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I watched part of it last night, agreed here, definitely a reference UHD disc to show off the JVC and a good ATMOS setup. Can't wait for the 2nd movie...
Amazon better put some of the 4K UHD discs on sale for Black Friday week - I'm gathering quite a list !
 

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Hola Amigos.

I've been on the light side of the projection moon looking at Epson units to date and considering the dark side. lol

While on the Epson threads, I often read comparisons with JVC projectors, so I wanted to know, short of the new laser projector that retails for $35K, which medium range unit in the Procision line is considered to provide the most bang for your buck and why? Is the 9000 that much better than say the 500 or 550 in real-world viewing? This will be mated to some type of 16X9 100" diagonal ALR screen with a 12' throw. The projector may be used occasionally during the day where there is a modest amount of ambient light in room (5-7 FC depending on where you measure), but is likely to be used mostly at night when there is little to no ambient light.

I am also considering a large 85" LED TV, but prefer a larger more immersive experience; thus why I am looking into projection. Here is a layout of my Family Room, as you can see the window and sliders are a challenge, however, one opening has blinds, the other sheer curtains.

Thanks for your help guys.



Andres
If you have light colored walls and a white ceiling, then there is less separation in image quality between the X550 and the X750. We carry the RS versions, which are the same projectors with a different color trim ring. If you have no plans to improve the room, then I would probably look at the X550/RS400.
 

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@Javs @stanger89 and others - I did some more SDR vs HDR testing last night based on your feedback. This testing was done with the Panasonic UB900. For reference I have a 2.37 AR 140" 0.95 gain screen and watching 2.40 movies zoomed from the RS500 a little short of mid throw. This starts to push the reasonable limits of the projector's lumens. With 2.40 movies zoomed and the lamp on high and BT2020 filter engaged and iris at 0 I can only get 14 ftL post calibration. A screen with gain would certainly help here, however I'm using a microweave AT screen (0.95 gain, measured) so this will not be changing. I have a total bat cave with full light control.

For both SDR and HDR testing I used high lamp, iris on 0, BT2020 profile from JVC with filter engaged. I used the Integral to force SDR+WCG for SDR testing. For SDR I used the autocal'ed gamma with a correction value of 2.4 with Dark at +2 which I have not measured but understand from Manni's post should yield a BT1886 curve. For HDR I used Gamma D, with Picture tone +14, Dark +5 and Light +7, and Contrast at +13 to clip at pattern 1000. With my 48 nits I previously was using +25 Contrast to clip at pattern 500 but this resulted in way overexposed scenes and Javs (I think?) pointed out that this was way too bright and I should clip around 1000-1200 instead. Making this change certainly removed the overexposed look I had been getting in HDR before.

For test material I mainly focused on Everest UHD blu-ray, for now. I know that may be an odd pick for such a test, but I had recently watched the whole movie in SDR, although that was in low lamp. I compared many scenes - some bright, some dark etc - between SDR and HDR. I really could not see any benefit to HDR at all with this film - I checked many scenes that I thought may have some HDR type effects but really I couldn't find any scenes where the HDR looked more dynamic or had more pop. On the contrary, the SDR image looked considerably better mainly because it seemed to be more defined and sharper with a higher resolution. I was not expecting that. Perhaps the extra contrast from the auto iris helps make things more defined. For instance there are several scenes with lots of rocks all over the ground and they looked far more defined and sharper in SDR.. For this particular movie there's no question that the SDR was considerably better, with the HDR offering absolutely no benefit that I could find.

It was getting late so I didn't test much further, but I did want to take a look at a few scenes from Lucy to compare SDR and HDR with this film. I thought SDR and HDR looked very similar in most scenes. However there were easily some scenes that looked better in HDR. For instance:

in the opening scene with the ape at the water - in HDR there is noticeably more pop and "flare" to the scene, with light reflecting off the water and in the sky. Also the scene where Lucy's face explodes into a million pixel-like colored dots in the bathroom of the plane - in HDR those colors really pop and one side of her face turns really bright. The first time I saw this scene (which was in HDR) my jaw dropped - I was like WOW that is so cool looking. When watching in SDR I was underwhelmed in comparison - just didn't have the same dynamics and pop.

