshift5 is not only nicely detailed, but looks more analog and natural from anything I've seen. Looking forward to getting Chad B out at some point here and will get contrast measured. I'm guessing it will be between 20-30,000:1 native once calibrated.
 

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Has anyone else picked up this projector? Seems like the 540/640 thread is bustling, and this one is a bit dead. I am in the process of building a dedicated theater room, and when it's done in a couple of months the 440 will almost certainly be the projector I'll be putting in.

I saw mention in the 540/640 thread of the differences between those models and the 440, and one of them was that this model doesn't have a dual iris. My understanding was that all three models had a dynamic iris, and another iris that can be adjusted to cap maximum light output. Does the 440 not have that second iris.

The other difference is the P3 filter, which isn't present in the 440 apparently. What are the implications of this?

Thanks.
 

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Has anyone else picked up this projector? Seems like the 540/640 thread is bustling, and this one is a bit dead. I am in the process of building a dedicated theater room, and when it's done in a couple of months the 440 will almost certainly be the projector I'll be putting in.

I saw mention in the 540/640 thread of the differences between those models and the 440, and one of them was that this model doesn't have a dual iris. My understanding was that all three models had a dynamic iris, and another iris that can be adjusted to cap maximum light output. Does the 440 not have that second iris.

The other difference is the P3 filter, which isn't present in the 440 apparently. What are the implications of this?

Thanks.
Correct, the RS440 has one iris and you do have the dynamic ability.

A recent RS420 review indicated around 90% of P3. It does not have a P3 filter, so you would lose a bit of saturation especially at brighter levels but doubt it will make a big difference in movies.
 

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Correct, the RS440 has one iris and you do have the dynamic ability.

A recent RS420 review indicated around 90% of P3. It does not have a P3 filter, so you would lose a bit of saturation especially at brighter levels but doubt it will make a big difference in movies.
AVForums stated 100% P3 on the X5900 (same model as RS440)

"In terms of its coverage of the Rec. 2020 colour gamut, the X5900 delivered an excellent 74%, which is a bit higher than the X5000 we reviewed previously. It isn't quite the widest we've measured, the Epson EH-TW7300 managed a massive 78%, but it was enough to cover 100% of DCI-P3 when measured using both xy and uv coordinates."
 

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Kraine has posted his review of the DLA-X5900 (DLA-RS440) here.

Some quotes:
"Lcos technology generally gives a very uniform image. The X5900 is no exception to the rule, no appearance of bright corners as it could produce in the past or hot spot."

"
Ultra HD support was already at a very good level on the latest generation JVC, this year some progress has been made with a slightly larger color space obtained thanks to an internal filter and a dynamic iris now operational in HDR ."
First I've seen of any mention of a slightly larger color space obtained by an internal filter!


"JVC also announces that HDMI sync has been improved and lag input has been further reduced. The manufacturer also highlights that the integrated 18Gb / s HDMI chipset supports color resolutions up to 4: 4: 4: 4: 4 or 36bit even at 50Hz and 60Hz. This is a distinct advantage in 4K compared to Sony, which is limited to 13.5 Gb / s."

"A day in the life of Billy Lynn, ultra HD HFR 60fps is read without problem by the JVC with its 18Gbps HDMI chipset ."

99% Final Rating!

Looks like a really good review of a golden sample! I wonder if I could buy it from him!



There is no internal filter on the RS440 for HDR.
 

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Enjoyable read. I like the numerical score...also the fact many machines have already been reviewed which I don't think is the case here. I might want to read more about the Acer laser based on their review.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
Except you can ignore the contrast measurements, they are not even remotely close to being correct and you can ignore the part about the 440 having an internal filter giving it a wider color space.
 

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AVForums stated 100% P3 on the X5900 (same model as RS440)

"In terms of its coverage of the Rec. 2020 colour gamut, the X5900 delivered an excellent 74%, which is a bit higher than the X5000 we reviewed previously. It isn't quite the widest we've measured, the Epson EH-TW7300 managed a massive 78%, but it was enough to cover 100% of DCI-P3 when measured using both xy and uv coordinates."
And they would be completely wrong.
 

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Maybe the real question is, will you ever use the color filter on the 540/640 when you're looking to maximize brightness for HDR anyway?? Obviously depends on your screen size and screen material, but most have a large enough screen that this is a problem.
 

