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The Dynamic Range Adjustment slider works when playing HDR content, whether the Optimizer is On or Off.

The current conventional wisdom (unproven, just theoretical at this time as far as I am aware) is that leaving the Optimizer Off provides an 'unadulterated' signal to allow JVC's DTM to do what it does best. That is the current thinking anyway.

The Dynamic Range Adjustment is still a variable in HDR output from the 420/820/9000, and in fact was the subject of a recent post I made on this subject. There is a default position, which to some degree is arbitrary, and which may or may not be suitable for a given projector/screen/room. But it seems that this variable has not yet received much attention, in terms of determining whether or not making a change to the default setting would benefit or harm JVC's DTM functionality.

As I state there, the setting for this Adjustment is impacting DTM, as it is part of the Panny's HDR output processing. The question remains as to whether the default setting is, or isn't optimal for JVC's DTM, or whether it could be useful in customizing to one's individual room, projector, screen, etc.
So the Optimizer is off, but playing with the DRA slider still impacts the picture? Even though it is a subset of the Optimizer? Are we sure that playing with it just doesn't turn the Optimizer back on? Just seems strange that turning the Optimizer off would still allow its settings to do something.

I have everything zero'd and the Optimizer off on the 820. Perhaps I need to switch back to the Sony and see if the 820 is hindering DTM.
 

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So the Optimizer is off, but playing with the DRA slider still impacts the picture? Even though it is a subset of the Optimizer? Are we sure that playing with it just doesn't turn the Optimizer back on? Just seems strange that turning the Optimizer off would still allow its settings to do something.

I have everything zero'd and the Optimizer off on the 820. Perhaps I need to switch back to the Sony and see if the 820 is hindering DTM.
I've played some with this. The Optimizer as I understand it, reads the metadata (when present) and modifies the tone-mapping accordingly. The Dynamic Range Adjustment can be used in addition, to tweak the output to make it more suitable for one's own theater.

With the Optimizer Off, I can still make adjustments to the Dynamic Range Slider, and no, it does not turn the Optimizer back on. They are independent controls, and the DRS is not a subset of the Optimizer, as far as I am aware. They are separate controls.
 

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I've played some with this. The Optimizer as I understand it, reads the metadata (when present) and modifies the tone-mapping accordingly. The Dynamic Range Adjustment can be used in addition, to tweak the output to make it more suitable for one's own theater.

With the Optimizer Off, I can still make adjustments to the Dynamic Range Slider, and no, it does not turn the Optimizer back on. They are independent controls, and the DRS is not a subset of the Optimizer, as far as I am aware. They are separate controls.
I'm confusing it with DRA slider in the Optimizer. Where is the other adjustment located?
 

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I'm confusing it with DRA slider in the Optimizer. Where is the other adjustment located?
The manual doesn't have a screen capture, but basically in the Menu where you access the Optimizer (using the Options button, selecting the Video icon on the far left, I think), it is the item right below it if I remember it correctly.

The Dynamic Range Adjustment slider is the same control, and is available regardless of whether or not the Optimizer is On or Off. So it's not a separate adjustment; it is the same one.

Edited to Add:
When you choose Optimum HDR Adjustment via the Options menu, the Optimizer is the top choice I think, and the Dynamic Range Adjustment Slider is the choice below it. I can check it this evening to confirm.
 

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There is a default position, which to some degree is arbitrary, and which may or may not be suitable for a given projector/screen/room.
My understanding is that the default DRA position corresponds to the standard PQ curve, i.e., it is the “correct” setting for a direct view HDR10 TV. Put it another way, in the default position the output would be the same as a player that does not have such adjustments.

For projectors, the brightness depends on so many other factors (e.g., the screen size), so one has to find a setting that produces the correct overall brightness.
 

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My understanding is that the default DRS position corresponds to the standard PQ curve, i.e., it is the “correct” setting for a direct view HDR10 TV. Put it another way, the output would be the same as a player that does not have such adjustments.

For projectors, the brightness depends on so many other factors (e.g., the screen size), so one has to find a setting that produces the correct overall brightness.
Thanks, Dominic. This makes sense. And this is why I posed the question of whether or not adjusting this slider in a suitable fashion for our projector/screen/room, would complement what JVC's DTM is doing, or if itwould interfere with it, and therefore best left at the default setting.

I'll be experimenting with this once I get the NX7 fully integrated into my system.
 
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Thanks, Dominic. This makes sense. And this is why I posed the question of whether or not adjusting this slider in a suitable fashion for our projector/screen/room, would complement what JVC's DTM is doing, or if itwould interfere with it, and therefore best left at the default setting.

I'll be experimenting with this once I get the NX7 fully integrated into my system.
My assumption would be, while the DSR will have an impact, it's not the same (desired?) impact of the adjustment coming at the end of the process (after DTM), rather than in front of what DTM will be doing.
 

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I prepared a color profile + gamma curve for 3D and I shared them on this thread. However, they were realized with a spyder 5, so they were also correcting the inaccuracy of the meter plus putting the screen in the equation.
This means that if you apply it to a well calibrated VPR you risk to get bad results.
Now I own an i1pro2 and I started from a much better color calibration.
I realized after several attempts that correcting the gamma is sufficient. Basically it looks like a correction curve is fixing also the color deviation introduced by the glasses.
Of course my curve is based on my screen + glasses. I’m going to share it later, when I’ll get home.
After posting my question, I did download and import the 3D profile that you shared in this thread. Thanks for sharing this. God bless. :)
 

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Thanks, Dominic. This makes sense. And this is why I posed the question of whether or not adjusting this slider in a suitable fashion for our projector/screen/room, would complement what JVC's DTM is doing, or if itwould interfere with it, and therefore best left at the default setting.

