AVS Forum banner

19021 - 19040 of 29198 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,810 Posts
Thanks. Yes, my SI screen is nominal 1.3 Gain. How close to 1.3 it really is, I don't know. The 85 - 96 range you indicate with true 1.3 Gain is quite close to my 100, so it's not that far off.

And I'll be checking the lux reading with the Dr. Meter in the near future, to verify this. As we all know, all products are going to have a range of specs (projector, bulb, screen material, etc.), so if I happened to be on the upper end of the specs, that might explain why I'm a little higher than expected overall.

In any case, specs aside, what I'm seeing far exceeds anything I've seen before in a projector, so there is that!
The Spyder software measures the nits off the screen , so it eliminates the need to assume screen gain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,700 Posts
The Spyder software measures the nits off the screen , so it eliminates the need to assume screen gain.
Thanks. I've never looked at the Software or Drivers that came with the Spyder, since I've only used it for JVC's Autocalibration so far. Will include this in the list of things to check on in the coming days and weeks.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
26,593 Posts
I will take it then that I should not be overly concerned about bright corners especially when comparing the overall black level to my current Sony 285. So with the lens memories, DTM, better black level, better 3D...I think I am ready to pull the trigger on the RS2000/NX7. I thought I would wait to see if all the features of the JVC would come in a laser projector under $10,000. But, it doesn't look like that will happen at least for 3 or more years (Is that the general consensus here?). So, I might as well enjoy content on a lamp based projector until that happens for the next 3-5 years and get the JVC which would be a big improvement over my Sony 285 for now. What do you guys think?
I would agree with you...........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
The Spyder software measures the nits off the screen , so it eliminates the need to assume screen gain.
Do you mean the Datacolor software ?

Is this possible with HCFR as well ? It's already quite a pain to start playing with Autocal and soon with HCFR and DisplayCall for my monitor and ArgyllCMS for the printer, that my old brain is not keen on starting with yet another one ...... :eek::eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,181 Posts
Stupid question. Planning my install and I’m getting two different minimum throw lengths from the JVC manual and the Projector Central calculator. My screen is 2.35:1 and 130” wide.

Min based on JVC manual is 14’ 10”
Min based on the calculator is 15’ 8”

What should I go with?
As a guess, the discrepancy is probably because the JVC manual's chart is based on the PJ's native 17:9 (1.91:1) aspect ratio, using the Zoom function to use the whole width of the imaging panel, while the Projector Central calculator is probably based on the normal 16:9 (1.78:1) imaging area of most projectors.

I use the Zoom setting for anything 1.91:1 or wider. I'll even use it for 1.85:1 films as well, as it shaves off so little from the top and bottom - about 2/3" each, with a 5' 10" high image.

In the attached image of the grid the projector throws in Lens Adjust mode for focus and shift, the outer pair of vertical lines are for the 17:9 frame, and the next pair in are for the 16:9 frame. (The top and bottom pair of lines are common to both.)

I'm not sure what the horizontal and vertical lines that have boxes at their intersections signify. I think those verticals may be for 4:3 (1.33:1), and those horizontals may be for one of the cinerama ratios - maybe 2.35:1.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,779 Posts
Do you mean the Datacolor software ?

Is this possible with HCFR as well ? It's already quite a pain to start playing with Autocal and soon with HCFR and DisplayCall for my monitor and ArgyllCMS for the printer, that my old brain is not keen on starting with yet another one ...... :eek::eek:
Yes both.

When you start a calibration with DisplayCAL the first thing it does is shows you white balance for 100% white as well as luminance in nits.

With HCFR just bring up a 100% white pattern and look at the luminance (Y) reading, again it's in nits.

This is the most accurate way to get your display's brightness since it will measure your screen's actual gain and be especially accurate if you can put your meter near your seat or at least position it at a similar viewing angle as the seating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,740 Posts
Stupid question. Planning my install and I’m getting two different minimum throw lengths from the JVC manual and the Projector Central calculator. My screen is 2.35:1 and 130” wide.