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Correct, the RS440 has one iris and you do have the dynamic ability.

A recent RS420 review indicated around 90% of P3. It does not have a P3 filter, so you would lose a bit of saturation especially at brighter levels but doubt it will make a big difference in movies.
AVForums stated 100% P3 on the X5900 (same model as RS440)

"In terms of its coverage of the Rec. 2020 colour gamut, the X5900 delivered an excellent 74%, which is a bit higher than the X5000 we reviewed previously. It isn't quite the widest we've measured, the Epson EH-TW7300 managed a massive 78%, but it was enough to cover 100% of DCI-P3 when measured using both xy and uv coordinates."
Not accurate.
 

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Maybe the real question is, will you ever use the color filter on the 540/640 when you're looking to maximize brightness for HDR anyway?? Obviously depends on your screen size and screen material, but most have a large enough screen that this is a problem.
Yeah, just depends on the set-up. More brightness definitely helps with HDR.
 

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Maybe the real question is, will you ever use the color filter on the 540/640 when you're looking to maximize brightness for HDR anyway?? Obviously depends on your screen size and screen material, but most have a large enough screen that this is a problem.
You have a choice with the 540 and 640. You do not have that choice with 440. But, yes, if you do not have enough brightness for HDR with filter, it will go unused, but there is still a big difference in contrast. In my family room set up, I went from a 60,000:1 to 120,000:1 contrast projector. Shooting onto a 1.3 gain FireHawk screen in a room with off white walls, the difference in black level and contrast was huge. The walls are not close to the screen and the white ceiling is 17', so I am getting less reflected light back than some people.
 

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Seems like the 540/640 thread is bustling, and this one is a bit dead.

Funny you mention this, as someone not familiar with JVC, I had a hard time finding this thread, as DLA-X5900 is in the name, rather than DLA-X590 - some search tools won’t include it! Also I don’t understand why the lower end models aren’t generally in the under 3000 forums.

That said, I’m particularly interested to know how much improvement in low lag mode is there in the 590 vs the 570. My current projector is a Panasonic ae8000u which I bought over the jvc several years ago due to the lack of a gaming mode. I noticed the French site recorded 36ms on the 570 vs 41 on the 590, which runs counter to JVC’s marketing slick which indicates further improvements were made.



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Maybe the real question is, will you ever use the color filter on the 540/640 when you're looking to maximize brightness for HDR anyway?? Obviously depends on your screen size and screen material, but most have a large enough screen that this is a problem.
Yes, good point. How much brightness do you lose through the filter?

I will be on an acoustically transparent 2.35:1 AR screen at 105" wide. Probably using the Seymour UF material, so the gain will be 0.8. I will still have plenty of brightness for SDR material, but probably not as much as would be ideal for HDR.

I am a little bummed about the static iris being omitted from the 440. Then again, given the brightness issue, maybe I wouldn't need to stop it down much anyway. Just use low lamp for SDR stuff and high lamp for HDR I guess.
 

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Yes, good point. How much brightness do you lose through the filter?

I will be on an acoustically transparent 2.35:1 AR screen at 105" wide. Probably using the Seymour UF material, so the gain will be 0.8. I will still have plenty of brightness for SDR material, but probably not as much as would be ideal for HDR.

I am a little bummed about the static iris being omitted from the 440. Then again, given the brightness issue, maybe I wouldn't need to stop it down much anyway. Just use low lamp for SDR stuff and high lamp for HDR I guess.
I've seen varying numbers on the filter loss from 8 to 13%.

My screen is a scope 9 foot wide Stewart ST100 (1.0 gain). I have black carpet, Rosco painted black walls, Protostar and some velvet near screen. I'm good with 13 to 14 ftl on SDR so I should be able to clamp the iris all of the way down for max contrast. For HDR, it will be different and I might be using high lamp to be able to close the iris down some for better contrast...still not sure how bright it will be...will see when Chad comes out.
 

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I'm a first-time projector owner with a very large media room (long throw distance), and am seeking suggestions regarding the JVC DLA-X590R vs. Epson 5040/6040UB. In the last year, at one time or another, I've owned the Epson 5040UB, 5040UBe, and now the JVC DLA-X590R from Magnolia.