I want to go back and watch Lucy again (for many reasons) and do more A/B comparisons. So far I seem to be reaching the same conclusion that it seems many here have already reached. Which is that HDR definitely has its places and advantages, but that this can vary greatly from film to film - with one film really showing off HDR and another barely noticeably different. And trying to know up front whether its worth sacrificing some overall PQ and contrast/sharpness in exchange for those "HDR moment" is tough because you don't know ahead of time which movie is going to make using HDR "worth it". So I can see how people can "give up" and just use SDR in general as the way to "play it safe". For instance any time I watch Lucy or if showing it off to a friend I'd use HDR. And for Everest I'd use SDR. How can you know this in advance? You can't really, without watching it both ways or at least comparing scenes, or going by someone's word on it from AVS. It could also be a type of movie thing. For instance perhaps sci-fi is generally going to do better with HDR, whereas more of a drama would be better with SDR. When I watch X-Men, Pacific Rim and Ghostbusters I'm sure I'll try those first in HDR. Then circle back and see how SDR looks so I know for next time.

Lastly - the other factor here is screen size. Someone with lots of brightness to spare with a smaller screen may have a far better HDR experience. Although this gives me an idea... for testing purposes I could zoom in to create the smallest possible picture, then watch SDR and HDR comparisons and see if the extra brightness really makes a difference in favor of HDR. This wouldn't help in terms of how I watch movies but it could be educational just to better understand HDR's potential, assuming a smaller screen is indeed better for HDR.

Thoughts?
 

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Amazon better put some of the 4K UHD discs on sale for Black Friday week - I'm gathering quite a list !
Best Buy has a B1G1 50% sale that I think is still going. Its only one B1G1 50% off per order so some folks have been placing multiple orders. I think you have to put the more expensive one in the cart first (if there's a price difference between the titles you pick). See the master UHD disc thread for more info.
 

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Best Buy has a B1G1 50% sale that I think is still going. Its only one B1G1 50% off per order so some folks have been placing multiple orders. I think you have to put the more expensive one in the cart first (if there's a price difference between the titles you pick). See the master UHD disc thread for more info.
I don't see that many titles, so I'm standing down until the shopping frenzy of Black Friday week still.
 

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Yup, but for those who have the Samsung already, like me who bought it first thing, and either don't want to get the Panasonic on top, or are waiting to see what Oppo does, I think it's worth giving HDR a shot, especially if you've got a small screen and can keep the iris relatively closed.

Like I said above, I strayed from JVC's recommendation of wide open, and flipped my RS600 into High lamp, but pulled the Aperture closed as far as I could. I opted to shoot for the HDR Cinema brightness of around 30fL. This seems to give a pretty good compromise of retaining some HDR pop, while not letting black level raise out of control.

You may have missed an earlier large chunk in this thread about the SDR issues w/ the Samsung Stranger but HDR is your only option at this point since the forced SDR output does a poor job at tone mapping and thus results in it being a bit dull (understaurated), and slightly dimmer.

Like Jason said (and in the case of Ric's setup being a really good example), the Panasonic seems to do a great job tone mapping SDR and as a result you get a better Rec.2020 WCG picture because you also get the BCM back on the JVC (use of the DI). Those of us with a K8500 and waiting on the Oppo are only doing so to see what they offer (maybe something better than the Panny?), but all with the intent (end result), of running 4K/SDR/Rec2020/WCG/BCM Nirvana! :D
 

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I do think you guys are missing out a bit though since HDR performance on the UB900 is just as good and clearly exceeds in the SDR mapping. :)
I'd have a Panasonic already if there wasn't an Oppo on the way. And there I'm really just playing wait and see since Oppo has such a good reputation and it's $100-200 cheaper (depending on the sales on the Panasonic).

That said, I need to spend some quality time with HDR now that I've dialed in my settings a bit better. I've got a relatively small screen by this forum's standards, only 110" wide scope, but that means that I can still hit >30fL at -10 Aperture. :cool: Which means I get great JVC contrast, and still have good headroom for HDR highlights, so I've now got to sit down and enjoy some movies in HDR and see how it works, it may tame my enthusiasm for a new BD player.