Min based on JVC manual is 14’ 10”
Min based on the calculator is 15’ 8”

What should I go with?
You have to look and see if the chart or calculator is using the 16:9 panel width or the full panel width. If you want to maintain 1:1 pixel mapping, you would use the 16:9 panel width, which list 15'-7" as minimum throw. You need to allow a few inches extra, so would use 15'-10" throw for minimum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,810 Posts
Thanks. I've never looked at the Software or Drivers that came with the Spyder, since I've only used it for JVC's Autocalibration so far. Will include this in the list of things to check on in the coming days and weeks.
The driver is already installed if you can run autocal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,458 Posts
I have bright corners and rarely see them in real content but I will take the bright corners over the fade to grey crap I have seen in other projectors.

That would suck if JVC does that because of a few people that just need to watch a movie on a great projector and get over it. JMO Now if it is a real defect that really affects content that is a different issue.
Poor grey uniformity can be worse for sure. JVCs are generally outstanding here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,700 Posts
The driver is already installed if you can run autocal.
Yeah, maybe it was just the software that I never installed for it. It's been a few years since I set it up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,810 Posts
Do you mean the Datacolor software ?

Is this possible with HCFR as well ? It's already quite a pain to start playing with Autocal and soon with HCFR and DisplayCall for my monitor and ArgyllCMS for the printer, that my old brain is not keen on starting with yet another one ...... :eek::eek:
HCFR and DisplayCAL are both better choices. I only suggested the Datacolor Spyder software in case people don’t want to install the unsigned ArgyllCMS driver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
As a guess, the discrepancy is probably because the JVC manual's chart is based on the PJ's native 17:9 (1.91:1) aspect ratio, using the Zoom function to use the whole width of the imaging panel, while the Projector Central calculator is probably based on the normal 16:9 (1.78:1) imaging area of most projectors.

I use the Zoom setting for anything 1.91:1 or wider. I'll even use it for 1.85:1 films as well, as it shaves off so little from the top and bottom - about 2/3" each, with a 5' 10" high image.

In the attached image of the grid the projector throws in Lens Adjust mode for focus and shift, the outer pair of lines are the 17:9 frame, and the inner pair are the 16:9 frame.
You have to look and see if the chart or calculator is using the 16:9 panel width or the full panel width. If you want to maintain 1:1 pixel mapping, you would use the 16:9 panel width, which list 15'-7" as minimum throw. You need to allow a few inches extra, so would use 15'-10" throw for minimum.
I shouldn’t have to move it back though right? If I’m actually using the full width of my scope screen, wouldn’t I also be using the full width of the chip? And for 16:9 material wouldn’t I just be adjusting the image size even smaller to maintain CIH?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,810 Posts
Yes both.

When you start a calibration with DisplayCAL the first thing it does is shows you white balance for 100% white as well as luminance in nits.

With HCFR just bring up a 100% white pattern and look at the luminance (Y) reading, again it's in nits.

This is the most accurate way to get your display's brightness since it will measure your screen's actual gain and be especially accurate if you can put your meter near your seat or at least position it at a similar viewing angle as the seating.
One pitfall to watch out for when using HCFR (and maybe DisplayCAL as well) internal pattern is to make sure only the graphics card or HCFR itself is set for the 16-235 Limited Range. Otherwise the measurement will be 20% too low.

If you use a disc pattern that eliminates the issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,740 Posts
I shouldn’t have to move it back though right? If I’m actually using the full width of my scope screen, wouldn’t I also be using the full width of the chip? And for 16:9 material wouldn’t I just be adjusting the image size even smaller to maintain CIH?
What is your throw distance?
If you use full panel width for scope images, you gain a little brightness, lose 1:1 pixel mapping and cut a tiny bit of the vertical image off. Some people are fine with that trade off, others are not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
What is your throw distance?
If you use full panel width for scope images, you gain a little brightness, lose 1:1 pixel mapping and cut a tiny bit of the vertical image off. Some people are fine with that trade off, others are not.
I can set my throw distance to whatever I want. I was thinking the closer the better just for the image brightness factor.