My setup is as follows:
Receiver: Marantz SR6011
Speakers: 2 Martin Logan Motion 60XT Floorstanding Speakers and 1 ML 50XT Center Channel
Sub: Dynamo 1000w sub
Current Projector: JVC DLA-X590RB from BB
Screen: Inherited (came with house/media room) 146" diagonal screen of unknown brand

I'll try my best to keep this short, I originally purchased the Epson 5040UB in Jan 2017, received a defective unit (or two), decided to switch out for the 5040UBe, switched back to the 5040UB, and subsequently swapped that out for the new JVC DLA X-590R as of a week and a half ago. As noted above, I'm very new to the projector/home theater realm, and have basically taken a crash course in home theater setups over the past 9 months (i.e. reading as much about home theaters/projectors to better understand the industry and determine the best projector for my particular setup). The media room is completely light-controlled, however, I do sometimes prefer to have a little bit of light on while watching the projector. I mainly use the projector for watching sports/other TV shows on DirecTV (50-60% of the time), streaming Netflix (10-20% of the time) and after recently picking up an Xbox one X, gaming 15-20% of the time.

I've read a lot of the forums and reviews on the Epson 5040UB and the limited material out there regarding the new JVC X590. I decided to switch to the JVC after purchasing the Apple TV 4k and the XBOX one X. At the time, I was setup with an Epson 5040UB, but ran into all of the compatibility issues noted with the apple tv 4k and xbox one x due to the apparent limitations of the chip in the 5040ub. After speaking with the Magnolia guy who has been out to see my setup and has been helping me all along, he convinced me to upgrade to the JVC and said it would be noticeably better than the Epson and -- best of all -- there are no compatibility issues with apple tv and xbox one x. The media room I'm working with has high vaulted ceilings probably 17-20 feet at the highest point down to 8-9 feet in the back of the room -- which means I have a large throw distance of a little over 20+ feet. I setup an appointment to have a professional calibrator to come out to the house, and we started talking about the differences between the Epson and the JVC units I've had or currently have. My issue is that the Epson 5040 was obviously much brighter (meaning I could watch TV with the lights on or a couple of the curtains open) and had great picture quality in my opinion. Now that I've gotten ahold of the new JVC, which is obviously known for its awesome black levels and I've been told its contrast is much better than the Epson, as well as its HDR performance. I have noticed that with the Xbox One X, playing Madden on the JVC is incredible given the capabilities of the Xbox One X paired with the JVC.

However, when I started discussing the JVC X590 vs. Epson 5040 with the calibrator, he noted that at my throw distance of 20-22' the screen is receiving a lot less light as compared to the Epson I previously had mounted in the back of the room. I don't remember the technical term, but he said something along the lines of at a typical movie theater you would see the picture at approximately 12 units, at my throw distance with the JVC he said the max would be 8 units on a new bulb, and went on to tell me the Epson would display approximately 32 light units with a new bulb. He actually personally recommended I switch back to the Epson (and happily take that $2K+ back I spent on the new JVC) because in his opinion, I wouldn't be able to "reap the benefits of the JVC's superior contrast, HDR mode, etc." due to the large throw distance and that I likely wouldn't be able to tell the difference (if any) between the two units were I to switch back to the Epson. Being new to this whole thing, it raised a bunch of questions in my mind: (1) Would others recommend switching back to the Epson 5040ub from the JVC x590r given the room situation and current throw distance? (2) Should I try and move the JVC up to 19.5' throw distance (which he said was the max to achieve projection on a 146" screen) and that would take care of the perceived diminished brightness? (3) Do I switch back to the Epson, and re-invest that money in a better screen in order to take advantage of the Epson's abilities? Since I'm so new to the projector scene, I wanted to just throw this long-winded story about my setup out there to the folks I know have much more experience and expertise in this area to see what they'd recommend I do to maximize the home theater enjoyment. Any thoughts/suggestions on this or what you would do in this situation? I do absolutely love the picture on the JVC with the lights completely off, but am basically unable to watch it with the lights on (first world problems -- I know, right!), and can definitely tell the 4k and HDR modes are better on the JVC in a dark room. But since my main use for this for the room is more to watch TV and play Xbox on occasion than to watch 4k HDR movies in a dark room, it almost seems like a better idea to go back to the Epson and maybe invest the money elsewhere in my media room (e.g. upgrading the unknown projector screen from previous homeowner and/or adding 2 more rear speakers). If you took the time to read through this entire post -- thank you -- and please feel free to let me know what you'd suggest.

Thanks,
Matt
 
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