Lastly - the other factor here is screen size. Someone with lots of brightness to spare with a smaller screen may have a far better HDR experience. Although this gives me an idea... for testing purposes I could zoom in to create the smallest possible picture, then watch SDR and HDR comparisons and see if the extra brightness really makes a difference in favor of HDR. This wouldn't help in terms of how I watch movies but it could be educational just to better understand HDR's potential, assuming a smaller screen is indeed better for HDR.
I know when I was looking at Batman vs Superman, the orbital debris in the menu/opening scene is noticeably brighter in HDR than SDR
 

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I was peaking at the DLA-RS4500K on the company's web page to see how its contrast compares with our RS 500/600's, but all it says there is Dynamic oo:1. I understand about the full off given the laser light engine, but anyone have any idea when the laser isn't off?
I do not think anyone knows for sure, until units are manufactured and tested. Expecting anywhere from 80,000:1 to 120,000:1 native. Even at 80,000:1, we are talking about something that is extra special. Last year when the JVC's came out and had 1,700/1,800 lumens and high native contrast, everyone was floored by what JVC did. This would be upping the ante quite a bit. :)
 

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Amazon better put some of the 4K UHD discs on sale for Black Friday week - I'm gathering quite a list !
Yesterday, you could have purchased all 5 upcoming Jason Bourne UHD discs for $45 at bestbuy.com. (With the 50% discount after first adding another UHD disc to the cart.) But the set sold so quickly it was completely sold out by the time I tried to order.
 

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You may have missed an earlier large chunk in this thread about the SDR issues w/ the Samsung Stranger but HDR is your only option at this point since the forced SDR output does a poor job at tone mapping and thus results in it being a bit dull (understaurated), and slightly dimmer.

Like Jason said (and in the case of Ric's setup being a really good example), the Panasonic seems to do a great job tone mapping SDR and as a result you get a better Rec.2020 WCG picture because you also get the BCM back on the JVC (use of the DI). Those of us with a K8500 and waiting on the Oppo are only doing so to see what they offer (maybe something better than the Panny?), but all with the intent (end result), of running 4K/SDR/Rec2020/WCG/BCM Nirvana! :D
Interesting, as flipping back and forth using the Star Trek Blu Ray and UHD BR, it looks anything but under saturated / dull. Colors look better than the BR, and easily as vibrant. Same with The Revnant, where HDR doesn't bring anything except elevated black levels IMO.

I too am waiting to see what Oppo brings to the party before replacing the Samsung though. I've watched all my 4K movies ( which were double dips ), and I'm not in the mood to double dip more titles until they go on sale. The next 4K disc I plan to buy of a movie I haven't seen yet is the upcoming new Star trek movie. I've got plenty of Blu rays and HDTV to watch in the mean time.
 

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Tweaking HDR with 14 foot wide screens

:eek:
Thanks. I posted my questions about using Contrast set so high a couple days ago but no one commented. Here's how I arrived at Contrast +25:

- BT2020 color space, Tone +14, Bright/Dark +5
- Lamp high, iris -3
- 2.37 AR 140" wide, 0.95 gain, picture zoomed to show 2.40 movie at full screen = 14 ftL = 48 nits
- 48 x 10 = 480.

So with that said, I used the Amazing Spiderman 2 Sony patterns. I carefully evaluated the different contrast settings and what it took to clip at different ranges. To clip at 500 required Contrast of 25. I used mountain snow and cloudy skies to confirm that there we no or very little clipping at 25.

Unless I misunderstood something along the way then I am following the x10 procedure correctly? In which case +25 is what it takes to get Contrast set where it needs to be. I am quite certain that under that number the clipping level raises up. In fact I took some notes - let me see... At +18 the patterns clip at 700, +15 clip at 800, +12 clip at 900, At +28 clip at 400. At 0 clips at 1900 or 2000. +13 clips 1000, +7 at 1200, +3 at 1500 etc.

Based on this do you still think Contrast is set too high? I agree with you that the high contrast setting is causing it to look over exposed. But I am only following directions as to the x10 method. So either I am misunderstanding something or there is a big price to pay in terms of over exposure for trying to get the benefit of HDR, at least as it applies to my screen size?