So my thought is leave it 1:1 for 16:9 material which is essentially a 113” screen, then zoom it for widescreen material and use the full width of the chip since the top/bottom is just blank anyway. Would loosing the 1:1 pixel mapping on scope material cause some distortion or something else I’m missing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,485 Posts
I wasn't aware of the DTM "HDR Level" Auto/Low/Medium/High option before reading the last few posts, since it's obviously not mentioned in the original manual, so I read the Frame_Adapt_HDR_setup_manual PDF that I downloaded along with the firmware update itself.

Assuming it defaults to Auto, I'm going to experiment with setting it to High, since I've got a 0.92 gain screen surface and I'm projecting my image 11 feet wide.

I'm happy with it already, but I'm hoping this will give my image even more "pop."
The High setting will make the image brighter, but it may also crush highlights on some content, so be on the lookout for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
You have to look and see if the chart or calculator is using the 16:9 panel width or the full panel width. If you want to maintain 1:1 pixel mapping, you would use the 16:9 panel width, which list 15'-7" as minimum throw. You need to allow a few inches extra, so would use 15'-10" throw for minimum.

I definitely do not understand the nuance here re. full panel width! Mike, could you help me calculate the absolute minimum throw distance for the nx7 and nx9 to a 120” wide 2.35:1 screen? I’m only using zoom to get wide. Huge thanks in advance! (I suspect I’m within cm of being able to use this next gen).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,849 Posts
I've got a quick question for anyone who can answer - What display frequency does the NX7 typically run at?

I know that my older JVCs would take 24p, create new frames to 48p - and then would double-flash at 96 hz

Is this still the same (when using frame interpolation), or is the highest refresh rate different now?

Thanks for the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,181 Posts
I wasn't aware of the DTM "HDR Level" Auto/Low/Medium/High option before reading the last few posts, since it's obviously not mentioned in the original manual, so I read the Frame_Adapt_HDR_setup_manual PDF that I downloaded along with the firmware update itself.

Assuming it defaults to Auto, I'm going to experiment with setting it to High, since I've got a 0.92 gain screen surface and I'm projecting my image 11 feet wide.

I'm happy with it already, but I'm hoping this will give my image even more "pop."
The High setting will make the image brighter, but it may also crush highlights on some content, so be on the lookout for that.
I've got the perfect test material for that: the ice planet in Interstellar!

But more seriously, I also have the Spears & Munsil UHD test disk but haven't played with it yet. Is there a section on that disk I can use to check for this issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,063 Posts
100 nits sounds high to me...I “thinkâ€Â I’️m at that level on my 125â€Â 2.35...I’️ll need to remeasure but if u r getting 100 nits on your size screen, you are doing well!
I was surprised as well, but I think this is accurate. I got the Dr. Meter yesterday, and just playing around with it with other light sources, my Note 8 wasn't far off (in fact, perhaps slightly under).

But your asking the question makes me think perhaps my calculations, not readings are off. I've had the meter at the screen, pointed toward the Projector, and reading the number in Lux. According to one post here, I forget exactly where, you multiple that by the gain of the screen, divide by pi, and this gives you the nits.

Other formulas take into account the surface area of the screen, and for my scope screen, I've been using the 63" x 147" of the actual visible screen area. I'm wondering if this is correct, since technically the actual screen area emitted by the projector at that zoom is 82.625" x 147". But my 100 nit estimated isn't based on those formulas.

But if I'm reading directly in lux with the light meter, then screen surface area isn't used in the calculation.

So I guess I'm a bit fuzzy here...
DLC photo 100 nits sounds high to me as others have said with such a large screen would be expecting some crazy lumens output jvc not capable off

Another way to check is, Light meters can measure Fc pointing back from screen to projector and you simply multiply the Fc with screen gain to get FL

FL to nits is a simple calc.

http://www.unitconversion.org/luminance/foot-lamberts-to-nits-conversion.html
 
19021 - 19040 of 29198 Posts
Top