I'll be experimenting with this once I get the NX7 fully integrated into my system.
In terms of the effects, the Optimizer changes the tone mapping of the highlights (primarily), whereas the DRA adjusts the overall brightness, similar to JVC’s Picture Tone.
 

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In terms of the effects, the Optimizer changes the tone mapping of the highlights (primarily), whereas the DRA adjusts the overall brightness, similar to JVC’s Picture Tone.
The DSR does nicely anchor the top end of the curve, such that whatever highights are present, don't get fully crushed.
 

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After posting my question, I did download and import the 3D profile that you shared in this thread. Thanks for sharing this. God bless. :)
As I told you, I got more reliable results now by starting with a better calibration made with i1pro2 (color) + spyderx (gamma).
Again, just use the gamma profile attached combined with standard BT.709 color profile.
Let me know if you like it. :)
 

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The DSR does nicely anchor the top end of the curve, such that whatever highights are present, don't get fully crushed.
Yes, unlike the JVC Contrast Control ;)
 

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As I told you, I got more reliable results now by starting with a better calibration made with i1pro2 (color) + spyderx (gamma).
Again, just use the gamma profile attached combined with standard BT.709 color profile.
Let me know if you like it. :)
Will do. Thanks!
 

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As I told you, I got more reliable results now by starting with a better calibration made with i1pro2 (color) + spyderx (gamma).
Again, just use the gamma profile attached combined with standard BT.709 color profile.
Let me know if you like it. :)
I read this message before it got deleted:
The 3D gamma shouldn’t be any different from a regular Normal gamma. Did you get a straight line in the “after” log?
The objective is exactly to get "a regular Normal gamma". Unfortunately the glasses alter it and so it needs to be corrected.
I'd like to explain how I did it:
  1. I autocalibrated normally a profile (iris=0, lamp=high, filter off), gamma with SpyderX and color with i1pro2.
  2. I put the VPR in 3D mode, placed the i1d2 facing the screen with 3D glasses in front and measured RGBW and a full grayscale
    - Primary colors were all a little undersaturated and the gamma was significantly altered, average very close to 2.
  3. I calculated a correction gamma curve to balance the deviation with an xls spreadsheet created by me, filled with the measured data
  4. I put the values in the attached jgd file and then loaded it on a custom gamma curve
  5. I measured again still though the glasses and I got a very good gamut and a better gamma curve: it is not perfect because the deviation cannot be fully corrected (red is very reluctant), but it is much more closer to the 2.2 reference.
This correction curve can be applied on top of a calibrated VPR to get the gamma corrected watching a 3D movie through the 3D glasses.
Don't forget to select "imported" when you set the custom correction curve.
 

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After seeing the Frame Adapt HDR High setting cause loss of detail in the clouds on earth at the beginning of Interstellar and in the frozen clouds over Mann's planet in that film, I went back to Auto for that setting for a day.

But I've experimented with a few more films, and I'm defaulting to High again.

I'll use Auto for special cases - films with a lot of "high key" imagery (a term used by photographers for pictures whose darkest tones are still nearly white).

I've also decided that for SDR material - particularly cable tv - the Cinema setting is better than Natural, which can look quite pale.
 

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My understanding is that the default DRA position corresponds to the standard PQ curve, i.e., it is the “correct” setting for a direct view HDR10 TV. Put it another way, in the default position the output would be the same as a player that does not have such adjustments. For projectors, the brightness depends on so many other factors (e.g., the screen size), so one has to find a setting that produces the correct overall brightness.
From page 27 of the UB820 user manual: Dynamic Range Adjustment : Set the brightness of the entire screen when outputting HDR (High Dynamic Range) video to a connected HDR-compatible TV.
 

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After seeing the Frame Adapt HDR High setting cause loss of detail in the clouds on earth at the beginning of Interstellar and in the frozen clouds over Mann's planet in that film, I went back to Auto for that setting for a day.
Have you ever selected the option for "Super White" (extended white range)? I found that it did the best job of 'taming' the difficult bright scenes in 'The Meg' (etc.) without affecting black levels.
 

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Sounds strange. No idea what you have going on but it sounds like you need to check out a few different things. If all your sources are getting dimmer on your projector I'd start there. Could be lamp issues. Try switching to High bulb for a bit then go back to your low setting if that's what you were using. Sometimes that fixes the issue.
On the projector the aperture was stuck, return it to zero. Bright picture returned

On the Roku i set it for 4k 30ps instead of 4k 60fps, bingo 4k back
 

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Have you ever selected the option for "Super White" (extended white range)? I found that it did the best job of 'taming' the difficult bright scenes in 'The Meg' (etc.) without affecting black levels.
Super White “wastes” about 20% of the peak lumens.
 

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Have you ever selected the option for "Super White" (extended white range)? I found that it did the best job of 'taming' the difficult bright scenes in 'The Meg' (etc.) without affecting black levels.
I've never used that option. How would that interact with using the HDR High setting in Frame Adapt mode?

What I'm trying to do is get the glowing special effect yellows and slightly brighter skin tones in dark scenes without sacrificing subtle detail in the clouds in the sky in bright scenes.

I'm looking for a "set and forget" setting - which may be unattainable. As it is, I can get what I like in different films by switching back and forth.
 
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