Interesting. Please see my post to Carbon Ft Print directly above this response to you. What do you make of this?
You've got my attention with your ginormous 14ft screen and low Ypeak levels. Someone else (?) had a similar question, but I could not find the post. If the other suggestions fall flat, give the following a try. You'll have to tweak CR and your clip pts based on 4K movie content for the reasons below. :)
EDIT: I just saw you have the UB900 now. So if HDR does not work out then SDR is your option. :)

1. HDR for projectors: So, let's start by discussing what HDR does for projectors. Dolby Vision put out some bar charts describing benefits of HDR. Look at the bottom bar chart and all the way to the right per the link in this paragraph. It shows at PQ500, brighter highlights for HDR (White Range 250 to 1000nits). If one extrapolates that for 100nits, there is still some HDR benefit left for projectors at Ypeak 100nits ... maybe for 50 nits with some tweaking. :confused: I call these Specular Highlights, even thought they technically are not ... because of the projector's lower brightness levels ... but, it makes projector owners, like moi, feel included in HDR discussions and specular highlights do exist in blu ray movies via reflections off of water, glass, shiny cars and metals. :D See: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-display-calibration/2130474-hdr-calibration-discussion.html#post39828570 . So, the point is one would like to be a minimum of 100 nit Ypeak ... but, that does not work for you because your Ypeak is around half of that: 48 nits due to your large 14ft wide screen. There may still be HDR benefit for large screens like yours ... possibly ... with some tweaking.


2. Measuring HDR's Ypeak: It's possible your 48nit reading is actually higher than what you've stated. My RS600 Ypeak=108nits and the PR670 read 119nits off of the brightest "specular color" point on the screen while watching Warcraft. This still puzzles me. This is a 10% difference, so your Ypeak reading could be higher ... and due to your ginormous 14ft screen, significantly (+10%) higher. That means you'll have to tweak it with actual 4K HDR movie content. :eek:


3. Workflow and What to Look For In 4K HDR Movies: For large screens, keep raising your contrast until you've start to clip in 2 different scenes. First Scene Exposure: HDR permits a wider exposure level so the projector screen can show both indoor and outdoor action (combined in/outdoor exposure levels) at the same time with no clipping ... this cannot be done without "faking it" in SDR ... this is unique to HDR. Get a copy of 4K Gods of Egypt and look at 00:07:48 (hr:min:sec). See: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-427.html#post45788881 . There, you'll want to see the indoor scene with blue skies and white clouds in the background. Second Scene Seering Bright: Pick a scene with the brightest "Specular Colors" and raise the brightness (via CR) until these colors start to clip. Specular colors will clip before non-specular colors. See 4 below. One could pick up a copy of Warcraft and look any of the scenes I've described as "Specular" ... having a brightness rating over 55 nits. This is the only way you'll know for sure what you are looking at is actually Specular colors ... but, I guess if one raises the CR enough stuff will start to clip and, assuming there is specular colors in the scene, then those brightest specular colors will clip first. So maybe your 4K Mt Everest movie is OK. Warcraft: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-499.html#post47157617


4. What's going on with HDR's Absolute Brightness Levels (nits). For 10bits, the luminance levels are 64 to 940 for video. To simply explain it, all the "SDR" (non-specular) content is located between brightness levels 64 - 509 of an HDR brightness range. Patch/level 509 is the 50% point btwn blk and specular white (Ypeak=patch 940), give or take. 509 is Yfull_rng/diffuse white ... so basically, the white one knew at 235 8bit is now 509 in HDR 10bit ... but it will look slightly darker if one deliberately tries to compare 10bit 509 with 8bit 235. They did this so Ymax/full_rng/diffuse white no longer clips like it use to in 8 bit 235 and to add additional brighter specular colors and to widen the exposure levels over SDR. 8 bit 235 use to clip there because white ended there ... with no more content and no room to grow (yep, I know about THX). With HDR, the "specular content" grows beyond 509 through 940. So, in your case, you've got Ypeak=48nits. Ymax/full_rng/diffuse_wht = 24nits. Specular highlight content is from 25-48nits. "SDR" (non specular) content is from 0 to 24 nits. Hence, why HDR uses absolute values rather than relative values (%) used in SDR (e.g. rec709).


5. Last Ditch Effort Increase CR at the Expense of Clipping and Losing Specular Highlights: EDIT: I had to rewrite to better explain how to make HDR (still using Gamma D) content look better through a "limited sacrifice" of "Specular Hightlights" to brighten the content at and below level 509. Why? Ypeak and Yfull-rng/diffuse_wht are dependent upon each other. As one increases Ypeak, the Yfull_rng/diffuse wht increases. If Ypeak is not high enough to begin with (48nits), then the content at and below level 509 will look dim ... so it's not worth trying to make specular highlights look better any more. So keep raising CR and sacrifice a small amount of specular highlights to get the content at and below level 509 to look bright enough. If too much of the specular content is clipped, and the picture looks tortured :eek: , then at that point one is forced into 4K WCG SDR mode. With the UB900, this will be a good alternative. This technique would work better on 4K movies like the Revenant with no CGI because there is no really high specular content so the limited clipping comes for free ... not so much with CGI based movies like Batman vs Superman that use krichter1 eye searing, retina eviscerating specular bombastic highlights. :D Good Luck! :D
 

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If you have light colored walls and a white ceiling, then there is less separation in image quality between the X550 and the X750. We carry the RS versions, which are the same projectors with a different color trim ring. If you have no plans to improve the room, then I would probably look at the X550/RS400.
Thanks for your reply Mike. Yes, the ceilings are white, the walls are a tan color and there are no plans to black out the room further beyond perhaps thicker drapery; it's a functioning Family Room and unfortunately not a man cave. lol Do you think with the level of ambient light I described in my original post, I can opt for a nice gray or white non-ALR screen instead. I am concerned with the limited throw distance (11'-6") using a 100" screen, at the lower end required for most ALR's for that size, will amplify hot spotting and sparkles. I have read these ALR screen anomalies are worsened by short throw distances.

Andres
 

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Thanks for your reply Mike. Yes, the ceilings are white, the walls are a tan color and there are no plans to black out the room further beyond perhaps thicker drapery; it's a functioning Family Room and unfortunately not a man cave. lol Do you think with the level of ambient light I described in my original post, I can opt for a nice gray or white non-ALR screen instead. I am concerned with the limited throw distance (11'-6") using a 100" screen, at the lower end required for most ALR's for that size, will amplify hot spotting and sparkles. I have read these ALR screen anomalies are worsened by short throw distances.

Andres
At 100" size, you could go with a lower gain gray screen. If we can help you, shoot us a PM.
 

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@Javs @stanger89 and others - I did some more SDR vs HDR testing last night based on your feedback. This testing was done with the Panasonic UB900. For reference I have a 2.37 AR 140" 0.95 gain screen and watching 2.40 movies zoomed from the RS500 a little short of mid throw. This starts to push the reasonable limits of the projector's lumens. With 2.40 movies zoomed and the lamp on high and BT2020 filter engaged and iris at 0 I can only get 14 ftL post calibration. A screen with gain would certainly help here, however I'm using a microweave AT screen (0.95 gain, measured) so this will not be changing. I have a total bat cave with full light control.

For both SDR and HDR testing I used high lamp, iris on 0, BT2020 profile from JVC with filter engaged. I used the Integral to force SDR+WCG for SDR testing. For SDR I used the autocal'ed gamma with a correction value of 2.4 with Dark at +2 which I have not measured but understand from Manni's post should yield a BT1886 curve. For HDR I used Gamma D, with Picture tone +14, Dark +5 and Light +7, and Contrast at +13 to clip at pattern 1000. With my 48 nits I previously was using +25 Contrast to clip at pattern 500 but this resulted in way overexposed scenes and Javs (I think?) pointed out that this was way too bright and I should clip around 1000-1200 instead. Making this change certainly removed the overexposed look I had been getting in HDR before.

For test material I mainly focused on Everest UHD blu-ray, for now. I know that may be an odd pick for such a test, but I had recently watched the whole movie in SDR, although that was in low lamp. I compared many scenes - some bright, some dark etc - between SDR and HDR. I really could not see any benefit to HDR at all with this film - I checked many scenes that I thought may have some HDR type effects but really I couldn't find any scenes where the HDR looked more dynamic or had more pop. On the contrary, the SDR image looked considerably better mainly because it seemed to be more defined and sharper with a higher resolution. I was not expecting that. Perhaps the extra contrast from the auto iris helps make things more defined. For instance there are several scenes with lots of rocks all over the ground and they looked far more defined and sharper in SDR.. For this particular movie there's no question that the SDR was considerably better, with the HDR offering absolutely no benefit that I could find.

It was getting late so I didn't test much further, but I did want to take a look at a few scenes from Lucy to compare SDR and HDR with this film. I thought SDR and HDR looked very similar in most scenes. However there were easily some scenes that looked better in HDR. For instance:

in the opening scene with the ape at the water - in HDR there is noticeably more pop and "flare" to the scene, with light reflecting off the water and in the sky. Also the scene where Lucy's face explodes into a million pixel-like colored dots in the bathroom of the plane - in HDR those colors really pop and one side of her face turns really bright. The first time I saw this scene (which was in HDR) my jaw dropped - I was like WOW that is so cool looking. When watching in SDR I was underwhelmed in comparison - just didn't have the same dynamics and pop.

I want to go back and watch Lucy again (for many reasons) and do more A/B comparisons. So far I seem to be reaching the same conclusion that it seems many here have already reached. Which is that HDR definitely has its places and advantages, but that this can vary greatly from film to film - with one film really showing off HDR and another barely noticeably different. And trying to know up front whether its worth sacrificing some overall PQ and contrast/sharpness in exchange for those "HDR moment" is tough because you don't know ahead of time which movie is going to make using HDR "worth it". So I can see how people can "give up" and just use SDR in general as the way to "play it safe". For instance any time I watch Lucy or if showing it off to a friend I'd use HDR. And for Everest I'd use SDR. How can you know this in advance? You can't really, without watching it both ways or at least comparing scenes, or going by someone's word on it from AVS. It could also be a type of movie thing. For instance perhaps sci-fi is generally going to do better with HDR, whereas more of a drama would be better with SDR. When I watch X-Men, Pacific Rim and Ghostbusters I'm sure I'll try those first in HDR. Then circle back and see how SDR looks so I know for next time.

Lastly - the other factor here is screen size. Someone with lots of brightness to spare with a smaller screen may have a far better HDR experience. Although this gives me an idea... for testing purposes I could zoom in to create the smallest possible picture, then watch SDR and HDR comparisons and see if the extra brightness really makes a difference in favor of HDR. This wouldn't help in terms of how I watch movies but it could be educational just to better understand HDR's potential, assuming a smaller screen is indeed better for HDR.

Thoughts?
I think HDR being movie dependent is probably true. CGI based films will certainly be the type of film that could look better with HDR. The Revenant probably wasn't the best candidate since it was all shot outdoors with natural lighting. So how do you know in advance ? You don't. It's not ' plug 'n play " at this point. I'll need to preview every 4K movie to determine which way it looks better. And make a note on a sticker on the back of the case, like I do now with audio levels and aspect ratio ( when that isn't on the movie case to begin with - a pet peeve of mine ).
 

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Has anyone successfully got a 4k Integral working with a Panasonic dmp-ub900 player and a JVC RS600 projector? I can't even get a signal to the projector thru the 4k from the player. I'm getting no help from HDFury. They won't respond to my emails. Just wondering if someone else got this working? Thanks
 

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Has anyone successfully got a 4k Integral working with a Panasonic dmp-ub900 player and a JVC RS600 projector? I can't even get a signal to the projector thru the 4k from the player. I'm getting no help from HDFury. They won't respond to my emails. Just wondering if someone else got this working? Thanks

It works many of us have this running .
 

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I do not think anyone knows for sure, until units are manufactured and tested. Expecting anywhere from 80,000:1 to 120,000:1 native. Even at 80,000:1, we are talking about something that is extra special. Last year when the JVC's came out and had 1,700/1,800 lumens and high native contrast, everyone was floored by what JVC did. This would be upping the ante quite a bit. :)
Thanks, Mike. I'll have to take a peek at it in action. The description on the site states that the HDR preset is based on 1,000nit brightness. And it all sounds amazing! But I'd love to know/see in person how sharp it is relative to my current PJ. As you know, with three chippers, the slightest offset in convergence can significantly degrade the images regardless of whether the 4K is faux or native, so I'm expecting convergence to be tight in this one.
 

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Has anyone successfully got a 4k Integral working with a Panasonic dmp-ub900 player and a JVC RS600 projector? I can't even get a signal to the projector thru the 4k from the player. I'm getting no help from HDFury. They won't respond to my emails. Just wondering if someone else got this working? Thanks
Did you try the HD Fury thread?
 
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